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Democratic National Convention

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NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak and John Hoeffel
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has been selected chairman of this summer's Democratic National Convention, elevating his role as a surrogate in the Latino community and raising his national profile at a time Villaraigosa considers his political future. A formal announcement was scheduled Wednesday in Washington, with the mayor planning to join President Obama on Wednesday night for a presidential fundraiser in Los Angeles. As convention chairman, Villaraigosa will wield the gavel during the event in Charlotte, N.C., which opens with a festival on Sept.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2012 | Times staff and wire reports
Lawrence Guyot, a civil rights leader who was threatened, jailed and nearly beaten to death in the Deep South in the 1960s and helped lead a drive to register black voters during the tumultuous Freedom Summer of 1964, has died. He was 73. The longtime activist, who had a history of heart problems and diabetes, died at home Thursday in Mount Rainier, Md., according to his daughter, Julie Guyot-Diangone. A Mississippi native, Guyot was one of the original members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and served as director of the 1964 Freedom Summer Project in Hattiesburg, Miss.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
The multi-channel miniseries called "The Democratic National Convention" got underway Tuesday night in Charlotte, N.C. Unlike the comparable Republican miniseries, which was subject to some rescheduling (though not, really, shortening) due to the late-breaking news that was Hurricane Isaac, it has been planned from the start to last only three nights. In Charlotte, as in Tampa, much of the convention takes place out of view. The networks' disinclination to air more than an hour of it any night seemingly has been justified by the low ratings for last week's GOP meet, though ratings should not be what decides such coverage.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2012 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democratic convention organizers broke their pledge to put on their quadrennial gathering in Charlotte, N.C., this year without corporate donations, using $5 million from a committee financed by companies such as Bank of America, Duke Energy and AT&T to rent the Time Warner Arena for the three-day event. The payments, revealed in reports filed Wednesday evening with the Federal Election Commission, came after party officials said they would produce the convention without corporate money, a self-imposed ban set by the Democratic National Committee.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- The list of Democrats skipping the party's upcoming national convention in Charlotte, N.C., grew Tuesday, with Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) confirming that she will not attend the convention in favor of spending time with voters. "Generally speaking, Claire has not gone to the national convention when she is on the ballot because she believes it's important to spend as much time as possible in the state of Missouri talking with voters,” a McCaskill aide said. McCaskill, who has served in the Senate since 2007, held a prominent speaking slot during the 2008 Democratic National Convention, addressing the crowd immediately prior to Michelle Obama.
NEWS
July 20, 1988 | Associated Press
According to overnight Nielsen ratings from the 16 biggest television markets, significantly fewer Americans watched live network coverage of the first night of the Democratic National Convention compared with 1984. That continues the downward trend that began in 1980. ABC and NBC tied for Monday with a rating of 6.7 and a 12 share. The rating does not include the 30-minute early start for NBC, only the 9-11 p.m. EDT period when all three major networks were on the air simultaneously.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget Mario M. Cuomo or Ann Richards, keynoters of conventions past. The main speaker for the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles will be a 30-year-old congressman from Memphis who is virtually unknown in national politics. Meet Harold E. Ford Jr., the son of Tennessee's first African American congressman. He won his father's seat in 1996, becoming the youngest member of Congress. Ebony magazine voted him one of America's most eligible bachelors. "Harold E. Ford Jr.
NEWS
July 19, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of protesters led by Atlanta City Councilman Hosea Williams and Rep. Gus Savage of Illinois marched Monday evening from the white marble crypt of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to the Omni convention hall, calling on the Rev. Jesse Jackson to walk out if he is not placed on the ticket.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, turning the corner on its final six months in office, will focus on several short-term legislative issues while pressing ahead with efforts to obtain additional assistance for Nicaragua's Contras, the White House chief of staff said Thursday. After a 3 1/2-hour meeting for which 15 key Reagan advisers, including the White House senior staff, assembled in Santa Barbara, staff chief Kenneth M.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
As they kick off their general election campaign, Democratic nominee Michael S. Dukakis and running mate Lloyd Bentsen will head for Texas and California today, hoping to generate excitement and attention in two states that will be keys to their chances of winning the general election this fall. The candidates will campaign in McAllen, Tex., then travel to Houston before arriving tonight in Stockton.
NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Alana Semuel
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - It's time to talk about love. Love among Democrats, that is. For if the refrain from the Republican National Convention went something along the lines of “we built it,” one of the more commonly used words in the Democratic National Convention might have been “love.” And how do the Democrats love? Let us count the ways. There were the particularly cheesy expressions of love Thursday night, perhaps capped by Vice President Joe Biden's very public declaration to his wife, Jill.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2012 | By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
Republicans watch this, Democrats tweet that. Data from the last two weeks of rhetoric-filled political conventions show that Americans are increasingly funneling into separate partisan media silos. Right-leaning Fox News Channel scored huge numbers during prime-time coverage of the Republican National Convention. And Democrats, during their gathering that wrapped up Thursday, raced to liberal-skewing MSNBC and filled social-media platforms with millions of comments during speeches from President Obama and others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum and David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
One day after being booed at the Democratic National Convention during an embarrassing dust-up over his party's official platform, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa delivered a high-profile speech Thursday that offered red meat to the party faithful. Villaraigosa hammered Republicans for their positions on taxes and Medicare and took aim at GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney's suggestion that cracking down on illegal immigrants would persuade many of them to leave the United States of their own will.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Four years ago, when Barack Obama gave his last speech to a Democratic National Convention, 85,000 cheering supporters under a broad Denver sky helped him ride a wave of emotion all the way to the White House. Now, as he prepares to accept his party's nomination for a second term, aides and advisors say he faces a far more difficult task. "There was less riding on that speech than now, just because there's a closer election," said David Axelrod, a longtime advisor and message guru who joined Obama on a swing through battleground states this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Meg James
It was a clash of titans, and Bill Clinton won. Wednesday night's prime-time coverage of the Democratic National Convention, which featured a fiery and finger-pointing address by former President Bill Clinton, attracted 25.1 million viewers, according to ratings giant Nielsen. The Democrats out-muscled the season opener of NFL football on NBC, which drew 23.9 million viewers. The Dallas Cowboys defeated the New York Giants on the field. The second night of the Democratic convention in Charlotte, N.C., was off slightly from the opening night of the event, which faced significantly less competition on TV.  On Tuesday night, the convention showcased Michelle Obama and drew 26.2 million viewers.  The Democratic convention continues to draw a larger audience than last week's Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. The second night of coverage of the Republican National Convention, which featured Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the GOP nominee for vice president, drew 21.94 million viewers.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
WEST LEBANON, N.H. - Mitt Romney briefly emerged from intensive debate preparations to explicitly make the argument Wednesday that has been the subtext of his campaign for months: Americans aren't better off today than they were four years ago. During a quick stop for pizza at Lui Lui restaurant in West Lebanon, Romney told the small pool of reporters he had read the texts of a number of the first-day speeches at the Democratic National Convention and...
OPINION
September 6, 2012 | Meghan Daum
At the risk of inviting legions of conservatives to swoop down and tell me I'm drowning in the Obama Kool-Aid (actually, it's not just a risk; it's a guarantee), I'm just going to come out and say it: Michelle Obama was spectacular at the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday night. She managed to do in 25 minutes what her husband has been struggling to do for nearly four years: remind us why we were once so excited about the prospect of seeing this family in the White House. Almost immediately, the speech was being called "politically masterful," "a devastating attack on Mitt Romney" and "history making.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Jubilant Democrats chanted, “Fired Up! Ready to Go!” as they streamed out of Time Warner Cable Arena late Thursday night after hearing President Obama deliver his pitch for a second term on the final night of their convention. Granted, this was a friendly crowd, so they gushed over his remarks as well as those earlier in the week by former President Clinton and First Lady Michelle Obama. But they said Obama's speech at the Democratic National Convention renewed their energy and would motivate them to work harder in what is anticipated to be a tight race with Republican nominee Mitt Romney.
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