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Dementia

NEWS
July 5, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The woman, a 65-year-old former psychologist diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease, was not always able to understand traffic signs. But her physician thought that she could probably still drive, so long as she stayed in her own familiar neighborhood and used her car for such simple activities as grocery shopping and going to church. One day, she risked a trip downtown. Lost, confused and disoriented, she misinterpreted a red light and drove straight into a busy intersection.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison and Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Nobody disputes that 85-year-old Lorraine Sullivan steered her Toyota Corolla into oncoming traffic, causing a crash that killed her longtime boyfriend, who was in the front passenger seat. But she is not the one in a Santa Ana courtroom this week facing a wrongful death lawsuit for the 2010 accident. Her doctor is. Dr. Arthur Daigneault, who practices near the retirement community of Laguna Woods Village and caters to the elderly, is being sued by the family of William Powers.
HEALTH
March 13, 2012 | By Lisa Zamosky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My 82-year-old mother has been accusing family members of spying on her, listening in on her phone conversations and entering her home when she's not there, among other things, off and on for about 10 years. She told her doctor she won't talk with us. Is there anything we can do? Are there resources and/or free counseling services to help us work out issues with our mom so we can talk with her doctor? You can try to contact your mom's doctor to discuss her condition, particularly given that you're concerned she may be suffering from dementia and unable to properly care for herself.
HEALTH
February 7, 2005 | From Reuters
Music, pets and aromatherapy should be used to calm agitated or delusional patients before drugs that often prove ineffective or have harmful side effects are turned to, researchers said. After evaluating 29 studies dating to the mid-1960s, researchers at Wake Forest University said "it was discouraging to find that we currently don't have good drug therapies" for dementia-related behaviors.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Susan Strong Davis, an 87-year-old widow, spends the day inside her Palos Verdes Estates home, tended round-the-clock by nurse's aides. For company, relatives say, she has her dog, the television and, on increasingly rare occasions, memories of the glamorous socialite's life she once lived. "She definitely has some sort of dementia," said Viki Brushwood, a niece who visited from Texas in December. "I don't know if it's Alzheimer's or what. She is somebody who is not making decisions anymore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2012 | Steve Lopez
"Hello Mr. Lopez, I would very much like to meet with you. I think you will find that I have some pertinent things to say. " The email was from Dr. Arthur Rivin, 89, professor emeritus of medicine at UCLA. Rivin said he had been diagnosed in September 2009 with Alzheimer's disease, but then, something rare and amazing had happened. Using a program of therapy he developed himself, he claimed, he was now greatly improved. If I took the time to meet with him and hear all about it, Rivin suggested, together "we will do something big!"
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Getting angry is no way to help someone who has Alzheimer's disease or some other form of dementia, but it's a natural reaction to behavior that is unexpected, disturbing and difficult to manage. So is the guilt that inevitably follows an outburst of anger directed at someone who is helpless. If you are caring for a loved one suffering from dementia, you've no doubt encountered the kinds of difficulties that Debra Lynn Cherry, program director of the Alzheimer's Assn.
OPINION
May 20, 2012
People generally don't think of the elderly as nuisance neighbors. They rarely throw loud late-night parties, play loud music or have loud sex. Nevertheless, the issue of elderly group homes is a controversial one in single-family neighborhoods. On a stretch of leafy Sierra Bonita Avenue near Hollywood, an operator of board-and-care facilities wants to tear down a duplex and construct an 11-bed facility for elderly residents suffering from dementia. In theory, that's fine: According to state law, a city cannot prohibit licensed care facilities that meet the zoning requirements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1995 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contending that he suffered from a mental impairment called "dementia" for four years before his bad investments pushed Orange County into bankruptcy, former Treasurer-Tax Collector Robert L. Citron demanded access Monday to any evidence gathered by county prosecutors that might persuade a judge to sentence him to probation.
SCIENCE
December 30, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Well before signs of dementia trigger a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, a person's cholesterol levels may be a bellwether of amyloid plaque build-up in the brain, a new study finds. Long considered a reliable predictor of heart attacks and strokes, worrisome cholesterol levels may now raise concerns about dementia risk as well, prompting more aggressive use of drugs, including statins, that alter cholesterol levels. The current study does "not convincingly exclude the possibility" that taking statins might lower amyloid deposition, the researchers said.
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