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June 19, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Virginia's two top Democrats, Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and Sen. Charles S. Robb, called an end Tuesday to a bizarre public argument involving allegations of wiretapping, womanizing and political skulduggery that may have hurt their once-favorable prospects for national office. Beaming as they stood side by side at an outdoor press conference on Capitol Hill, the two offered no apologies to each other and no clear explanation for their recent behavior.
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NEWS
May 5, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Even before the crowd started gathering for last month's shad planking--Virginia's most celebrated bipartisan political ritual--it was clear that this year's edition of the customarily convivial cookout was not going to be any love feast. Not with the 1994 contest for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Democrat Charles S. Robb threatening to rend both political parties asunder and send a warning to nervous Democratic and Republican leaders around the country.
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NEWS
October 22, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ronald Spiggle, Democratic county chairman in Appomattox County, Va., has not voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since 1980. But he plans to vote for the party's gubernatorial nominee, Douglas Wilder, on Nov. 7. What's more, Spiggle is confident that Wilder, a black, will carry Appomattox County, where the war between the states ended. The county went for George Bush by 2 to 1 last November. "Most people think he's a moderate who will keep the state programs going," Spiggle says.
NEWS
June 19, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Virginia's two top Democrats, Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and Sen. Charles S. Robb, called an end Tuesday to a bizarre public argument involving allegations of wiretapping, womanizing and political skulduggery that may have hurt their once-favorable prospects for national office. Beaming as they stood side by side at an outdoor press conference on Capitol Hill, the two offered no apologies to each other and no clear explanation for their recent behavior.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking out over a cheering crowd of black and white supporters, L. Douglas Wilder declared Tuesday night that he had become the nation's first elected black governor, even though nearly complete returns showed he held only a slender lead. He made no reference to the historic nature of his strong showing, saying only that the message sent was that "negative campaigns work everywhere but in Virginia."
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Even before the crowd started gathering for last month's shad planking--Virginia's most celebrated bipartisan political ritual--it was clear that this year's edition of the customarily convivial cookout was not going to be any love feast. Not with the 1994 contest for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Democrat Charles S. Robb threatening to rend both political parties asunder and send a warning to nervous Democratic and Republican leaders around the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1985
I do hope that Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) does not run for the presidency in 1988. I'm afraid he is becoming the Harold Stassen of the Democratic Party. VIRGINIA DARE LUDWIG Tustin
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking out over a cheering crowd of black and white supporters, L. Douglas Wilder declared Tuesday night that he had become the nation's first elected black governor, even though nearly complete returns showed he held only a slender lead. He made no reference to the historic nature of his strong showing, saying only that the message sent was that "negative campaigns work everywhere but in Virginia."
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ronald Spiggle, Democratic county chairman in Appomattox County, Va., has not voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since 1980. But he plans to vote for the party's gubernatorial nominee, Douglas Wilder, on Nov. 7. What's more, Spiggle is confident that Wilder, a black, will carry Appomattox County, where the war between the states ended. The county went for George Bush by 2 to 1 last November. "Most people think he's a moderate who will keep the state programs going," Spiggle says.
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