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Dementia

NATIONAL
August 30, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Women who have their ovaries removed before menopause run a heightened risk of developing dementia or other mental problems later in life -- unless they take estrogen until age 50, a new study suggests. Experts said the research needed to be confirmed by further study, but the findings suggest another issue for premenopausal women and their doctors to discuss as they consider ovary removal.
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HEALTH
March 13, 2012 | By Lisa Zamosky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My 82-year-old mother has been accusing family members of spying on her, listening in on her phone conversations and entering her home when she's not there, among other things, off and on for about 10 years. She told her doctor she won't talk with us. Is there anything we can do? Are there resources and/or free counseling services to help us work out issues with our mom so we can talk with her doctor? You can try to contact your mom's doctor to discuss her condition, particularly given that you're concerned she may be suffering from dementia and unable to properly care for herself.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The woman, a 65-year-old former psychologist diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease, was not always able to understand traffic signs. But her physician thought that she could probably still drive, so long as she stayed in her own familiar neighborhood and used her car for such simple activities as grocery shopping and going to church. One day, she risked a trip downtown. Lost, confused and disoriented, she misinterpreted a red light and drove straight into a busy intersection.
OPINION
July 20, 2003 | Karin Klein, Karin Klein is an editorial writer for The Times.
The day I had been dreading came in the spring of 2000, about three years after my mother's diagnosis with Alzheimer's disease. She sat in my house and tearfully announced that she did not know who I was or where she was. When I introduced myself, she apologized, saying she must have been a terrible mother. It took me a moment to follow her line of thought: Because she had no memory of me, she assumed that we were estranged and that she was seeing me for the first time in decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison and Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Nobody disputes that 85-year-old Lorraine Sullivan steered her Toyota Corolla into oncoming traffic, causing a crash that killed her longtime boyfriend, who was in the front passenger seat. But she is not the one in a Santa Ana courtroom this week facing a wrongful death lawsuit for the 2010 accident. Her doctor is. Dr. Arthur Daigneault, who practices near the retirement community of Laguna Woods Village and caters to the elderly, is being sued by the family of William Powers.
SCIENCE
June 21, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Elderly people who frequently read, do crossword puzzles, practice a musical instrument or play board games cut their risk of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia by nearly two-thirds compared with people who seldom do such activities, researchers reported in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine. The study showed that volunteers who did crossword puzzles four days a week had a risk of dementia nearly half that of subjects who did puzzles weekly.
HEALTH
January 17, 2005 | From Reuters
Weight loss in elderly men appears to be a harbinger of dementia and a contributing factor in their increasing frailty. Although preventing weight loss is unlikely to prevent mental decline, maintaining weight may help stave off the physical dependence on other people and the falls and poor wound healing that can accompany old age, said a report published in the January issue of Archives of Neurology journal.
HEALTH
February 7, 2005 | From Reuters
Music, pets and aromatherapy should be used to calm agitated or delusional patients before drugs that often prove ineffective or have harmful side effects are turned to, researchers said. After evaluating 29 studies dating to the mid-1960s, researchers at Wake Forest University said "it was discouraging to find that we currently don't have good drug therapies" for dementia-related behaviors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000
The state Department of Health Services has forced a local facility for dementia patients to change its procedures because of complaints against UC Irvine medical professors performing research there. The researchers were taking samples from the noses and rectums of patients without their consent or that of their guardians. The samples were part of a project to check for the spread of germs resistant to antibiotics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Susan Strong Davis, an 87-year-old widow, spends the day inside her Palos Verdes Estates home, tended round-the-clock by nurse's aides. For company, relatives say, she has her dog, the television and, on increasingly rare occasions, memories of the glamorous socialite's life she once lived. "She definitely has some sort of dementia," said Viki Brushwood, a niece who visited from Texas in December. "I don't know if it's Alzheimer's or what. She is somebody who is not making decisions anymore.
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