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Demonstrations Thailand

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NEWS
May 8, 1992 | Associated Press
Tens of thousands of Thais defied the military's warnings against protests Thursday and demonstrated again outside Parliament to demand that Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon resign. It was the fourth straight day of mass protests against Suchinda, a former army chief who led a 1991 coup that ousted the elected government. Suchinda was named prime minister last month by a coalition of pro-military parties that emerged from the March election for Parliament.
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NEWS
May 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
About 2,000 demonstrators pushed over barriers and confronted riot police Saturday in a protest against the Asian Development Bank, which opened its annual meeting inside a heavily guarded university conference center. The protesters, chanting slogans such as "ADB, go to hell!" blocked traffic and burned an effigy of Prime Minister Chuan Leekpai when he refused to meet them. Hundreds of police bearing clubs and shields watched over the protesters from behind the barriers.
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NEWS
May 9, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The besieged new prime minister of Thailand vowed Friday night that he would not resign despite spreading political protests against his regime, the most serious demonstrations in the country in two decades. Hours after the prime minister, Suchinda Kraprayoon, appeared on national television and said he would not be forced out of office, the protests appeared to swell.
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | Associated Press
A government tribunal on Monday upheld an amnesty for military leaders and pro-democracy protesters involved in a violent demonstration in May. The new Parliament had rejected the decree last month. The ruling by the Constitution Tribunal is final and means that neither criminal nor civil charges can be lodged, said the tribunal's chairman, Marut Bunnag, who also is speaker of the House of Representatives.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Bush Administration on Wednesday pressed for an end to violence in Thailand, U.S. officials have found that in the post-Cold War environment, there is not much Washington can do alone to influence events in Bangkok. Japan is now by far Thailand's largest supplier of foreign aid and investment. In 1990, Tokyo supplied about $419 million in grants and loans to Thailand, about 74% of Thailand's entire worldwide foreign aid.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Groups of pro-democracy demonstrators pulled back from a confrontation with security forces late Tuesday, dispersing when troops fired in the air after two nights of running gun battles turned Bangkok's narrow streets into a war zone. In the third day of Bangkok violence, nations around the world sent warnings to Thailand's military government protesting the attacks on demonstrators. The United States assailed the Thai army's use of deadly force and suspended a joint U.S.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two adversaries in the government crisis now unfolding in Thailand are tough, unyielding figures who spent their formative years in the caldron of Thailand's military rather than in the compromise world of politics. But a mixture of differing backgrounds, age and even unorthodox religious beliefs helped place them on a collision course.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Fifteen students were arrested as a crowd of 1,000 people defied martial law Monday to take part in the first major protest against the coup that toppled Thailand's elected government. Meanwhile, the deputy leader of the military junta that ousted Prime Minister Chatichai Choonhavan on Saturday said an interim government would be formed "not later than next week" and would exclude the military and politicians.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | From Associated Press
The opposition today ended broad protests after the government agreed to a plan that could result in Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon's resignation in months, a politician said. The eight days of rallies by tens of thousands of people were Thailand's largest protests in two decades. Protesters who had been encamped on one of the city's main streets left the area early this morning.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political support for embattled Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon collapsed Friday, with a coalition of five governing parties saying it now is prepared to replace him after this week's violent anti-government protests. Today, The Nation newspaper reported that Suchinda met with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on Friday night and agreed to resign.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1992 | CLAYTON JONES, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
Just two years ago, the sheer speed of Thailand's economic growth made it appear destined to become Asia's next "little dragon," trailing South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore. But a hail of army bullets on the streets of Bangkok in May, triggered by anti-military protests, has dimmed hopes of the country becoming an economic dragon any time soon.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1992 | From Reuters
The captains of Thailand's tourism industry, its biggest foreign exchange earner, say last month's political violence could cost the industry hundreds of millions of dollars in lost revenue. "The cumulative effect of these events is a serious lack of confidence which must be of concern to anybody who is involved in the travel and tourism industry," said Chatrachai Bunya-Ananta, executive vice president of Thai International Airways.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jubilant Thais celebrated the resignation of the nation's prime minister Sunday, but many demanded the cancellation of a royal amnesty that protects him and military leaders from prosecution for the deaths of unarmed demonstrators. Suchinda Kraprayoon, the former armed forces commander, went on national television at noon Sunday and said he is resigning to "show my political responsibility" for last week's violence during pro-democracy demonstrations.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1992 | ELIZABETH LU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the resignation of Thailand's controversial prime minister Sunday, the stock market is expected to recover today from a slide begun with last week's political violence, according to brokers here. "I think the market should go up tomorrow," Kongkiat Opaswongkarn, managing director of Baring Research Ltd., said Sunday night.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled Thai Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon, who angered the nation when troops brutally shot down unarmed demonstrators last week, resigned in disgrace today. Appearing on national television, the gaunt-looking former general expressed remorse for the killings and said he hoped the nation would begin to heal itself after his departure.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political support for embattled Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon collapsed Friday, with a coalition of five governing parties saying it now is prepared to replace him after this week's violent anti-government protests. Today, The Nation newspaper reported that Suchinda met with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on Friday night and agreed to resign.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Army troops quelled anti-government rioting early today with an infantry assault on a besieged downtown hotel. The attack came after street fighting had raged most of Monday and after the arrest of Thailand's pro-democracy leader. At least 19 persons were believed killed in the second day of violence, with scores wounded and hundreds of demonstrators arrested. Some Thai newspapers reported that up to 100 persons may have been killed in the final attack.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jubilant Thais celebrated the resignation of the nation's prime minister Sunday, but many demanded the cancellation of a royal amnesty that protects him and military leaders from prosecution for the deaths of unarmed demonstrators. Suchinda Kraprayoon, the former armed forces commander, went on national television at noon Sunday and said he is resigning to "show my political responsibility" for last week's violence during pro-democracy demonstrations.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seated on a sidewalk next to an electric fan, Chalad Vorachat seems an unlikely choice for the martyr of Thai politics. A 49-year-old proprietor of provincial cable television networks, Chalad has been on a hunger strike since Suchinda Kraprayoon was appointed prime minister last month. Chalad vividly recalls his last meal, at 2 a.m. on April 8. "Fighting for democracy is more important than a life," he says matter-of-factly.
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Big Su is a murderer," said a pamphlet handed out in central Bangkok, using the newspaper nickname of Thai Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon. A blood-soaked shrub wore a yellow sign that read: "The Tree of Democracy." Joss sticks burned in memory of the dead, and passers-by hung garlands of purple orchids on the shrub's broken branches. Mourners tied a black sash around the wide girth of the capital's Democracy Monument.
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