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Delbert Mann

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The golden age of live television lasted hardly more than a decade--from 1948 until roughly 1958, when tape began to take over. But some of the talented producers, directors, writers and actors who began to work in those infancy of the medium are still--40 years later--continuing to fill our days and nights. Delbert Mann had never possessed a television set when he went to New York in April, 1949, and became a floor manager at NBC.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Susan King
"Ma, sooner or later, there comes a point in a man's life where he's gotta face some facts. And one fact I gotta face is that, whatever it is that women like, I ain't got it. " - Marty Piletti (Ernest Borgnine) in the 1955 Oscar winner "Marty" On May 24, 1953, NBC's "Goodyear Television Playhouse" aired Paddy Chayefsky's transcendent drama "Marty," starring Rod Steiger as a lonely Bronx butcher who finds love with a shy, plain woman (Nancy Marchand). Running just 51 minutes, the live telecast directed by Delbert Mann became one of the triumphs of the Golden Age of television in the 1950s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Delbert Mann, who directed the acclaimed live TV production of "Marty," Paddy Chayefsky's classic tale of a lonely Bronx butcher, and then won an Academy Award directing the 1955 movie version, has died. He was 87. Mann, a former president of the Directors Guild of America, died of pneumonia Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his son Fred said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ernest Borgnine seemed born to play the heavy when he burst onto the Hollywood scene as "Fatso" Judson, a sadistic stockade sergeant who viciously beats a private to death in the 1953 movie "From Here to Eternity. " But two years later came the title role in "Marty," where the stocky, gap-toothed Borgnine defied typecasting and earned recognition as a versatile actor by inhabiting the part of a lonely Bronx butcher looking for love. He went on to a prolific seven-decade career in film and television, moving easily from scoundrels and serious portrayals to a comedic role on the 1960s TV sitcom "McHale's Navy" and a spate of grandfatherly parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1997
I feel very remiss that I failed to mention Delbert Mann in the list of live television greats ("The Mature Candidate," Calendar, Aug. 21). Delbert has been an inspiration to me all my life as well as one of my best friends. He is also a brilliant director. JOHN FRANKENHEIMER, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2009 | By Susan King
When the small screen was in its infancy in the 1950s, a group of young, scrappy writers such as Rod Serling, JP Miller, Reginald Rose and Paddy Chayefsky and directors such as John Frankenheimer, Alex Segal, Delbert Mann, Franklin Schaffner, Sidney Lumet and George Roy Hill collaborated on a series of live television dramas that set the gold standard for the fledgling medium. FOR THE RECORD: 'The Golden Age of Television': A DVD review in Saturday's Calendar on "The Golden Age of Television" misstated "A Wind From the South" director Daniel Petrie's first name as Donald, and misidentified the director of "Requiem for a Heavyweight," Ralph Nelson, as John Frankenheimer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ernest Borgnine seemed born to play the heavy when he burst onto the Hollywood scene as "Fatso" Judson, a sadistic stockade sergeant who viciously beats a private to death in the 1953 movie "From Here to Eternity. " But two years later came the title role in "Marty," where the stocky, gap-toothed Borgnine defied typecasting and earned recognition as a versatile actor by inhabiting the part of a lonely Bronx butcher looking for love. He went on to a prolific seven-decade career in film and television, moving easily from scoundrels and serious portrayals to a comedic role on the 1960s TV sitcom "McHale's Navy" and a spate of grandfatherly parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Susan King
"Ma, sooner or later, there comes a point in a man's life where he's gotta face some facts. And one fact I gotta face is that, whatever it is that women like, I ain't got it. " - Marty Piletti (Ernest Borgnine) in the 1955 Oscar winner "Marty" On May 24, 1953, NBC's "Goodyear Television Playhouse" aired Paddy Chayefsky's transcendent drama "Marty," starring Rod Steiger as a lonely Bronx butcher who finds love with a shy, plain woman (Nancy Marchand). Running just 51 minutes, the live telecast directed by Delbert Mann became one of the triumphs of the Golden Age of television in the 1950s.
NEWS
December 19, 1987
An obituary in Friday's editions credited Denis Sanders with directing the 1956 television special "The Day Lincoln Was Shot." Delbert Mann was the director; Sanders and his brother, Terry, wrote the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Remembering Capra: Actor James Stewart will be among those paying tribute to director Frank Capra at a public memorial service Saturday at 1 p.m. at the Directors Guild of America Theater in West Hollywood. Film clips from Capra's movies will be screened and other colleagues sharing remembrances will include Sheldon Leonard, Delbert Mann, Stanley Kramer, Jane Wyatt, Hal Kanter and Jane Wyman. Capra died Sept. 3 at age 94.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2009 | By Susan King
When the small screen was in its infancy in the 1950s, a group of young, scrappy writers such as Rod Serling, JP Miller, Reginald Rose and Paddy Chayefsky and directors such as John Frankenheimer, Alex Segal, Delbert Mann, Franklin Schaffner, Sidney Lumet and George Roy Hill collaborated on a series of live television dramas that set the gold standard for the fledgling medium. FOR THE RECORD: 'The Golden Age of Television': A DVD review in Saturday's Calendar on "The Golden Age of Television" misstated "A Wind From the South" director Daniel Petrie's first name as Donald, and misidentified the director of "Requiem for a Heavyweight," Ralph Nelson, as John Frankenheimer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Delbert Mann, who directed the acclaimed live TV production of "Marty," Paddy Chayefsky's classic tale of a lonely Bronx butcher, and then won an Academy Award directing the 1955 movie version, has died. He was 87. Mann, a former president of the Directors Guild of America, died of pneumonia Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his son Fred said Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1997
I feel very remiss that I failed to mention Delbert Mann in the list of live television greats ("The Mature Candidate," Calendar, Aug. 21). Delbert has been an inspiration to me all my life as well as one of my best friends. He is also a brilliant director. JOHN FRANKENHEIMER, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The golden age of live television lasted hardly more than a decade--from 1948 until roughly 1958, when tape began to take over. But some of the talented producers, directors, writers and actors who began to work in those infancy of the medium are still--40 years later--continuing to fill our days and nights. Delbert Mann had never possessed a television set when he went to New York in April, 1949, and became a floor manager at NBC.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1987
Academy Award-winning director Delbert Mann ("Marty") has donated a collection of 16-millimeter prints of his motion pictures and television programs to the UCLA Film and Television Archive. Among the feature films are "Separate Tables," "The Bachelor Party" and "That Touch of Mink." Television prints include "Philco-Goodyear Playhouse" productions and such movies as "Heidi" and "Breaking Up."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1985
The life of English novelist Charlotte Bronte is depicted in "Bronte," a one-woman show starring Julie Harris and having its television premiere Sept. 6 on KCET Channel 28 (9-10:30 p.). As the story unfolds, Harris also tells of Charlotte's sisters, Emily and Anne, and their life with their austere clergyman father and dissolute brother. The script is by William Luce, who also wrote "The Belle of Amherst" starring Harris as Emily Dickinson.
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