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Demonstrations Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
December 4, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring a warning from Washington, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic on Tuesday shut down the only radio stations in the capital that had provided reliable coverage of massive anti-government protests. The move came as five Supreme Court justices broke ranks with a Milosevic-controlled judiciary and lent support to the demonstrators, who are protesting the president's decision to annul opposition victories in Nov. 17 municipal elections.
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NEWS
July 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Angry over the arrest of a Serbian militant who allegedly attacked ethnic Albanians, thousands of Serbs blocked roads Tuesday into their part of this Kosovo city and staged mass rallies to demand the man's release. French soldiers backed by six armored personnel carriers blocked the main bridge over the Ibar River, which divides the Serbian and ethnic Albanian communities, refusing to allow even U.N. employees to cross.
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NEWS
March 3, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After firing on peaceful demonstrators in a Monday clash over Bosnia-Herzegovina's right to seek independence, militant Serbs later abandoned their barricades, which had held the city hostage throughout the day. About 5,000 youthful marchers plowed through the militants' heavily armed roadblocks around 9 p.m., after three fellow protesters had been felled by gunfire and one was reported to have died of those wounds. Four others were killed in earlier gun battles, hospital workers said.
NEWS
March 9, 2000 | Reuters
Thousands of Bosnian Croats protested Wednesday against the U.N. war crimes tribunal's decision to sentence former Bosnian Croat Gen. Tihomir Blaskic to 45 years in prison. Several thousand demonstrated in Blaskic's hometown, Kiseljak, northwest of the capital, Sarajevo. A TV cameraman said thousands more took to the streets in the ethnically divided southern city of Mostar. Schools and shops in Kiseljak were closed, and students carried Croatian flags and Blaskic posters.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Carrying banners and signs, thousands of Serbs marched Wednesday to protest the unification of Sarajevo, the most contentious issue in the Bosnian peace plan. The Bosnian government tried to reassure them that they will be safe, welcome and better off in a united city.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Angry over the arrest of a Serbian militant who allegedly attacked ethnic Albanians, thousands of Serbs blocked roads Tuesday into their part of this Kosovo city and staged mass rallies to demand the man's release. French soldiers backed by six armored personnel carriers blocked the main bridge over the Ibar River, which divides the Serbian and ethnic Albanian communities, refusing to allow even U.N. employees to cross.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Serbian protests mounting over the loss of the Bosnian capital city of Sarajevo, a senior Bosnian Serb leader warned Saturday that failure to resolve the issue could endanger American troops deployed to enforce peace in the Balkans. For the second consecutive day, angry Serbs marched against a new, U.S.-brokered peace agreement that puts Serb-held Sarajevo suburbs under Muslim-Croat government control.
NEWS
March 9, 2000 | Reuters
Thousands of Bosnian Croats protested Wednesday against the U.N. war crimes tribunal's decision to sentence former Bosnian Croat Gen. Tihomir Blaskic to 45 years in prison. Several thousand demonstrated in Blaskic's hometown, Kiseljak, northwest of the capital, Sarajevo. A TV cameraman said thousands more took to the streets in the ethnically divided southern city of Mostar. Schools and shops in Kiseljak were closed, and students carried Croatian flags and Blaskic posters.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.N. aid convoy that delivered its goods to 55,000 trapped Muslims was held hostage Thursday for the second time in two days--this time by the Muslims themselves instead of their Croatian enemies. In a two-day saga that left U.N. officials frustrated and clearly irritated at both sides, a convoy held up by demonstrating Croatian women and children for most of Wednesday finally reached starving Muslims in Mostar early Thursday.
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bureaucrats agreed on a pact and the military commanders endorsed it, but in the end it was a small army of singing children and an angry old woman who were nearly the undoing Wednesday of the United Nations' troubled mission here. Seeking for the second straight day to reach more than 35,000 stranded Muslims on the brink of starvation in nearby Mostar, a U.N.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this Bosnian Serb stronghold that was fed and armed by fellow Serbs in Yugoslavia during 3 1/2 years of war, the venting of fury over NATO's airstrikes against those ethnic brothers has softened during the past two weeks from hurling bricks to lighting candles. Emotions still run high enough to keep diplomats and businesspeople from NATO nations in exile and peacekeeping forces on high alert for provocations such as a shoulder-launched missile attack on a U.S. helicopter east of here Monday.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring a warning from Washington, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic on Tuesday shut down the only radio stations in the capital that had provided reliable coverage of massive anti-government protests. The move came as five Supreme Court justices broke ranks with a Milosevic-controlled judiciary and lent support to the demonstrators, who are protesting the president's decision to annul opposition victories in Nov. 17 municipal elections.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several hundred anguished Muslim women whose male relatives have been missing since July attacked the office of the International Committee of the Red Cross here Monday, heaving bricks and brandishing as weapons the sticks they had brought to hold banners. It was the first violent demonstration in Tuzla, headquarters for the U.S.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Carrying banners and signs, thousands of Serbs marched Wednesday to protest the unification of Sarajevo, the most contentious issue in the Bosnian peace plan. The Bosnian government tried to reassure them that they will be safe, welcome and better off in a united city.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Serbian protests mounting over the loss of the Bosnian capital city of Sarajevo, a senior Bosnian Serb leader warned Saturday that failure to resolve the issue could endanger American troops deployed to enforce peace in the Balkans. For the second consecutive day, angry Serbs marched against a new, U.S.-brokered peace agreement that puts Serb-held Sarajevo suburbs under Muslim-Croat government control.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.N. aid convoy that delivered its goods to 55,000 trapped Muslims was held hostage Thursday for the second time in two days--this time by the Muslims themselves instead of their Croatian enemies. In a two-day saga that left U.N. officials frustrated and clearly irritated at both sides, a convoy held up by demonstrating Croatian women and children for most of Wednesday finally reached starving Muslims in Mostar early Thursday.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this Bosnian Serb stronghold that was fed and armed by fellow Serbs in Yugoslavia during 3 1/2 years of war, the venting of fury over NATO's airstrikes against those ethnic brothers has softened during the past two weeks from hurling bricks to lighting candles. Emotions still run high enough to keep diplomats and businesspeople from NATO nations in exile and peacekeeping forces on high alert for provocations such as a shoulder-launched missile attack on a U.S. helicopter east of here Monday.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several hundred anguished Muslim women whose male relatives have been missing since July attacked the office of the International Committee of the Red Cross here Monday, heaving bricks and brandishing as weapons the sticks they had brought to hold banners. It was the first violent demonstration in Tuzla, headquarters for the U.S.
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bureaucrats agreed on a pact and the military commanders endorsed it, but in the end it was a small army of singing children and an angry old woman who were nearly the undoing Wednesday of the United Nations' troubled mission here. Seeking for the second straight day to reach more than 35,000 stranded Muslims on the brink of starvation in nearby Mostar, a U.N.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After firing on peaceful demonstrators in a Monday clash over Bosnia-Herzegovina's right to seek independence, militant Serbs later abandoned their barricades, which had held the city hostage throughout the day. About 5,000 youthful marchers plowed through the militants' heavily armed roadblocks around 9 p.m., after three fellow protesters had been felled by gunfire and one was reported to have died of those wounds. Four others were killed in earlier gun battles, hospital workers said.
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