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Democratic Party Iowa

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NEWS
February 9, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
Kansas Sen. Bob Dole and former television evangelist Pat Robertson both capitalized on the disenchantment of Iowa Republicans with the nation's direction to deliver a stunning blow to Vice President George Bush in Monday night's caucuses, the Los Angeles Times Poll found. In addition, Dole and the Democratic winner--Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt--both benefited from their emphasis on agriculture issues.
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NEWS
January 25, 2000 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The process of selecting the next leader of the free world began with 75-year-old Carita Kelleher getting a shampoo and blow-dry at West End Beauty Salon in the tiny town of Winterset. She was preparing for her television debut on "Good Morning America," which arrived at her 1,000-acre corn and soybean farm at 4:30 a.m. Monday to get a firsthand look at the way the Heartland nominates candidates for president--the Iowa caucus way.
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NEWS
February 8, 1988 | MAURA DOLAN and JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writers
Nearly three years after the start of one of the most intense Democratic presidential campaigns Iowans have ever seen, caucus-goers across this heartland state will declare their choice tonight from a crowded field, narrowly led in several pre-election polls by Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt. Under the glare of hundreds of television lights and world attention, Democrats will gather at 7 p.m.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | DAVE LESHER and RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
Campaigning all alone in the state where he has lived for 52 years, Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin scored a landslide victory Monday in the first electoral contest of the 1992 presidential race. As he promised, Harkin did better in Iowa's Democratic caucuses than any presidential candidate has ever done. He even exceeded former President Jimmy Carter's record of 59% in 1980. But the significance of his victory was limited because he faced almost no opposition. With 91.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | JAMES RISEN and JOHN BALZAR, Times Staff Writers
Just one month before the Feb. 8 Iowa caucuses--the first real electoral battle of the 1988 presidential contest--the political landscape in Iowa appears confused and uncertain, clouded by the sudden return of a once-fallen prodigal candidate on the Democratic side and shrouded in mystery by the unknown power of a former evangelical preacher and the lingering after-effects of the Iran-Contra scandal among the Republicans.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | From Reuters
Iowa Democrats decided Saturday against rules changes that would have given native son Sen. Tom Harkin stiffer competition from rival Democrats in the state's Feb. 10 presidential preference contest. Under the rules, Iowa Democrats must express their preferences in the open, a requirement that might intimidate supporters of other candidates because they would have to vote in the presence of party officials who often double as Harkin campaign workers.
NEWS
January 18, 1988 | JOHN BALZAR
Both Democrats and Republicans vote in Iowa's caucuses Feb. 8. But the process for each party is so utterly different, you would hardly know you are in the same state. For Democrats, the atmosphere will be open and boisterous--like a prize fight or the closing hour on the floor of the stock exchange. Here you vote with your feet, walking to a corner of the room and standing in public in groups backing the candidate of your choice.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Lee M. Walker was surrounded. "We just need one more, one," pleaded Mary Lee Rusk on behalf of Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis. It took 17 supporters at this township caucus to win one delegate to the county Democratic convention. The Dukakis forces numbered 16. Walker's wife, Randa, a supporter of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, put her hand on her husband's arm. "No, no, no," she implored frantically. "You don't even like Dukakis."
NEWS
October 30, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
If this is October, 1989, it must be time to start the 1992 presidential campaign. That's the way it seemed here in Iowa last weekend when Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, the 1988 Democratic vice presidential candidate, showed up to address a state party dinner and appear at two other local fund-raising functions.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | DAVE LESHER and RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
Campaigning all alone in the state where he has lived for 52 years, Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin scored a landslide victory Monday in the first electoral contest of the 1992 presidential race. As he promised, Harkin did better in Iowa's Democratic caucuses than any presidential candidate has ever done. He even exceeded former President Jimmy Carter's record of 59% in 1980. But the significance of his victory was limited because he faced almost no opposition. With 91.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | From Reuters
Iowa Democrats decided Saturday against rules changes that would have given native son Sen. Tom Harkin stiffer competition from rival Democrats in the state's Feb. 10 presidential preference contest. Under the rules, Iowa Democrats must express their preferences in the open, a requirement that might intimidate supporters of other candidates because they would have to vote in the presence of party officials who often double as Harkin campaign workers.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Black Hawk County Democrats gathered at the United Auto Workers' hall for their annual "all-Iowa" fund-raising dinner three weeks ago, everything seemed pretty much as usual. Green-and-white checkered tablecloths. A cash bar. Inch-thick Iowa pork chops. And of course, campaign posters. But one element was conspicuously missing. In a state that traditionally has been the starting-place for the nation's presidential campaigns, there was not even a hint of presidential politics.
NEWS
October 30, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
If this is October, 1989, it must be time to start the 1992 presidential campaign. That's the way it seemed here in Iowa last weekend when Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, the 1988 Democratic vice presidential candidate, showed up to address a state party dinner and appear at two other local fund-raising functions.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
Kansas Sen. Bob Dole and former television evangelist Pat Robertson both capitalized on the disenchantment of Iowa Republicans with the nation's direction to deliver a stunning blow to Vice President George Bush in Monday night's caucuses, the Los Angeles Times Poll found. In addition, Dole and the Democratic winner--Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt--both benefited from their emphasis on agriculture issues.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Lee M. Walker was surrounded. "We just need one more, one," pleaded Mary Lee Rusk on behalf of Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis. It took 17 supporters at this township caucus to win one delegate to the county Democratic convention. The Dukakis forces numbered 16. Walker's wife, Randa, a supporter of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, put her hand on her husband's arm. "No, no, no," she implored frantically. "You don't even like Dukakis."
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
On the strength of a savvy media blitz that stressed a populist Midwestern message on trade and agriculture, Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt surged to a narrow victory in Iowa after being all but written off just one month ago. Many political observers believe that his series of television commercials that humanized his tough stance on trade played a crucial role in Gephardt's turnaround.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Black Hawk County Democrats gathered at the United Auto Workers' hall for their annual "all-Iowa" fund-raising dinner three weeks ago, everything seemed pretty much as usual. Green-and-white checkered tablecloths. A cash bar. Inch-thick Iowa pork chops. And of course, campaign posters. But one element was conspicuously missing. In a state that traditionally has been the starting-place for the nation's presidential campaigns, there was not even a hint of presidential politics.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | James Risen
Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois became the chief beneficiary of the collapse of Delaware Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr.'s presidential campaign Wednesday, when almost all of Biden's former Iowa campaign staff--along with Biden's most influential supporter in the state--announced they were joining Simon's presidential campaign. Almost all of the remaining Democratic candidates had sought the group's support.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | MAURA DOLAN and JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writers
Nearly three years after the start of one of the most intense Democratic presidential campaigns Iowans have ever seen, caucus-goers across this heartland state will declare their choice tonight from a crowded field, narrowly led in several pre-election polls by Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt. Under the glare of hundreds of television lights and world attention, Democrats will gather at 7 p.m.
NEWS
January 18, 1988 | JOHN BALZAR
Both Democrats and Republicans vote in Iowa's caucuses Feb. 8. But the process for each party is so utterly different, you would hardly know you are in the same state. For Democrats, the atmosphere will be open and boisterous--like a prize fight or the closing hour on the floor of the stock exchange. Here you vote with your feet, walking to a corner of the room and standing in public in groups backing the candidate of your choice.
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