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Deng Xiaoping

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NEWS
June 3, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The large wallposters, the marches and chants, the fists in the air are all familiar to Guo, a frustrated engineer turned second-hand clothes salesman and a veteran of a failed attempt to alter China's political system. Guo, 42, views the current democracy effort in Beijing as unfinished business--and perhaps a kind of vindication for activists like himself who once tried to push political reform early in post-Mao China. Guo participated in the 1979 Democracy Wall campaign, which, like the current Beijing spring, seemed poised to upset China's seemingly unshakable Communist Party Establishment.
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OPINION
February 15, 2012 | By Nina Hachigian
The palace intrigue surrounding the shape of China'snext leadership is thick. Rumors abound about who's up, who's down and who's out. What is fairly certain is that Vice President Xi Jinping, who arrives Thursday in Los Angeles for a visit, will become general secretary of the Communist Party in November and China's next president in March 2013. What we do not yet know is who will fill the remaining open slots on the powerful Politburo Standing Committee, as seven of the nine members retire.
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NEWS
May 26, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
At one platform of the vast, cavernous and filthy Beijing Railway Station, fresh recruits arrived from the countryside, stowaways who had come to the capital Thursday night to join fellow students in Tian An Men Square in a protracted war of nerves with authorities. Their faces lighted up as the train pulled into the station to the cheers of sympathizers. At the next platform, more than 1,000 similarly youthful soldiers of the People's Liberation Army languished on the hard seats of a parked and darkened train in which they had been cooped up for more than four days.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2004 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
"To get rich is glorious." With that catchy slogan, Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping is credited with unleashing a revolution that transformed a nation of Mao jackets and people's communes into a land of Starbucks-drinking, Gucci-loving techies.
BOOKS
June 11, 1989 | Jack Miles
. . . is the subject of a biography by former Beijing correspondent Uli Franz, published in 1988 and just re-released by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich ($21.95). Times reviewer Orville Schell noted the difficulty of biography in a country of closed archives. The documentary shortcomings of Franz's work are thus real, he concluded, and yet: "(The biography) is not likely to be improved upon soon, unless Deng himself suddenly steps out of that long tradition of secretive leaders and unburdens himself to the world for posterity or until that unforeseeable time in the future when the archives in Beijing are finally opened."
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | Associated Press
Senior leader Deng Xiaoping made his first public appearance since July, voting Wednesday in citywide elections in the capital. The 86-year-old leader, believed to be suffering from cancer, appeared frail. Deng was shown on state television moving steadily but a bit shakily to the voter registration table. His daughter held his arm as he walked to the ballot box and dropped in his ballot.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Deng Xiaoping, China's paramount leader, made a rare public appearance this week in the coastal city of Shenzhen, China's economic success story. He cruised an amusement park in a golf cart and caught the view from a revolving restaurant atop a skyscraper. It was the first public appearance since last February for Deng, 87, and touched off speculation on its purpose. "The trip means he's OK, he can travel. He's trying to reassure people," said one Beijing-based Western diplomat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1997
Mao Tse-tung led a revolution that brought epochal social and economic change to China at a terrible human cost. The death toll from state-induced famine and state-sanctioned brutality numbered in the tens of millions. Deng Xiaoping led a revolution no less history-changing for China, but one whose consequences seem sure to be far more lasting and certainly vastly more beneficial to the Chinese masses.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
General Secretary Zhao Ziyang, in a speech reported Sunday by the official New China News Agency, has set the stage for a key meeting of China's legislature with a call for acceleration of China's market-oriented reforms. In the speech, delivered last week to a five-day meeting of the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee, Zhao also revealed that Deng Xiaoping, China's paramount leader, has strongly endorsed a plan for rapid, export-oriented development of China's coastal regions.
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | United Press International
Senior Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, describing himself as a "setting sun" a decade after he gained supreme power in China, said Tuesday that he has largely completed the job of lining up his successors. Deng's rare reference to his personal goals constituted an acknowledgement that one of his chief aims has been to assure a smooth transfer of power after his death and to avoid the chaotic struggles of the Mao Tse-tung era.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | JIM MANN
It almost sounds like a Jay Leno routine. Imagine if the Pentagon started manufacturing refrigerators, running breweries, building hotels and smuggling cars as a way of making money for its budget. In China, this is not a joke. It has been the reality for most of the last two decades. The Chinese People's Liberation Army, the world's biggest military force, in the 1980s began operating an array of civilian business enterprises big and small.
OPINION
June 21, 1998 | Nancy Yoshihara, Nancy Yoshihara is an editorial writer for The Times
On Nov. 16, 1997, Wei Jingsheng was banished from China. Since his arrival in the United States the next day, China's best-known democracy leader and human-rights activist has worked tirelessly and traveled extensively to advance the cause of democracy in China. Most of his adult life--18 years--has been spent in prison. Wei, 48, was an electrician at the Beijing Zoo when he first raised the idea of democracy during the 1978-79 Democracy Wall Movement in Beijing.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overhauling the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party and ousting a key rival, President Jiang Zemin firmly established himself Thursday as China's undisputed top leader and built a loyal political base for his critical program to restructure struggling state industries. "I hereby declare that the 15th congress concludes victoriously," a beaming Jiang, 71, announced in the Great Hall of the People, site of the national party convention that is held once every five years.
NEWS
August 10, 1997
'Thus begins a new era in the history of China. We, the 475 million people of China, have now stood up. The future of our nation is infinitely bright.' Revolutionary leader Mao led China as chairman of the Communist Party until his death in 1976. Above, he proclaims the establishment of the People's Republic of China. CHINA UNDER COMMUNISM Some key dates: Oct. 1, 1949: The People's Republic of China is founded.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Restaurateur Tony Chan can tell the mainland Chinese by what they order: pricey Shanghai hairy crabs and the best Chinese wine. So when they leave his Golden Snow restaurant, he doesn't ask for money. "They just give us their business card, and we bill them at the end of the month," he explained. Another way to pick them out, a taxi driver explained, is "they're the ones carrying the suitcases filled with cash."
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One still sells her mediocre paintings for a living. Another continues his advocacy on behalf of the disabled. Yet a third holds on to her high-level bureaucratic post. Despite the history of this nation, which is littered with the bodies of the heirs of fallen emperors and senior statesmen, life has apparently carried on as usual for the five children of Deng Xiaoping, China's late "paramount leader." Since his death Feb.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1992 | From Reuters
Deng Xiaoping, hailed at China's Communist Party Congress last week as the grand architect of economic reform, learned his petit bourgeois ethics as the operator of a small restaurant in Paris, an official newspaper reported Friday. Shanghai's Xinmin Evening News said Deng opened the China Beancurd Shop in June, 1922, to finance his studies in France. Zhou Enlai, who eventually became Communist China's prime minister, gave him the idea, it said.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even after former Shanghai Mayor Jiang Zemin was given the top position in the Chinese Communist Party in 1989, few people took him seriously as the man who would eventually replace Deng Xiaoping as the real power in China. Since then, Jiang has added two more important posts: president of China and chairman of the influential Military Affairs Commission. In addition, he has stacked the Central Committee of the Communist Party with friends and cronies from his days in Shanghai.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1997
On Feb. 25, I attended a board of trustees meeting at the North Orange County Community College District with the sole purpose of supporting the faculty's stalled salary negotiations. What I saw filled me with shock and disgust: the district's formal condolences on the death of Deng Xiaoping. The rationale for this horrific commiseration was an extension of a Fullerton College sister-city program that involved mundane student and teacher exchanges between Fullerton College and some obscure college in China.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Weeping uncontrollably, the widow of Deng Xiaoping scattered the ashes of China's late "paramount leader" from a plane above China's seas in a final farewell to the man who molded modern China. "Daddy, you have returned to the sea and to nature," Deng Rong, one of his three daughters, sobbed as the family scattered the ashes mingled with fresh flower petals from a chute in a Russian-made military transport aircraft. "May you rest in peace," she said in the ceremony, later televised.
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