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Delivery Workers

NEWS
January 14, 1996 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lu Dale sails safely into port after weeks at sea. The sadness descends like soft rain. It's not a serious affliction, merely a longing for the sea. Dale, a professional skipper, is hit with it at the close of every voyage. Adventure ends, civilization looms. But Dale, of Costa Mesa, desires only the deep blue. As a yacht delivery captain, Dale, 52, is paid to sail others' boats over long, sometimes treacherous passages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1996 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the roar of the downtown rush hour, a bus's horn blares at John Harrelson as he swerves his bike across its path toward the courthouse steps. Safely on the sidewalk, Harrelson shakes a finger at the driver as he charges into the building to deliver a stack of court documents before the business day ends. "What? Am I invisible?" he shouts. "Nobody respects us messengers downtown," said the 25-year-old Harrelson.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So you're a private person. Real private. Even your next-door neighbors don't have a clue what you do once you slip out and point your car toward the freeway. When you return from work, same story. If people want to know anything about you, let them hire a private eye. Or they could save a bundle by just chatting up your letter carrier, UPS man, FedEx woman or bottled-water delivery person. Chances are, these people could run rings around any gumshoe fresh to the case.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | LISA M. HAMM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Their caps boast: "We Deliver." And despite a Price Waterhouse survey ranking Puerto Rico the worst in the nation for on-time delivery, postal carriers on the island say they really do. It's just that cultural and language barriers--resulting in incorrect address formats that confuse sorting equipment--slow them down. Postal carrier Hector Quintero takes off his navy cap to mop a sweaty brow, and waves an envelope that illustrates his frustration. "See? Here's the biggest problem," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1994 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 28-year-old newspaper deliverer was killed Monday when his pickup truck jumped a curb on Coast Highway and crashed into a chocolate store, on a curve that has been the scene of repeated accidents, city officials and store owners said. Tim John Voss of Laguna Hills was treated at the scene of the accident in the 200 block of Coast Highway and taken to South Coast Medical Center in Laguna Beach, where he died at 5 a.m., Sgt. Greg Bartz said.
NEWS
September 12, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Teamsters unanimously rejected the latest contract offer by Lucky Stores, increasing the chance of a strike by the 1,695 workers who warehouse and deliver goods to the chain's 235 supermarkets throughout Southern California, the union reported Sunday. However, at the behest of a federal mediator, both sides continued to meet late Sunday, and Teamsters leaders told their members to report to work as usual today.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ and ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The concept of time saved--perhaps one of the most precious commodities of American culture today--has become a marketing ploy used by everyone from airlines to pizza makers. Now it has come back to haunt one of the companies most closely linked with it. Domino's Pizza, the nation's No. 1 pizza delivery chain--which built its reputation on a 30-minute guarantee--scrapped its quick-delivery promise Tuesday. The move was prompted by a jury award last week of nearly $79 million to a St.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ and ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The concept of time saved--perhaps one of the most precious commodities of American culture today--has become a marketing ploy used by everyone from airlines to pizza makers. Now it has come back to haunt one of the companies most closely linked with it. Domino's Pizza, the nation's No. 1 pizza delivery chain--which built its reputation on a 30-minute guarantee--scrapped its quick-delivery promise Tuesday. The move was prompted by a jury award last week of nearly $79 million to a St.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1993 | SCOTT SANDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, 42-year-old Gary Diamond might seem slightly out of place on the streets of Westwood in his blue and red Domino's uniform. Delivering pizza, as portrayed in the TV ads, is strictly a young man's game. "I guess I don't exactly fit the image, but most of the drivers around here don't," said Diamond, who signed on as a driver about six years ago after the Compton warehouse that employed him closed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1993 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Val Stiefel delivers pizzas, he not only gets there fast, he looks fast getting there. Stiefel, 19, cruises on his rounds in a 1986 fire-red Porsche 944. "I've gotten my share of comments," said the Laguna Hills teen, who got the hot wheels from his mother two years ago when she bought a new car. "They say things like, 'You only see things like this down here' " in Orange County.
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