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SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Deforestaton is propeling fast changes in evolution, a study of the Brazilian rain forest suggests. Researchers found that in areas where populations of large-billed, fruit-eating birds, such as toucans, have been driven out because of deforestation, palm trees have evolved to produce smaller and less successful seeds. The Brazilian scientists collected more than 9,000 seeds from 22 palm populations in patches of rain forest that had been fragmented by coffee and sugar cane development during the 1800s.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google is bringing awareness to global deforestation with a new website that lets users see how the world's forests have been being cut down since 2000. The Silicon Valley tech giant has partnered with the World Resources Institute and numerous other organizations to launch Global Forest Watch , a visual map website that lets anyone track deforestation around the world Global Forest Watch shows data for deforestation going back to 2000, and it includes numerous analytical features.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google is bringing awareness to global deforestation with a new website that lets users see how the world's forests have been being cut down since 2000. The Silicon Valley tech giant has partnered with the World Resources Institute and numerous other organizations to launch Global Forest Watch , a visual map website that lets anyone track deforestation around the world Global Forest Watch shows data for deforestation going back to 2000, and it includes numerous analytical features.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Deforestaton is propeling fast changes in evolution, a study of the Brazilian rain forest suggests. Researchers found that in areas where populations of large-billed, fruit-eating birds, such as toucans, have been driven out because of deforestation, palm trees have evolved to produce smaller and less successful seeds. The Brazilian scientists collected more than 9,000 seeds from 22 palm populations in patches of rain forest that had been fragmented by coffee and sugar cane development during the 1800s.
WORLD
October 13, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
People here remember when hundreds of Pakistani Taliban militants roamed through the forested ridges flanking the Chail River, armed not with AK-47s but with axes. Employing termite-like efficiency, the militants felled and carted away vast swaths of Himalayan cedar, blue pine and oak, leaving mountainsides dotted with stumps. Through illegal logging, the Taliban generated quick cash to keep its arsenals stocked. But nearly a decade of tree felling by militants and 35 years of deforestation by unscrupulous timber businesses and wealthy landowners have had an unforeseen consequence.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | Reuters
The level of destruction of the Brazilian Amazon through burning and logging fell 65% this year, newspapers reported Monday. The National Environment Institute attributed the decline since 1989 to "Operation Amazon," a joint effort of the institute, the federal police and the armed forces to combat deforestation.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Gunmen in the Amazon ambushed and killed an internationally acclaimed ecologist who led the fight to save the jungle from deforestation, Brazilian police said Friday. The victim said two weeks ago that his life had been threatened. The 44-year-old ecologist, Francisco Mendes, was shot Thursday night at his home in Xapuri, a remote western town near the Bolivian border, said Federal Police Chief Mauro Sposito.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Careful analysis of satellite images indicates that the Amazon rain forest is being deforested at a considerably lower rate than recently estimated, but the impact on biological diversity may be greater than feared, University of New Hampshire and NASA scientists report. That apparent paradox is because of the pattern of forest loss, the scientists report today in the journal Science.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A peasant farmer who forged a prize-winning grass-roots campaign against rampant deforestation in southwestern Mexico was convicted Monday of drug and weapons charges, evoking outraged protests from environmental and human rights groups. Lawyers for Rodolfo Montiel said a judge in the small town of Iguala had sentenced Montiel to six years and eight months in prison. A colleague of Montiel, Teodoro Cabrera, received a 10-year sentence.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With about a third of the nearly 700 deaths from last weekend's strong earthquake occurring in one suburban neighborhood in the foothills of a deforested mountain, Salvadorans on Tuesday debated whether there was someone to blame for the tragedy and, if so, who.
WORLD
May 29, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - The Brazilian government is pressing forward with controversial legislation that critics say will lead to widespread destruction of the Amazon rain forest. After months of heated discussion, President Dilma Rousseff on Monday presented a final version of the bill that was heavily influenced by the country's powerful agricultural lobby. The update to the country's 1965 Forestry Code would reduce both the amount of vegetation landowners must preserve and the future penalties paid for those who currently flout environmental laws.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2011 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
It's official: Barbie has broken up with Asia Pulp & Paper Co. Responding to a campaign by environmental activists at Greenpeace, toy giant Mattel Inc., maker of the famed Barbie doll line, announced Wednesday that it would stop buying paper and packaging that the environmental group has linked to rain forest destruction in Indonesia. The El Segundo company said it would tell suppliers to avoid wood fiber from companies "that are known to be involved in deforestation. " Among those companies, Greenpeace said in a statement, is Asia Pulp & Paper.
WORLD
October 13, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
People here remember when hundreds of Pakistani Taliban militants roamed through the forested ridges flanking the Chail River, armed not with AK-47s but with axes. Employing termite-like efficiency, the militants felled and carted away vast swaths of Himalayan cedar, blue pine and oak, leaving mountainsides dotted with stumps. Through illegal logging, the Taliban generated quick cash to keep its arsenals stocked. But nearly a decade of tree felling by militants and 35 years of deforestation by unscrupulous timber businesses and wealthy landowners have had an unforeseen consequence.
WORLD
April 26, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
The images are heart-rending, farmers kneeling over the cracked earth that looks to be straight out of a post-apocalyptic movie, the dust swirling in the wind. But what underlies China's worst drought in nearly a century is a matter of great debate. Is it Mother Nature or human failure? Beyond the official explanation of "abnormal weather," Chinese environmentalists are pointing to deforestation, pollution, dams, overbuilding and other man-made factors. Scientists are searching for clues about why rain hasn't come in some parts of the country.
WORLD
April 13, 2010 | By Marcelo Soares and Chris Kraul
Reporting from Bogota, Colombia, and Sao Paulo, Brazil -- A Brazilian court has convicted a rancher in the 2005 killing a U.S.-born nun, Dorothy Stang, in the third trial that the co-mastermind of her murder has faced. After 15 hours of deliberations, a jury found Vitalmiro Bastos de Moura guilty of planning the killing of Stang, 73. At the time of her death from six gunshots at close range, she was living among landless peasants in remote Para state in the Amazon River basin. Authorities have long alleged that De Moura, now 39, plotted Stang's murder because she blocked him and other ranchers from taking over land that had been set aside for the poor for sustainable development.
WORLD
December 17, 2009 | By Margot Roosevelt
Signaling a breakthrough on a key climate change issue, the United States and five other nations Wednesday pledged $3.5 billion over three years to preserve the world's forests. "Protecting the world's tropical rain forest is not a luxury, it is a necessity," Agriculture Secretary Thomas Vilsack said, noting that deforestation accounts for 17% of humanity's emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases. The U.S. said it would contribute $1 billion through 2012. As a comprehensive agreement in Copenhagen remains elusive, negotiators this week nonetheless reached a tentative consensus on rules to preserve forests, including verification measures, the need to protect biodiversity, and the recognition of indigenous peoples' rights.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pulling his car out of the parking lot of the Sarawak Forest Department, Philip Ngau Jalong nodded at the surrounding buildings and driveways and said, "This was all forest reserve land." And they cut the trees down to put up the Forest Department? He gave an embarrassed laugh--more an involuntary facial grimace than a sound--as he continued, gesturing across the highway, "The golf course too. State reserve."
WORLD
December 17, 2009 | By Margot Roosevelt
Signaling a breakthrough on a key climate change issue, the United States and five other nations Wednesday pledged $3.5 billion over three years to preserve the world's forests. "Protecting the world's tropical rain forest is not a luxury, it is a necessity," Agriculture Secretary Thomas Vilsack said, noting that deforestation accounts for 17% of humanity's emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases. The U.S. said it would contribute $1 billion through 2012. As a comprehensive agreement in Copenhagen remains elusive, negotiators this week nonetheless reached a tentative consensus on rules to preserve forests, including verification measures, the need to protect biodiversity, and the recognition of indigenous peoples' rights.
WORLD
November 21, 2009 | By Robyn Dixon
Foreigners have come to Anjandobo village, a cluster of wooden huts on the desolate red dust of southern Madagascar. They're vaza -- outsiders. The vaza are sweating. They wear hats and carry cameras and plastic bottles of water. The sun exhausts the vaza : four journalists and a group of aid workers from UNICEF and the World Food Program. Scorpions bristle under rocks. There's little shade. A small Anjandobo child watches the vaza with their water bottles.
SCIENCE
November 2, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
The Nazca people of Peru -- famous for their huge line drawings on an arid plateau that are fully visible only from the air -- set the stage for their demise by deforesting the plain, allowing a huge El Niño-fueled flood to ravage the Ica Valley about AD 500, researchers have found. "They died out because they destroyed their natural ecosystem," said archaeologist Alex J. Chepstow-Lusty of the French Institute of Andean Studies in Lima, coauthor of a paper in the current issue of Latin American Antiquity.
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