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Defense Procurement Scandal

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1988
Somehow, Iran, Meese/Wedtech, etc. and now governmental procurement make Richard Nixon stand taller every day! HOWARD B. ANDREEN Camarillo
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Melvyn R. Paisley, a former assistant secretary of the Navy who was a central target in a major defense procurement scandal in the 1980s, has died. He was 77. Paisley, a resident of McLean, Va., died of cancer Dec. 19, his wife, Vicki, told the Associated Press. He had been fighting the disease since the early 1980s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Melvyn R. Paisley, a former assistant secretary of the Navy who was a central target in a major defense procurement scandal in the 1980s, has died. He was 77. Paisley, a resident of McLean, Va., died of cancer Dec. 19, his wife, Vicki, told the Associated Press. He had been fighting the disease since the early 1980s.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Melvyn R. Paisley, a former assistant secretary of the Navy and the highest-ranking target of the long-running Operation Ill Wind defense procurement investigation, was sentenced Friday to four years in prison without parole. The sentence for the ailing, 66-year-old Paisley is the stiffest so far in the broad investigation into corruption in the military's $100-billion-a-year purchasing program. So far, 52 individuals and corporations have been convicted in the ongoing inquiry.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Melvyn R. Paisley, a former assistant secretary of the Navy and the highest-ranking target of the long-running Operation Ill Wind defense procurement investigation, was sentenced Friday to four years in prison without parole. The sentence for the ailing, 66-year-old Paisley is the stiffest so far in the broad investigation into corruption in the military's $100-billion-a-year purchasing program. So far, 52 individuals and corporations have been convicted in the ongoing inquiry.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Defense consultant William M. Galvin was sentenced to 32 months in prison today for bribing two senior Pentagon officials to influence the awarding of lucrative military contracts. Galvin, 59, a major figure in the defense procurement scandal, was also fined $10,000 by U.S. District Judge Claude M. Hilton in Alexandria, Va., on his guilty plea to conspiracy, bribery and tax evasion. With another 32-month prison term given to a former Unisys Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1989
The editorial was an outstanding summation on the culpability of a failed nomination. The defense procurement scandal is one of the biggest problems the Pentagon and the country face. For a President to nominate and senators to vote for an individual with even an iota of a question as to the individual's involvement in such activity is real evidence of partisan politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1985
In each new defense procurement scandal, one looks in vain for assurance that anyone will be seriously and personally punished. We may be witnessing the promulgation of a new legal principle that might be called "corporate gremlinship," after the mythical saboteurs of military aircraft in World War II. Now that the so-called Department of Justice has given the new doctrine its most spectacularly successful test in the E.F. Hutton check-kiting case,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1988
The article on Leonid Brezhnev (Part I, June 25) indicates that in the 1970s, although the Soviet Union could not afford to match the West gun for gun and missile for missile, the Brezhnev administration attempted it, without "realism or common sense." Change a few names, fast-forward a decade, cross the Atlantic and what do we find? Us--additionally with our current Pentagon procurement scandal. HARRY M . BAUER Sherman Oaks
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