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July 5, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The woman, a 65-year-old former psychologist diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease, was not always able to understand traffic signs. But her physician thought that she could probably still drive, so long as she stayed in her own familiar neighborhood and used her car for such simple activities as grocery shopping and going to church. One day, she risked a trip downtown. Lost, confused and disoriented, she misinterpreted a red light and drove straight into a busy intersection.
September 7, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison and Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Nobody disputes that 85-year-old Lorraine Sullivan steered her Toyota Corolla into oncoming traffic, causing a crash that killed her longtime boyfriend, who was in the front passenger seat. But she is not the one in a Santa Ana courtroom this week facing a wrongful death lawsuit for the 2010 accident. Her doctor is. Dr. Arthur Daigneault, who practices near the retirement community of Laguna Woods Village and caters to the elderly, is being sued by the family of William Powers.
March 13, 2012 | By Lisa Zamosky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My 82-year-old mother has been accusing family members of spying on her, listening in on her phone conversations and entering her home when she's not there, among other things, off and on for about 10 years. She told her doctor she won't talk with us. Is there anything we can do? Are there resources and/or free counseling services to help us work out issues with our mom so we can talk with her doctor? You can try to contact your mom's doctor to discuss her condition, particularly given that you're concerned she may be suffering from dementia and unable to properly care for herself.
April 9, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Susan Strong Davis, an 87-year-old widow, spends the day inside her Palos Verdes Estates home, tended round-the-clock by nurse's aides. For company, relatives say, she has her dog, the television and, on increasingly rare occasions, memories of the glamorous socialite's life she once lived. "She definitely has some sort of dementia," said Viki Brushwood, a niece who visited from Texas in December. "I don't know if it's Alzheimer's or what. She is somebody who is not making decisions anymore.
Getting angry is no way to help someone who has Alzheimer's disease or some other form of dementia, but it's a natural reaction to behavior that is unexpected, disturbing and difficult to manage. So is the guilt that inevitably follows an outburst of anger directed at someone who is helpless. If you are caring for a loved one suffering from dementia, you've no doubt encountered the kinds of difficulties that Debra Lynn Cherry, program director of the Alzheimer's Assn.
May 20, 2012
People generally don't think of the elderly as nuisance neighbors. They rarely throw loud late-night parties, play loud music or have loud sex. Nevertheless, the issue of elderly group homes is a controversial one in single-family neighborhoods. On a stretch of leafy Sierra Bonita Avenue near Hollywood, an operator of board-and-care facilities wants to tear down a duplex and construct an 11-bed facility for elderly residents suffering from dementia. In theory, that's fine: According to state law, a city cannot prohibit licensed care facilities that meet the zoning requirements.
Contending that he suffered from a mental impairment called "dementia" for four years before his bad investments pushed Orange County into bankruptcy, former Treasurer-Tax Collector Robert L. Citron demanded access Monday to any evidence gathered by county prosecutors that might persuade a judge to sentence him to probation.
October 26, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Heavy smoking in middle age more than doubles the risk of Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia later in life, according to one of the first long-term studies to examine the issue. Smoking has a clear effect on the heart and lungs, but whether it also damages the brain has been controversial. The study, published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine, overcomes some of the obstacles that have made it difficult to assess such a link. For example, some previous research suggesting that smoking doesn't cause dementia mostly examined elderly people only for a short period of time.
July 8, 2011 | By Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times
John Mackey, who helped revolutionize the NFL's tight end position and whose post-football struggles with dementia became emblematic of the brutality of the game, has died. He was 69. Mackey died Wednesday in Baltimore after a 10-year battle with frontal temporal dementia, the Baltimore Sun reported. A former president of the NFL Players Assn., Mackey spent 10 seasons with the Baltimore Colts and San Diego Chargers, catching 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 touchdowns — including a 75-yard score on a tipped ball to help lift the Colts over the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl V in 1971.
September 19, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
A UC San Francisco neurologist working to crack the mysteries of early-onset dementia and a Marin County poet known for her spare, often witty verses are among the 22 winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius" grants. Each winner will receive $500,000 over the next five years to use however they choose. Established in 1981, the prestigious prizes recognize originality and the potential for important future work in a wide array of sciences, arts and social activism. Among this year's other MacArthur recipients are a New Jersey silversmith who restores medieval treasures, a Massachusetts psychologist working to lower suicide rates and a North Carolina researcher who has made key advances in the diagnosis and treatment of sports-related concussions.
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