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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1993
A lot of Americans are defined as middle class. Perhaps it's because they're the ones who always seem to get caught in the middle. REX D. FRAZIER Covina
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
Ralph Wilson, who founded the Buffalo Bills with a $25,000 investment in 1959 and turned the team into western New York's defining institution, died Tuesday after years of failing health. He was 95. Wilson was surrounded by his family when he died at his home in Grosse Pointe, Mich. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell informed team owners of the news at the league's annual meetings in Orlando, Fla. Goodell called Wilson "a driving force in developing pro football into America's most popular sport" and "a trusted advisor to his fellow league owners and the commissioner.
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OPINION
February 21, 1988
If property owners were made legally responsible for keeping their walls graffiti-free, the city would look cleaner and gang turfs would be less clearly defined. WILLIAM A.F. BRAEM Sherman Oaks
SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers may finish with their worst record in franchise history, with injuries to blame. All-Star guard Kobe Bryant has played in just six games with Achilles and knee injuries. Steve Nash missed all but 10 games. Jordan Farmar, Pau Gasol, Steve Blake (since traded), Nick Young and Xavier Henry have all missed significant time. If the Lakers had any hope of a playoff run this season, they were quickly dashed with a decimated roster. Check out this graphic by the L.A. Times' Matt Moody showing games missed as a result of of injury.
OPINION
March 26, 1995
A March 16 contributor defined liberal as someone who says "I want to spend your money." Does that mean a conservative is someone who says "I want to spend your children's money"? LARRY LaCROIX Sylmar
NEWS
April 21, 1991
About Kitty Kelley's book on the Reagans, Webster's says to assert is "to state confidently without regard for evidence." The Times says Kitty Kelley makes scandalous "assertions" about the first family. You said it all. You defined the book. I agree with you. VETTE CARR Glendora
BUSINESS
October 1, 1989
Unanswered in your Sept. 14 story about Audi ("Audi Sales Still Weak, Despite Federal Report That Car Is Safe") is the question: Why did hundreds of people who do not know the difference between a brake pedal and accelerator, defined as "pedal misapplication," buy only Audi automobiles? Before the car is given a complete bill of good health, this phenomenon should be fully explored. JOHN C. MARTIN Palmdale
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1991
"Life Stinks" may not earn millions for Brooks or the studio. But, ironically, that relates directly to one of the film's several beneficial messages--that is, our sense of self-worth should not be defined by our possessions but by who we are. Such an admirable concept may not be well received in business circles, but it's a reason for being for the homeless. MARSHALL McNOTT Claremont
MAGAZINE
March 21, 1999
"Guessing Games" (by Lynell George, Feb. 21) dealt with "passing," a term I'd never heard before. That's probably because I am white and grew up in an all-white town on the East Coast, moving to California in 1974. Things are different here. As the most diverse part of the nation, we have the greatest opportunity to break down the walls that separate us. I keep recalling a line I read somewhere: "Race exists because there is prejudice, not the other way around." I think of that statement often.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Alex B. Berezow
Psychologist Timothy D. Wilson, a professor at the University of Virginia, expressed resentment in his Times Op-Ed article on Thursday over the fact that most scientists don't consider his field a real science. He casts scientists as condescending bullies: "Once, during a meeting at my university, a biologist mentioned that he was the only faculty member present from a science department. When I corrected him, noting that I was from the Department of Psychology, he waved his hand dismissively, as if I were a Little Leaguer telling a member of the New York Yankees that I too played baseball.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | By Lara Krupicka
The iconic Statue of Liberty, positioned in New York Harbor to welcome those entering the United States, stands as a symbol of what's best about our country and the freedom it has offered so many. But it was only when I visited Lady Liberty for the first time recently that I discovered something else she represents: an early example of crowdfunding. A display in the museum on Liberty Island describes how, in 1885, Joseph Pulitzer ran an appeal to readers of his newspaper the New York World for funds to build the statue's pedestal.
SPORTS
March 8, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. --  Kole Calhoun is having a little identity crisis. "I've kind of had these weird baseball personalities," the Angels right fielder said. "Am I a leadoff guy? A power guy? A guy who steals bases? I don't know. I just want to play, and you can define what it is that I do. " The Angels want Calhoun to bat leadoff, but they don't need him to be Rickey Henderson . They'd gladly take Calhoun's final two months of 2013, when he was called up from triple A in late July and hit .282 with a .347 on-base percentage, a .462 slugging percentage, eight home runs and 32 runs batted in. "With some of the adjustments he's made with his swing and approach, he's really become a tough out," Manager Mike Scioscia said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Meg James
For Maria Bartiromo, it was time to take stock. "Sometimes in life you have to have a little courage," the longtime star of business channel CNBC said over the phone. "I wanted to try something new, something in which I could learn and grow. " After 20 years, Bartiromo gave up her comfortable perch at CNBC and moved to rival Fox Business Network, where on Monday she debuts a live, two-hour morning show, "Opening Bell With Maria Bartiromo. " PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV CNBC may have nearly three times the audience of Fox Business, but her defection is a big loss.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
Would a spanking proposal introduced by a Wichita lawmaker give Kansas teachers new leeway to rough up the state's schoolchildren? That's how some online reports have characterized the measure, which was introduced last week by Rep. Gail Finney -- ostensibly in an effort to reduce child abuse, not encourage it in the classroom. “Kansas bill would allow spanking that leaves marks,” screamed one headline. “Teachers could spank harder under bill pending in KS legislature,” warned another.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Randee Dawn
Pinning down the "best" scene of any Oscar-nominated performance is something of a Stygian nightmare for producers because - as they correctly protest - if an actor or actress has been nominated, they have far more than one great scene. But when ballots are being ticked off by academy voters later this month, most of them will have a single, crystallizing, moment held in their memory that helps them choose one performance over another. Here, then, are 10 of those great, possibly award-winning, moments: Christian Bale / "American Hustle" The setup: To avoid jail time, two low-level con artists are enlisted by an FBI agent to teach them how the business works … but the agent may be the one who ends up getting conned.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Among 10 rule changes approved for the 2014 high school football season, the National Federation of State High School Associations Football Rules Committee put together a definition for "targeting," and it will be penalized as illegal personal contact. New rule 2-43 will read: "Targeting is an act of taking aim and initiating contact to an opponent above the shoulders with the helmet, forearm, hand, fist, elbow or shoulders. " The rule is an effort to minimize risk of injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, Times Staff Writer
Five cities in predominantly minority sections of Los Angeles County have been ranked among the poorest communities in the nation by a Chicago-based urbanologist whose survey has come under fire by local demographers and city officials. The 23-page report on the 60 wealthiest and 15 poorest U.S. suburbs, prepared by Roosevelt University professor Pierre deVise, shows per capita yearly income for Cudahy, Bell Gardens, Huntington Park, Compton and South El Monte ranging from $5,170 to $7,100.
REAL ESTATE
March 5, 1989 | MARILYN HOFFMAN, The Christian Science Monitor
Great barns are an important part of the rural landscape. They are familiar landmarks that speak of seedtime and harvest, of hay and horses, milk and memories. Many barns in the United States represent the building traditions of settlers from many other parts of the world. Numerous ethnic groups came to be identified by their distinctive old-country barn types.
OPINION
February 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Two decades ago, Congress overwhelmingly approved and President Clinton enthusiastically signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. But now that the 1993 law is being used to challenge the Obama administration's requirement that employer health plans include contraceptive services, some supporters of the law are having second thoughts, and several organizations want the Supreme Court to declare it unconstitutional. That would be a mistake. The law was a response to a 1990 Supreme Court decision involving two Oregon men who had been denied unemployment benefits after they were fired for using the hallucinogenic drug peyote during a Native American religious rite.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
When Nic Pizzolatto was 5, he had an epiphany. It wasn't the usual childhood one about finger-painting or bike-riding or other regular kid stuff. It was that one day he would die. "You know how people say that young people feel immortal? I don't know what they're talking about," he said. "I was planning for how I would deal with my death in good conscience well before I even hit puberty. " The moment captures Pizzolatto, one of the more colorful creative types to emerge in Hollywood in recent years and the force behind HBO's "True Detective," the Louisiana-set, time-jumping Matthew McConaughey-Woody Harrelson noir series that premieres Sunday.
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