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Demonstrations Ussr

NEWS
August 24, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under siege by almost a thousand Muscovites demanding that its apparatchiks be brought to justice for their role in the failed coup, the headquarters of the Communist Party was closed down Friday and its 2,000 rooms sealed off so that no more evidence could be destroyed or carried away.
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NEWS
August 24, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party, accused of complicity in the conservative coup d'etat this week, came under strong attack across the nation Friday, and its 73-year hold on power appeared to be slipping fast. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered the suspension of all the party's activities in the Russian Federation, the country's largest republic, and halted the publication of its newspapers, including the party daily Pravda, on grounds that they had backed the putsch.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elated by their victory over the reactionary junta, Muscovites destroyed one of the most powerful symbols of their past oppression on Thursday by dismantling a statue of the father of the Soviet secret police, Felix E. Dzerzhinsky. The crowd cheered wildly and chanted "Down with the KGB!" as yellow, German-made construction cranes lifted the 12-ton bronze monument from its pedestal in the center of a traffic circle just before midnight. "This is fruit of our victory!"
NEWS
August 21, 1991
Estonia. A column of more than 100 light armored vehicles and trucks was reported to be on the move toward the Estonian capital, Tallinn. Latvia. Soviet soldiers seized control of Latvian broadcast studios and the central telephone exchange. One report said two people were wounded. Lithuania. President Vytautas Landsbergis called for acts of non-violent civil disobedience. Moldavia.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voices from the opposition: Russians opposed to the coup speak out. "When (former Soviet leader Nikita S.) Khrushchev was deposed, we heard about it on the radio in the morning and went to work as if nothing happened. What the people leading this coup did not take into consideration was that the Russian people have changed. That's why there are so many of us, of all ages, here. After fighting for free elections and choosing our own government--we will defend it with all our strength."
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by fearsome military might, the chiefs of the Soviet army, KGB and police and fellow right-wingers on Monday sequestered Mikhail S. Gorbachev, clamped a state of emergency on Moscow and swiftly moved to freeze or gut many of the deposed Soviet president's reforms. But less than 24 hours after the Kremlin hard-liners made a move that shocked the world, some army units were defying them by racing to the aid of Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidential summit is all well and good, said Brian Behan, a tanned resident of Los Angeles with a large cross dangling from his ear and a supply of Russian-language Safe Sex brochures in tow. "But what we are doing is the first of its kind," he said. "Summits are important, but this is historic." As the U.S.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While President Bush was being greeted Tuesday inside the Kremlin, as many as 3,000 Meskhetian Turks were pumping their fists in the air and demanding that they be allowed to return to their historic homeland in the Caucasus. The demonstration, just outside the Kremlin walls, was one of many signs that the Moscow he is visiting is a very different place from the Soviet capital that other U.S. presidents have seen.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rare flare-up of violence inspired by Islamic militancy, hundreds of Soviet Muslims stormed government headquarters in Dagestan as they clamored for the right of all Muslims to undertake the annual pilgrimage to Mecca and receive government subsidies to help pay their way.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's chief prosecutor denied Monday that paratroopers killed any demonstrators when they stormed the Lithuanian television center in Vilnius in January, and he contended that most died as a result of Lithuanian nationalists firing into the crowd.
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