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Degenerative Disease

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1988
Carson Councilman Tom Mills, who recently was hospitalized for complications stemming from gall bladder surgery in June, says he expects to be back at council meetings by the end of the month. Mills' absence from the council since Jan. 6 has provoked widespread rumors at City Hall. In an interview he gave from his hospital bed recently, Mills denied that he has cancer or any other degenerative disease. He said his doctors have told him that his condition is treatable and curable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 10, 2013 | By Sam Farmer and Rosie Mestel
Junior Seau, among the greatest linebackers in NFL history, suffered from degenerative brain disease when he fatally shot himself in May, the National Institutes of Health said in a study released Thursday, another blow to a league whose former players say they were never warned about the dangers of head injuries. More than 2,000 former players are suing the NFL, contending the league never properly addressed the problems with head injuries and in many cases withheld information about the long-term effects associated with them.
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NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Melissa Healy
A new study of brains donated after death details the degenerative brain disease that afflicted 68 of 85 subjects who suffered multiple concussions during stints in the military or in organized sports. Among the deceased athletes whose brains were examined for the study were NFL Hall of Famers John Mackey, a tight end, and running back Ollie Matson, both of whom died in 2011 of dementia complications. Among those diagnosed post-mortem as suffering from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, 26% were considered suicidal at some point in their lives, and at least seven ultimately took their own lives, the study found.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Melissa Healy
A new study of brains donated after death details the degenerative brain disease that afflicted 68 of 85 subjects who suffered multiple concussions during stints in the military or in organized sports. Among the deceased athletes whose brains were examined for the study were NFL Hall of Famers John Mackey, a tight end, and running back Ollie Matson, both of whom died in 2011 of dementia complications. Among those diagnosed post-mortem as suffering from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, 26% were considered suicidal at some point in their lives, and at least seven ultimately took their own lives, the study found.
HEALTH
November 8, 1999
Alzheimer's is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain and the most common form of dementia. Here are facts and figures: * About 4 million Americans have it. * Fourteen million Americans will have it by the middle of the 21st century unless a cure or prevention is found. * One in 10 people older than 65 and nearly half of those older than 85 have it. A small percentage of people in their 30s and 40s get the disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1987 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Just about all of 10-year-old Mandy Porter's dreams came true on her summer vacation in California this week. The blue-eyed, freckle-faced St. Louis native went to all the usual places that a tourist her age would go: the beach, Disneyland, Knott's Berry Farm. She also managed to go to several spots where few tourists get the chance to tread. Last week she was a featured guest on "A.M. Los Angeles." Afterward, basketball star Kareem Abdul Jabbar presented her with a gift.
OPINION
November 29, 1998 | ARTHUR D. SILK, Arthur D. Silk, an internist in Garden Grove, has been an elected representative to the California Medical Assn. and a California delegate to the American Medical Assn
Distracted by too much Monica or diverted by repeated HMO horror stories, most seniors are not aware that even fee-for-service Medicare patients are not covered for the mainstream medical care they thought they were promised. For example, even an 80-year-old is not allowed an annual physical examination unless he is willing to pay for the visit out of pocket. Patients don't usually enter a doctor's office and announce that they have cancer or diabetes.
SPORTS
January 10, 2013 | By Sam Farmer and Rosie Mestel
Junior Seau, among the greatest linebackers in NFL history, suffered from degenerative brain disease when he fatally shot himself in May, the National Institutes of Health said in a study released Thursday, another blow to a league whose former players say they were never warned about the dangers of head injuries. More than 2,000 former players are suing the NFL, contending the league never properly addressed the problems with head injuries and in many cases withheld information about the long-term effects associated with them.
HEALTH
November 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration has granted approval for the first artificial spinal disk for use in patients suffering from persistent lower back pain. The Charite artificial disk is made by DePuy Spine Inc., of Raynham, Mass. Artificial disks have long been used in Europe. The approval was granted Tuesday. The disk, a plastic core sandwiched by two metal plates, is intended as an alternative to spinal fusion surgery.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc., which caused a splash on Wall Street when it went public recently, hopes one day to be the next Amgen Inc.--that is, the next blockbuster biotechnology company. And Amgen hopes Regeneron becomes the next Amgen. That's because Amgen, based in Thousand Oaks, is a major partner in the effort by 3-year-old Regeneron to develop and market biotechnology-based drugs that would combat Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and other neurological ailments.
SPORTS
March 3, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Bob Probert might have been the most feared NHL player who ever raised a fist, a wild brawler who often skated off bloodied and battered but to enthusiastic applause. He spent 16 seasons as an enforcer for the Chicago Blackhawks and Detroit Red Wings, avenging slights against teammates and energizing his team. Decades of fighting on the ice and hard living away from it took a heavy toll though: He died of a heart attack last summer at 45. Probert's contribution as a player was measured in penalty minutes, not in goals.
SCIENCE
February 17, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Archaeologists have weaved elaborate tales of intrigue and deceit about the death at age 19 of Egypt's fabled boy king Tutankhamen, with theories that include poisoning by his regent, Aye, and a blow to the head by thugs hired by Aye, but new research indicates his cause of death was probably more mundane -- complications from a broken leg and malaria. Using a new approach for analyzing mummies called molecular Egyptology, an international team of researchers found DNA traces of malaria parasites in the boy-king's brain, suggesting an infection was a major factor in his death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Carol, an Asian elephant who gained national acclaim by appearing on the "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson," has been euthanized by veterinarians at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park, zoo officials announced Tuesday. The 40-year-old elephant had been suffering from a painful degenerative joint disease. Zoo officials say they tried for years to help Carol with therapy, a specialized diet and exercise. They also installed a padded floor in the elephant barn.
HEALTH
November 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration has granted approval for the first artificial spinal disk for use in patients suffering from persistent lower back pain. The Charite artificial disk is made by DePuy Spine Inc., of Raynham, Mass. Artificial disks have long been used in Europe. The approval was granted Tuesday. The disk, a plastic core sandwiched by two metal plates, is intended as an alternative to spinal fusion surgery.
HEALTH
November 8, 1999
Alzheimer's is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain and the most common form of dementia. Here are facts and figures: * About 4 million Americans have it. * Fourteen million Americans will have it by the middle of the 21st century unless a cure or prevention is found. * One in 10 people older than 65 and nearly half of those older than 85 have it. A small percentage of people in their 30s and 40s get the disease.
OPINION
November 29, 1998 | ARTHUR D. SILK, Arthur D. Silk, an internist in Garden Grove, has been an elected representative to the California Medical Assn. and a California delegate to the American Medical Assn
Distracted by too much Monica or diverted by repeated HMO horror stories, most seniors are not aware that even fee-for-service Medicare patients are not covered for the mainstream medical care they thought they were promised. For example, even an 80-year-old is not allowed an annual physical examination unless he is willing to pay for the visit out of pocket. Patients don't usually enter a doctor's office and announce that they have cancer or diabetes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's 3 p.m. on Tuesday, time for the weekly "Club Doug" show on Saddleback College's student-run public radio station. "This is KSBR, 88.5 on the FM dial. Let's get the afternoon rolling, and if there's something you want to hear, give me a call," says the program's host, Doug Wells, settling down for his three-hour shift.
SPORTS
March 3, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Bob Probert might have been the most feared NHL player who ever raised a fist, a wild brawler who often skated off bloodied and battered but to enthusiastic applause. He spent 16 seasons as an enforcer for the Chicago Blackhawks and Detroit Red Wings, avenging slights against teammates and energizing his team. Decades of fighting on the ice and hard living away from it took a heavy toll though: He died of a heart attack last summer at 45. Probert's contribution as a player was measured in penalty minutes, not in goals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's 3 p.m. on Tuesday, time for the weekly "Club Doug" show on Saddleback College's student-run public radio station. "This is KSBR, 88.5 on the FM dial. Let's get the afternoon rolling, and if there's something you want to hear, give me a call," says the program's host, Doug Wells, settling down for his three-hour shift.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Imagine Los Angeles with half its power plants shut down. At best, such conditions would produce a "brownout," with large sections of the city working far below optimum efficiency. At worst, traffic lights would blink out, leaving arteries clogged; the computers vital to the city's activities would go off-line and communications would be severely impaired, leaving the entire city rudderless. Now imagine your body with three-quarters of its energy-producing factories shut down. The brain would be impaired, vision would dim, muscles would twitch spastically, the heart would weaken and the liver would be impaired.
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