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Deirdre O Donoghue

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001
Sundays have lost something for the many baby boomers who found in Deirdre O'Donoghue's long-running "Breakfast With the Beatles" radio show the background sound for day-off freeway trips and leisure time. O'Donoghue, who died unexpectedly at her Santa Monica home this week, held an encyclopedic knowledge of all things related to the Beatles and their music, which nourished boomers' romanticized recollections of the 1960s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
"Don't forget they only make pop records out of plastic," the chap who calls himself the Jazz Butcher sang Thursday at the Roxy. The message: no point in taking this too seriously. Yet the Butcher and his three-member group Sikkorskis From Hell demonstrated enough wit to make their music more than just the stuff of good times.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1988
DOORS: 14 David Anderle, vice president of film music, A & M Records Lenny Beer, editor, Hits magazine Jay Boberg, president, I.R.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2006 | Randy Lewis
Fans who tune in Sunday morning at 10 to KLSX-FM (97.1) will hear the same mix of Beatles songs, history and trivia they've gotten used to during the 23-year life of "Breakfast With the Beatles," radio's longest-running show dedicated to the Fab Four's music. But after that they'll only have three more chances to hear it. Come Sept. 10, for the first time in a quarter-century, "BWTB" will go off the air.
NEWS
February 3, 2005 | Kevin Bronson
Releasing collections of obscurities or B-sides can be dicey. Mainly for-devoted-fans-only propositions, such albums often merely reinforce why their contents were obscure, more than showcasing the depths of an artist's talents. None of which applies to the Mighty Lemon Drops' "Young, Gifted, and Black Country." It is not only a reminder that the Lemon Drops (1985 to 1992) might have been better than you remember (if you remember), but listening is like opening a time capsule.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The attraction at the Troubadour on Wednesday was a bunch of singer-songwriters sittin' around with acoustic guitars--kind of like McCabe's, but with waitresses and clinking bottles. Hosting the affair was deejay Deirdre O'Donoghue, asking questions of each of the five between songs--like a live radio broadcast, but at $20. And the whole affair was as informal as allowable--like your living room, albeit with a much better guest list.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN
The attraction at the Troubadour on Wednesday was a bunch of singer-songwriters sittin' around with acoustic guitars--kind of like McCabe's, but with waitresses and clinking bottles. Hosting the affair was deejay Deirdre O'Donoghue, asking questions of each of the five between songs--like a live radio broadcast, but at $20. And the whole affair was as informal as allowable--like your living room, albeit with a much better guest list.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1993 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
* KXLU-FM (88.9)--The only refuge for punks and hard-core fans of the obscure, the wild, the sexy, the garbled and the cutting edge. Staffed and hosted by students at Loyola Marymount University, the station lacks professionalism and proper radio decorum, which to devotees just adds to its charms. The frustrating drawback is that sometimes you'll never know the name of the band singing that amazing new song nor ever hear it again. But there are never any commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1988 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Rolling Stone magazine's annual critics poll has a strong track record over the last decade when it comes to spotlighting new talent. Among the distinguished selections for best new American band: R.E.M. and Los Lobos. So, the eager crowd Monday night at Bogart's in Long Beach expected big things when the magazine's latest nomination for best new band stepped on stage shortly after midnight. That's not the best way to approach a show by the Silos.
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