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Denise Rich

NEWS
February 17, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional investigators are hoping to learn more from former President Clinton's top aides about what led to his last-minute pardons, but prospects of obtaining their testimony are far from certain. The House Government Reform Committee has asked Clinton to waive any executive privilege claims that could keep aides such as former White House lawyers Bruce Lindsey and Beth Nolan from disclosing what they know, but the panel has received no response.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001
Former President Bill Clinton insists he pardoned fugitive financier Marc Rich because it "was the right thing to do." He hasn't offered to explain what made it right, leaving that chore to Jack Quinn, one of Rich's lawyers and Clinton's former White House counsel, who got his old boss to issue the pardon in his final hours in office. Quinn says Clinton "grasped the essence of my argument" that the case "should have been handled civilly, not criminally."
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. attorney in New York has opened a criminal investigation to determine if President Clinton's last-minute pardon of fugitive commodities broker Marc Rich was secured with illegal payments, sources in the federal government said Wednesday. The decision by Mary Jo White, a Democratic appointee, to investigate the Rich pardon came just a day after President Bush criticized congressional reviews of the matter, saying it was "time to move on."
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Clinton's last-day pardons are final and irrevocable, but congressional Republicans are exploring legal options that could lead to sanctions against Clinton or the prosecution of anyone who sought to buy such favors.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Clinton administration official acknowledged Thursday that his partial endorsement of the pardon of fugitive oil broker Marc Rich probably was a mistake as outrage in Congress deepened over former President Clinton's controversial last-minute action. Former Deputy Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr.
NEWS
January 24, 2001 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has become the most controversial--and mysterious--of President Clinton's last-minute pardons: Marc Rich, a fugitive commodities trader indicted in 1983 on charges of massive tax fraud and illegal oil trading with Iran, is now free from prosecution after 17 years on the lam. But why would a billionaire who thumbed his nose at the U.S. justice system, a businessman facing more than 300 years in prison, receive such largess?
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