Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDemocratic Party
IN THE NEWS

Democratic Party

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | JOHN BALZAR, Times Political Writer
He hurries to his limo on Sunset Boulevard. Traffic slows, horns honk and admirers yell: "Hey, Jesse!" He shoots them a thumbs-up. He is driven across town to Burbank, hoists himself out of the car, and office workers materialize on the sidewalk to greet him. Up goes the thumb. This is the evidence in the Rev. Jesse Jackson's life that all is well. And to those who claim otherwise, he is ready figuratively with his thumb at his nose.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
HONOLULU - In primaries across the country - in Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi and other states - Republicans are locked in a heart-and-soul battle between purists and pragmatists clashing over what it means to represent the party, its philosophy and core values. Here in Hawaii there's a similar fight over power and purpose, but this one is between Democrats. It's a fight for a U.S. Senate seat, a rare enough prize in a state that has elected just six people senator since statehood in 1959.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
ABOARD THE ROMNEY PLANE -- Mitt Romney placed the blame for Friday's weak jobs report squarely on President Obama, charging that his Democratic rival for the White House "hasn't lived up to his promises and his policies haven't worked. " "If last night was the party, this morning is the hangover," Romney said in a statement that was released as the candidate flew from New Hampshire to Iowa for a rally on Friday morning. "For every net new job created, nearly four Americans gave up looking for work entirely.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By Lanhee J. Chen
The recent defeat of an effort to reinstitute affirmative action in admissions to California's public colleges and universities demonstrates the political power of Asian American voters and challenges the conventional wisdom about their partisan loyalties. The defeat is a reminder that Asian Americans can have a decisive impact on political and policymaking processes. Perhaps more important, it suggests that if education is a key issue that drives Asian American voters, the Democratic Party may not be able to reliably count on their support in the future.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Artur Davis, one of President Obama's earliest supporters and a former co-chairman for his presidential campaign, announced Tuesday that he was leaving the Democratic Party for good. In a post published Tuesday on his website, Davis was vague about his future political endeavors, but declared: “If I were to run, it would be as a Republican. And I am in the process of changing my voter registration from Alabama to Virginia, a development which likely does represent a closing of one chapter and perhaps the opening of another.” Davis, who represented Alabama's 7th Congressional District from 2003 to 2011, was notably the first member of Congress outside of Illinois to endorse then-Sen.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By James Rainey
A bracing presidential election victory, gains in both houses of Congress and a handful of demographic and organizational realities made the argument plausible. America was becoming a “One Party Country,” a couple of political reporters argued in a well-received book. The history/polemic of George W. Bush's presidential triumphs and the hegemony of the Republican Party - written in 2006 by my former colleagues Tom Hamburger and Peter Wallsten - looks a bit ironic now, as a host of commentators argue the opposite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2013 | By Tony Perry
  SAN DIEGO -- The central committee of the San Diego County Democratic Party voted Thursday night to ask Mayor Bob Filner to resign amid the increasing number of allegations by women that he sexually harassed them. The vote, at a meeting closed to reporters, came just hours after four more women accused Filner of sexual misconduct, bringing to seven the number of women making such allegations. One of the seven has filed a lawsuit. The 70-year-old Democrat, a member of Congress for 20 years before being elected mayor in November, has said he will not resign and that he deserves due process.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Teachers unions have been the Democratic Party's foot soldiers for more than half a century, providing not only generous financial backing but an army of volunteers in return for support of their entrenched power in the nation's public schools. But this relationship is fraying, and the deterioration was evident Monday as Democrats gathered here for their national convention. A handful of teachers and parents, carrying large inflated pencils, picketed a screening of "Won't Back Down," a movie to be released this month starring Maggie Gyllenhaal and Viola Davis as mothers, one a teacher, who try to take over a failing inner-city school.
OPINION
January 1, 2011
Where did the party go? Re "Democrats are compromised to death," Opinion, Dec. 26 Neal Gabler is right: The Democratic Party represents "interests" and is no longer committed to the principles that favor the powerless. To gain a majority, it must appeal to as many progressive groups as it can without being labeled "liberal. " It is this retreat that recently led it to measures favoring the wealthy: eliminating Glass-Steagall under President Clinton, and supporting the banks and corporations under President Obama.
OPINION
February 3, 2007
Re "The 'Democrat majority' is still the talk of the town," Jan. 30 Only "Republicons" refer to the Democratic Party as the "Democrat" Party. These are the hard-right-wing party hacks who do not have the courtesy to refer to a major American political party by its correct name -- the Democratic Party. When President Bush stoops to that sophomoric level, he comes across as just one more "Republicon." GENE BURKARD San Diego I don't like "democratic" as an adjective when describing the Democrat Party because it infers that the Republican Party isn't democratic.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Democrats struggling to combat a flood of outside money pouring in to defeat their candidates have found at least a temporary solution: If you can't beat them, brand them. The latest strategy of Democratic messaging is tying Republican candidates and policies to the party's most prominent - and at times vilified - financial patrons, billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) initiated the strategy last month when he decried the brothers - whose last name is pronounced "coke" - from the Senate floor as "shadowy billionaires" and "un-American.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli and David Lauter
WASHINGTON - Faced with a strong prospect of losing control of the Senate in November, Democrats have begun a high-stakes effort to try to overcome one of their party's big weaknesses: voters who don't show up for midterm elections. The party's Senate campaign committee plans to spend $60 million to boost turnout. That's nine times what it spent in the last midterm election, in 2010. The Democratic National Committee has begun to make the sophisticated data analysis tools developed to target voters in the 2012 presidential campaign available to all the party's candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
Members of the Los Angeles County Democratic Party voted Wednesday to endorse former U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis and former state lawmaker Sheila Kuehl in the race for two open seats on the county Board of Supervisors in June's primary election. They also threw their support behind Jeffrey Prang, a West Hollywood City Council member and special assistant in the county assessor's office, in the race for assessor. But controversy arose over which candidate to back in an upcoming special election to fill the Los Angeles Unified School District board seat formerly held by Marguerite Poindexter LaMotte, who died in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
Members of the Los Angeles County Democratic Party voted Wednesday to endorse former U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis and former state lawmaker Sheila Kuehl in the race for two open seats on the county Board of Supervisors in June's primary election. They also threw their support behind Jeffrey Prang, a West Hollywood City Council member and special assistant in the county assessor's office, in the race for assessor. But controversy arose over which candidate to back in an upcoming special election to fill the Los Angeles Unified School District board seat formerly held by Marguerite Poindexter LaMotte, who died in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Johanna Neuman
Robert S. Strauss, a one-time chairman of the Democratic National Committee and a Washington insider who combined earthy Texas charm with raw political power, died Wednesday. He was 95. A spokesman for Strauss' Washington law firm, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, confirmed his death but would release no other details. A U.S. trade representative in the Carter administration, Strauss was a poker-playing, cigar-chomping, power-lunch-eating rainmaker who was so successful at recruiting mega-clients that he stopped billing by the hour in the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | Jean Merl
At a recent reception in their honor, four of California's Democratic freshman House members posed for photos and beamed at well-wishers. But signs of the battles they face were hard to miss. Asked by a fellow politician how his reelection campaign was going, Rep. Scott Peters of San Diego replied, "Hanging in. Got a tough race. " The same answer could have come from any of the honorees. Although the rest of their first-term colleagues occupy seats in strongly Democratic districts, for these four, California's deep blue hue looks more like pale violet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1993
The letter (Nov. 11) by Patricia A. Gazin criticizing the Democratic Party for involvement in the Hermosa Beach municipal election ignored the fact that political parties, as well as other groups, have a right to offer and work for candidates in a nonpartisan race. Her vague and broad complaint was an insult not only to the Democratic Party but to the democratic process. Both the Democratic and Republican parties worked for a candidate in the Hermosa Beach campaign. This is not "meddling"; it's part of the American democratic tradition.
OPINION
March 13, 2006
So Rosa Brooks has joined the bandwagon in deciding the reason Americans got stuck with President Bush for a second term is because the dastardly Democratic Party and, specifically, Sen. John Kerry, didn't come up with a sufficiently catchy slogan (Opinion, March 10). There was absolutely nothing wrong with Kerry as a presidential candidate in terms of a message, diplomatic skills, fiscal responsibility, understanding issues or military credentials. The only reason we're stuck with Bush today is because there were just enough Americans who wanted to follow Bush down the path he has taken us. Much as we may now wish for world history to go easy on us by understanding how the "other guy" just didn't have the right slogan, history is not going to blame Kerry or the Democratic Party for what we have done to ourselves and the rest of the world.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The young are different from you and me - unless, of course, you happen to be one of them. If you're older than 34, I'm sorry to break it to you, but you're no longer the wave of the future. That distinction belongs to those born between 1980 and 2002, dubbed the "millennial generation" because they began to come of age at the turn of the century. They've grown up, most of them have found jobs (although that hasn't been easy) and they're a bigger, more powerful part of the electorate every year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Jean Merl
Politicking at the California Democratic Party Convention by candidates competing for official endorsements continued Saturday morning after delegate-hunting at a round of parties the night before. Volunteers started with pep talks and breakfast at "boiler rooms" set up at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles by Assembly Speaker John A. Perez and state Sen. Alex Padilla, who are running for state controller and secretary of state, respectively. With balloting for the party's endorsement scheduled for later in the day, time was running out as the two Los Angeles officeholders and their competitors rushed from one caucus to another, hoping to sway those who would be voting on whom the party should endorse.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|