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Dengue Fever

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NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Federal officials said Tuesday that they fear an outbreak of dengue fever in Florida after a survey of Key West residents found that at least 5% had been infected or exposed to the virus. With the exception of a handful of isolated cases along the Texas-Mexico border, there had previously been no cases in the United States since 1946 and no outbreak in Florida since 1934. Dengue fever, which is characterized by a fever of 104 to 105 degrees, a widespread rash, headache, fatigue and muscle aches, is the most common disease caused by mosquito-transmitted viruses in the world.
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WORLD
December 19, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A mosquito-borne virus usually restricted to Africa and Asia has been detected for the first time in the Western Hemisphere, with 10 confirmed cases on the French side of the Caribbean island of St. Martin, U.S. authorities have warned. With the winter travel season in full swing through the holidays, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a travel advisory for those headed to the tourist playgrounds. The chikungunya virus in spread by the bite of infected mosquitoes and can cause " debilitating illness , most often characterized by fever, headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, muscle pain, rash and joint pain," the CDC said on its website.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
Bassekou Kouyate and Ngoni Ba, with Dengue Fever When: 8 p.m. Friday Where: Grand Performances stage, 300-350 S. Grand Ave. Price: Free Info: (213) 687-2159, http://www.grandperformances.org
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
FRESNO - A mosquito that can carry dengue and yellow fever has been found in California, prompting intense eradication efforts in the Central Valley and warnings from officials about how to keep the pest from spreading. "It could change the way we live in California, if we don't stop it," said Tim Phillips of the Fresno Mosquito and Vector Control District. "Imagine not feeling safe to sit out in your backyard in the afternoons. " The yellow fever mosquito, or Aedes aegypti - a white polka-dotted bug that bites during the day and can lay its eggs in less than a teaspoon of water - was first detected in June in Madera.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The dengue fever virus, which infects 50 million to 100 million people around the world every year, might possibly yield to a little bacterium called Wolbachia, if research just published in Nature pans out. And that could be big: Researchers have been trying for years to find ways to control the mosquitoes that spread dengue fever and malaria. They've not had much luck so far. Instead of attempting to kill the dengue virus' carrier -- the mosquito Aedes aegypti -- the trick in these experiments was to infect the mosquitoes with a strain of Wolbachia . The Wolbachia doesn't kill mosquitoes, but it gets in the way of replication of the dengue virus inside the insects.
TRAVEL
October 8, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
With a dengue fever epidemic spreading through Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean, travelers to these destinations are being urged to take precautions. Since the beginning of this year, more than 35,000 cases of dengue fever and 545 cases of its more severe form--hemorrhagic dengue--have been reported in Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean.
TRAVEL
January 23, 2005 | Kathleen Doheny, Healthy Traveler
Avian flu and SARS made headlines last year, but malaria and dengue fever should be on travelers' radar for 2005, experts say. That doesn't mean tourists should let down their guard against bird flu or severe acute respiratory syndrome, both of which may reemerge, travel medicine experts say. But several cite malaria and dengue fever as more likely threats. Top health concerns in 2005: Malaria: Until they travel overseas, most Americans don't think much about the mosquito-borne illness, says Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky, senior travelers' health consultant for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a professor of medicine at Emory University in Atlanta.
TRAVEL
January 22, 2006 | Kathleen Doheny, Healthy Traveler
AVIAN flu is a worry, of course, if you are headed to Asia. But getting dengue fever is actually a bigger risk on the continent. In the Caribbean, you're more likely to pick up skin parasites. In sub-Saharan Africa, be wary of ticks, which spread spotted fever. The health hazards of international travel are changing, according to the results of a study published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine. "It used to be that malaria was the most common cause of fever in travelers to the tropical countries," says Dr. David O. Freedman, director of the Travelers Health Clinic at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the lead author of the study.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
Federal health officials confirmed that four people on Maui contracted dengue fever over the summer, the first cases of the mosquito-borne disease in Hawaii in more than 50 years, state officials said. Dengue fever is rarely fatal, and the four people confirmed to have had it have recovered. Still, state health officials are urging people in eastern Maui, a sparsely populated area that is largely rain forest, to take precautions and eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.
TRAVEL
September 14, 1997 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
For international travelers, the risk of dengue fever--a viral disease spread by the bite of an infected mosquito--is usually low. But every year, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cases of dengue, which usually is mild but can be fatal, are confirmed in travelers returning to the United States from visits to endemic areas.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Monte Morin
A study published Wednesday on a dengue fever outbreak in Key West, Fla., has local health officials buzzing. The paper, which was published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and appeared in their journal,  Emerging Infectious Diseases , confirmed that the mosquito-borne illness had indeed returned to the U.S. mainland after an absence of decades. However, Monroe County Health Department Administrator Bob Eadie said the report may leave people with the mistaken impression that the dengue risk remains.
WORLD
November 1, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
JUAZEIRO, Brazil - Under normal circumstances, Cicera Maria da Silva would be less than excited about a researcher intentionally releasing thousands of mosquitoes just outside her husband's corner grocery store. Mosquitoes here are not just a ubiquitous annoyance; they spread deadly diseases, including dengue fever, which struck Da Silva's mother a year ago. But that's why she's OK with the truck that passes through this poor corner of Brazil a few times a week and pours so many of the winged creatures into the hot streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012
MUSIC The folks behind the Desert Daze festival have assembled a pretty worthy anti-Coachella in its own right. Over 11 days, local luminaries including Allah Las, Bleached and Dengue Fever join noted nationals Akron/Family, the Fresh & Onlys and dozens more in what looks to be the preeminent diversion from that other rock festival down the road. Dillon's Roadhouse, 64647 Dillon Road, Desert Hot Springs. 4 p.m. Thu.-April 22. Free. moonblockparty.org.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
It started when an El Monte woman called to report an unusual pest: tiny mosquitoes that she said were biting her in the middle of the day. The complaint last week raised red flags for technicians at the San Gabriel Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District, who know that common mosquitoes typically attack during morning and evening hours. When a worker arrived at Dodson Street, one of the insects landed on his partner, so he trapped it in a plastic jar. "He took a close look at it, and he realized we might have a problem," said Kelly Middleton, a district spokeswoman.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The dengue fever virus, which infects 50 million to 100 million people around the world every year, might possibly yield to a little bacterium called Wolbachia, if research just published in Nature pans out. And that could be big: Researchers have been trying for years to find ways to control the mosquitoes that spread dengue fever and malaria. They've not had much luck so far. Instead of attempting to kill the dengue virus' carrier -- the mosquito Aedes aegypti -- the trick in these experiments was to infect the mosquitoes with a strain of Wolbachia . The Wolbachia doesn't kill mosquitoes, but it gets in the way of replication of the dengue virus inside the insects.
SPORTS
June 9, 2011 | From Times wire reports
Surfing champion Andy Irons, who died at the age of 32 in a Dallas hotel room in November, had a heart attack caused by the hardening of his coronary arteries, his family said in a press release. Drugs contributed to the death, a Texas medical examiner determined. Irons had withdrawn from an event in 2010 amid concerns that he and others on the tour contracted dengue fever. He was returning home to Hawaii when he was found dead in an airport hotel while on a layover in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2011
A list of upcoming concerts across the Southland, with on-sale dates in parentheses. Verizon Wireless Amphitheater System of a Down, May 25 (Sat.) Gibson Amphitheatre Def Leppard, Sept. 7 (Fri.); Hot 92 Freestyle Explosion with Expose and more, June 11 (Sat.) Hollywood Palladium Above & Beyond, May 14 (Mon.) Greek Theatre Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin Experience, May 27; War, May 28; Jethro Tull, June 11; Youssou N'Dour/Angélique Kidjo/Vusi Mahlasela, June 16 (Fri.)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010
POP MUSIC Dengue Fever The psychedelic rockers with Cambodian flair will provide a live score to the 1925 stop-motion science fiction classic "The Lost World," based on Arthur Conan Doyle's enduring novel. The six-piece's infectious grooves will set a whimsical tone for the onscreen action, which features showdowns between a menagerie of dinosaurs and mythical beasts. Royce Hall, 405 Hilgard Ave., UCLA. 8 p.m. $33, $43, $58. (310) 825-2101. Mayer Hawthorne The Ann Arbor, Mich.
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