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Dementia

NATIONAL
August 30, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Women who have their ovaries removed before menopause run a heightened risk of developing dementia or other mental problems later in life -- unless they take estrogen until age 50, a new study suggests. Experts said the research needed to be confirmed by further study, but the findings suggest another issue for premenopausal women and their doctors to discuss as they consider ovary removal.
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NEWS
July 5, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The woman, a 65-year-old former psychologist diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease, was not always able to understand traffic signs. But her physician thought that she could probably still drive, so long as she stayed in her own familiar neighborhood and used her car for such simple activities as grocery shopping and going to church. One day, she risked a trip downtown. Lost, confused and disoriented, she misinterpreted a red light and drove straight into a busy intersection.
HEALTH
March 13, 2012 | By Lisa Zamosky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My 82-year-old mother has been accusing family members of spying on her, listening in on her phone conversations and entering her home when she's not there, among other things, off and on for about 10 years. She told her doctor she won't talk with us. Is there anything we can do? Are there resources and/or free counseling services to help us work out issues with our mom so we can talk with her doctor? You can try to contact your mom's doctor to discuss her condition, particularly given that you're concerned she may be suffering from dementia and unable to properly care for herself.
HEALTH
February 7, 2005 | From Reuters
Music, pets and aromatherapy should be used to calm agitated or delusional patients before drugs that often prove ineffective or have harmful side effects are turned to, researchers said. After evaluating 29 studies dating to the mid-1960s, researchers at Wake Forest University said "it was discouraging to find that we currently don't have good drug therapies" for dementia-related behaviors.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Susan Strong Davis, an 87-year-old widow, spends the day inside her Palos Verdes Estates home, tended round-the-clock by nurse's aides. For company, relatives say, she has her dog, the television and, on increasingly rare occasions, memories of the glamorous socialite's life she once lived. "She definitely has some sort of dementia," said Viki Brushwood, a niece who visited from Texas in December. "I don't know if it's Alzheimer's or what. She is somebody who is not making decisions anymore.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Getting angry is no way to help someone who has Alzheimer's disease or some other form of dementia, but it's a natural reaction to behavior that is unexpected, disturbing and difficult to manage. So is the guilt that inevitably follows an outburst of anger directed at someone who is helpless. If you are caring for a loved one suffering from dementia, you've no doubt encountered the kinds of difficulties that Debra Lynn Cherry, program director of the Alzheimer's Assn.
OPINION
May 20, 2012
People generally don't think of the elderly as nuisance neighbors. They rarely throw loud late-night parties, play loud music or have loud sex. Nevertheless, the issue of elderly group homes is a controversial one in single-family neighborhoods. On a stretch of leafy Sierra Bonita Avenue near Hollywood, an operator of board-and-care facilities wants to tear down a duplex and construct an 11-bed facility for elderly residents suffering from dementia. In theory, that's fine: According to state law, a city cannot prohibit licensed care facilities that meet the zoning requirements.
HEALTH
February 9, 2004 | From Reuters
Nursing home residents who are injured by other residents often may be mentally impaired people who wander into others' "personal space," according to a public health study. "Injured residents were more likely, perhaps unknowingly, to 'put themselves in harm's way,' be verbally aggressive and be cognitively impaired," wrote Tomoko Shinoda-Tagawa of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston in a study released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1995 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contending that he suffered from a mental impairment called "dementia" for four years before his bad investments pushed Orange County into bankruptcy, former Treasurer-Tax Collector Robert L. Citron demanded access Monday to any evidence gathered by county prosecutors that might persuade a judge to sentence him to probation.
HEALTH
October 26, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Heavy smoking in middle age more than doubles the risk of Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia later in life, according to one of the first long-term studies to examine the issue. Smoking has a clear effect on the heart and lungs, but whether it also damages the brain has been controversial. The study, published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine, overcomes some of the obstacles that have made it difficult to assess such a link. For example, some previous research suggesting that smoking doesn't cause dementia mostly examined elderly people only for a short period of time.
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