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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999
As recently as last week, there was clear evidence that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and its board still didn't get it. There was the agency at a meeting Sunday trying to defend to riders a decision to cancel or shorten 18 bus lines when the Hollywood leg of the Red Line subway opens later this year. This was simple logic by MTA standards. Riders won't need buses once the subway opens, the board insisted, so shut down the lines.
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HEALTH
August 4, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Sure, smoking is bad for you -- but what happens when you combine it with something really good -- like running eight miles a day? Do you get a healthier smoker? Or an unhealthy athlete? It's one of those is-the-cigarette-half-smoked-or-half-unsmoked conundrums. And there's no definitive answer. "If people can quit, that's the best thing," says Dr. Robert Sallis, director of sports medicine at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Fontana.
OPINION
October 24, 2009
One purpose of the healthcare reform effort in Washington is to help more Americans obtain coverage, in part by making policies available to people with preexisting health problems. But the pending bills wouldn't end the nightmares faced by others whose insurance fails them when they need it most. The problem starts with the 35-year-old Employee Retirement Income Security Act, a federal law that regulates the pensions, retirement savings programs and other benefits provided by private employers, guilds or unions.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
After an outpatient procedure last summer, Sidney Fallender was expecting to go straight home. But when two nurses tried to get the 93-year-old Sherman Oaks resident on his feet, they discovered he was unable to walk on his own. "The doctor told her assistant to call the paramedics," Fallender recalled. He was taken to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center by ambulance, less than a mile from his doctor's office, for possible emergency surgery. "A couple of weeks later I got a bill for the ambulance service in the amount of almost $1,000," he says.
OPINION
March 10, 2012
In a March 5 editorial , The Times opposed a bill in the French parliament that would have made it a crime to deny the Armenian genocide. The bill was proposed by President Nicolas Sarkozy, then struck down byFrance's Constitutional Council. Now Sarkozy says he wants to revive it. Reader Berj Proodian wrote suggesting that The Times may have been hypocritical on the subject: "In the past year, the L.A. Times has printed [several] editorials condemning France's law against denying the Armenian genocide.
OPINION
November 2, 2011 | Meghan Daum
I didn't see any Ruth Madoff masks on Halloween night, but it wouldn't have surprised me if I had. The wife of disgraced Wall Street Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff is Pariah No. 1 this week, followed closely by her son, Andrew. The two, along with Andrew's fiance, appeared on "60 Minutes" on Sunday night to promote their "authorized family biography," "Truth and Consequences. " "I have been eager, I would say almost desperate, to speak out publicly and tell people that I'm absolutely not involved," Andrew told Morley Safer.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
The City Council on Wednesday approved plans for a 10,000-square-foot house in the Emerald Hills tract, reversing a denial last month by the Planning Commission. Commission members had said the proposed two-story Colonial-style house in the 19900 block of Tennessee Trail would be overwhelming and incompatible with other homes in the neighborhood.
NEWS
May 16, 1993
A firm contracted by Los Angeles County to electronically monitor people under house arrest filed suit last week, challenging the Monrovia City Council's denial of a conditional permit to allow felons to visit the firm's office. Linda Connelly & Associates, a San Francisco-based company, asserts in its Los Angeles Superior Court complaint that council members did not base their denial on factual assertions.
HOME & GARDEN
September 5, 2009 | Emily Green
Coffee table books on gardening are generally useless, but here's a beauty queen with brains. "The Dry Gardening Handbook: Plants and Practices for a Changing Climate" by a Frenchman, Olivier Filippi, betrays an understandable fondness for the dry plants of his native garrigue , the French version of our chaparral. Yet as he pushes out beyond the south of France to places with similar climate zones, Filippi argues that drought is not a limitation but the source of untold diversity from regions in the Mediterranean, South Africa, South America, Australia and California.
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