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WORLD
December 8, 2008 | Associated Press
Thailand's main opposition party formally requested an emergency parliament session today to prove its majority and form the next government. This Southeast Asian nation has been gripped by political chaos for three months, with protesters seizing the prime minister's office and overrunning the capital's two airports for about a week in a bid to topple the government, accusing it of being a proxy of fugitive former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. The country's No.
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
HONOLULU - In primaries across the country - in Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi and other states - Republicans are locked in a heart-and-soul battle between purists and pragmatists clashing over what it means to represent the party, its philosophy and core values. Here in Hawaii there's a similar fight over power and purpose, but this one is between Democrats. It's a fight for a U.S. Senate seat, a rare enough prize in a state that has elected just six people senator since statehood in 1959.
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NEWS
July 28, 1986 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Thai voters Sunday spread their parliamentary choices among a welter of competing parties, setting the stage for another coalition government here. The favored Democrat Party won the largest number of seats, capturing 101 of the 347 contested positions in the lower house of Parliament, according to unofficial returns this morning. The voter turnout in Bangkok and elsewhere appeared even lighter than the 55% predicted for the country. Election officials put the Bangkok turnout at 37%.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Democrats struggling to combat a flood of outside money pouring in to defeat their candidates have found at least a temporary solution: If you can't beat them, brand them. The latest strategy of Democratic messaging is tying Republican candidates and policies to the party's most prominent - and at times vilified - financial patrons, billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) initiated the strategy last month when he decried the brothers - whose last name is pronounced "coke" - from the Senate floor as "shadowy billionaires" and "un-American.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
A massive protest against the government of Thailand on Monday occupied seven key intersections in teeming Bangkok, paralyzing traffic in the city of 12 million and forcing schools and businesses to close, news agencies reported. Though the demonstrators demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra were mostly peaceful, the vows of a radical opposition segment to shut down the stock exchange and air traffic control in the tourism-dependent country stirred fears that the protests and economic disruption would escalate.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2007 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Will President Bush put the "-ic" back in "Democratic"? That was the hot topic around Washington on Monday after the president was asked why, during his State of the Union address last week, he referred to Congress' new "Democrat majority." "That was an oversight," Bush said in an interview Monday with National Public Radio. "I'm not trying to needle.... I didn't even know I did it." The issue of whether it is a slur to refer to the Democratic Party without the "-ic" has become an irritant.
WORLD
March 21, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Thailand's constitutional court Friday nullified the Feb. 2 election won by supporters of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra amid an opposition boycott, prolonging the country's 4-month-old political crisis and threatening a deeper toll on its tourism-dependent economy. Opposition supporters celebrated the 6-3 court ruling that said the vote was invalid because not all polls were open to receive voters on the same day. Antigovernment protesters had blocked registration in 28 constituencies, forcing election workers to delay voting at the affected polls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992 | GIL FERGUSON, Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) represents the 70th District. and
Some Republicans, with obvious media encouragement, appear bent on damaging, if not permanently splitting the Republican Party over the issue of abortion. In contrast to their followers, those leading this fratricidal attack apparently know that it can only benefit the Democrat Party and media elitists. Why are some Republicans doing this to their own party? Abortion should not be a partisan issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1995 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Efforts to determine who aided a Huntington Beach woman's improper attempt to get on the ballot in the 67th Assembly District race intensified Friday as the District Attorney's office and the Democratic Party announced they are moving ahead with separate investigations. Both the Democrats and the District Attorney's office are seeking to question Laurie Campbell of Huntington Beach, whose name was stricken from the ballot last week by a Superior Court judge.
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | ALAN C. MILLER and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Democratic Party donor Johnny Chung detailed for a congressional committee Tuesday his odyssey from obscure Torrance entrepreneur to middle man for contributions from the Chinese government, telling lawmakers, "please keep in mind that I didn't create this system, you did." In testimony before the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee, Chung revealed that he received more than $2 million from 1994 to 1996 from various Chinese investors.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli and David Lauter
WASHINGTON - Faced with a strong prospect of losing control of the Senate in November, Democrats have begun a high-stakes effort to try to overcome one of their party's big weaknesses: voters who don't show up for midterm elections. The party's Senate campaign committee plans to spend $60 million to boost turnout. That's nine times what it spent in the last midterm election, in 2010. The Democratic National Committee has begun to make the sophisticated data analysis tools developed to target voters in the 2012 presidential campaign available to all the party's candidates.
WORLD
March 21, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Thailand's constitutional court Friday nullified the Feb. 2 election won by supporters of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra amid an opposition boycott, prolonging the country's 4-month-old political crisis and threatening a deeper toll on its tourism-dependent economy. Opposition supporters celebrated the 6-3 court ruling that said the vote was invalid because not all polls were open to receive voters on the same day. Antigovernment protesters had blocked registration in 28 constituencies, forcing election workers to delay voting at the affected polls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Johanna Neuman
Robert S. Strauss, a one-time chairman of the Democratic National Committee and a Washington insider who combined earthy Texas charm with raw political power, died Wednesday. He was 95. A spokesman for Strauss' Washington law firm, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, confirmed his death but would release no other details. A U.S. trade representative in the Carter administration, Strauss was a poker-playing, cigar-chomping, power-lunch-eating rainmaker who was so successful at recruiting mega-clients that he stopped billing by the hour in the 1970s.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The young are different from you and me - unless, of course, you happen to be one of them. If you're older than 34, I'm sorry to break it to you, but you're no longer the wave of the future. That distinction belongs to those born between 1980 and 2002, dubbed the "millennial generation" because they began to come of age at the turn of the century. They've grown up, most of them have found jobs (although that hasn't been easy) and they're a bigger, more powerful part of the electorate every year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Jean Merl
Politicking at the California Democratic Party Convention by candidates competing for official endorsements continued Saturday morning after delegate-hunting at a round of parties the night before. Volunteers started with pep talks and breakfast at "boiler rooms" set up at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles by Assembly Speaker John A. Perez and state Sen. Alex Padilla, who are running for state controller and secretary of state, respectively. With balloting for the party's endorsement scheduled for later in the day, time was running out as the two Los Angeles officeholders and their competitors rushed from one caucus to another, hoping to sway those who would be voting on whom the party should endorse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Jean Merl
Organized chaos reigned Saturday afternoon as delegates of the California Democratic Party began casting their endorsement ballots in races featuring more than one Democrat vying for the party's backing. Cheering sections for state Sen. Alex Padilla of Pacoima, who is running for secretary of state, and Assembly Speaker John A. Pérez of Los Angeles, who is campaigning for state controller, raucously greeted delegates as they arrived at the balloting area at the Los Angeles Convention Center.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're back: End affirmative action. Punish flag desecration. Halt funding for the arts. Bring back prayer in the schools. Like tulips in springtime, these divisive social issues are popping up all over Capitol Hill. But when the "culture war" resumes in full force in Congress, do not be misled by the angry rhetoric from either side. In fact, many lawmakers are hardly unhappy over the resurgence of such controversies.
OPINION
February 3, 2007
Re "The 'Democrat majority' is still the talk of the town," Jan. 30 Only "Republicons" refer to the Democratic Party as the "Democrat" Party. These are the hard-right-wing party hacks who do not have the courtesy to refer to a major American political party by its correct name -- the Democratic Party. When President Bush stoops to that sophomoric level, he comes across as just one more "Republicon." GENE BURKARD San Diego I don't like "democratic" as an adjective when describing the Democrat Party because it infers that the Republican Party isn't democratic.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
Hillary Rodham Clinton will not announce for months whether she will run for president, but as she arrived in California for events this week the machinery of a campaign was cranking into gear around her. The Ready for Hillary "super PAC," created to encourage her candidacy, will launch a website this week that could serve as the framework for an eventual campaign to organize supporters across the 50 states. The leaders of another super PAC, Priorities USA Action, have been meeting on the West Coast with a select group of donors, seeking six- and seven-figure pledges (and in some cases checks)
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
A massive protest against the government of Thailand on Monday occupied seven key intersections in teeming Bangkok, paralyzing traffic in the city of 12 million and forcing schools and businesses to close, news agencies reported. Though the demonstrators demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra were mostly peaceful, the vows of a radical opposition segment to shut down the stock exchange and air traffic control in the tourism-dependent country stirred fears that the protests and economic disruption would escalate.
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