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Dennis Lehane

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher
Back in 1941, a Russian immigrant named Albert Lewis Kanter had (literally) a novel idea for the fledgling medium of the American comic book -- he launched Classics Illustrated, a series that lived up to its name by converting "Ivanhoe," "Jane Eyre," "The Iliad" and scores of other bookshelf familiars into funny-book fodder. It was a high-minded mission, really, but it had its share of creaky moments; let's face it, a 52-page comic book isn't the most obvious format for "Lord Jim."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
There's no tribute more fitting - or eerie - than a well-known actor who dies, then materializes months or years later on the movie screen. It happened to James Dean in “Rebel Without a Cause.” Ditto for Heath Ledger in “The Dark Knight.” Now James Gandolfini will join their tragic ranks. Gandolfini, who died Wednesday at age 51, shot two movies since last summer that he won't get to see. The rest of us, fortunately, will. PHOTOS: James Gandolfini | 1961-2013 In Nicole Holofcener's  “Enough Said,” shot in August and September in Los Angeles, Gandolfini plays a character we haven't seen him play before: a gentle, lovable soul who is just looking for love.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For the last decade, Dennis Lehane has been resolute in interviews and appearances that Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro, the popular private-eye team who starred in his first five books, weren't returning any time soon. But like any smart author worth his or her salt, especially someone with the bestsellers "Mystic River" and "Shutter Island" under his belt, he left the door open for them to return if they so chose. Now, to the delight of his longest-serving fans, Patrick and Angie have returned in "Moonlight Mile," a sequel to Lehane's 1998 bestseller (and basis for the 2007 film)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Just when you thought literary awards season was over, there were not one but two occasions to get dressed up and applaud great writers and their publications Thursday. They both took place in New York -- meaning we didn't have to hit the dry cleaner -- but they nevertheless deserve notice. Dennis Lehane's "Live By Night" took the top honor -- best novel -- at the Edgar Awards, presented by the Mystery Writers of America. Lehane is a versatile writer who can set mysteries in the past -- "Live By Night" is about a Prohibition-era rum-runner -- and the present, as well as write for the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Dennis Lehane's dog has gone missing, and he's taken to Facebook in an effort to find her. In return for bringing Tessa back to Lehane and his family, he's offering a reward: He'll name a character in his next book for the person who finds the dog. Tessa is a beagle that went missing Christmas Eve. On Christmas Day, Lehane posted this on his Facebook page : "[O]ur recent and beloved rescue dog, Tessa, jumped the fence in Brookline and has been roaming through the wilds of Coolidge Corner for the last 24 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Times
Forty years ago, in 1970, the young George V. Higgins was working as a federal prosecutor in Boston. By then he'd graduated from Boston College, done a creative writing course at Stanford and worked as a newspaperman before going back to school to study law. He'd written a string of unpublished books and his latest, "The Friends of Eddie Coyle" (Picador: 182 pp., $14 paper), had already been rejected many times. But Alfred A. Knopf decided to take a chance, offering Higgins the not-so-princely sum of $2,000 for the novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2012 | By Dick Lochte
LIVE BY NIGHT A Novel by Dennis Lehane William Morrow: 416 p.p., $27.99 In a recent interview, Dennis Lehane told fellow author Stephen Anable, "one of the reasons I write is because of all the Jimmy Cagney movies I watched when I was young. The gangster novel is my favorite sub-genre. " Although his fame comes from a different sub-genre - a series of critically acclaimed private-eye novels - and the not-quite-ganglandish "Mystic River" and "Shutter Island," Lehane's new book is unquestionably a gangster novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010
Shutter Island Based on the Novel by Dennis Lehane Graphic Novel Adaptation by Christian de Metter Tokyopop: 128 pp., $21.99 paper
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Penguin will expand its small library e-book lending program to two major regions, Cleveland and Los Angeles County. About a year ago, Penguin pulled its e-books from libraries. The change is about back-end distribution systems: Instead of using the market-dominant OverDrive, Penguin is expanding a pilot program with 3M using distributor Baker & Taylor. This is super-interesting to people who know a lot about libraries and e-books, less so to end users. The upshot: Los Angeles County library readers should be able to borrow the e-book of Junot Diaz's "This Is How You Lose Her" before the end of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Just when you thought literary awards season was over, there were not one but two occasions to get dressed up and applaud great writers and their publications Thursday. They both took place in New York -- meaning we didn't have to hit the dry cleaner -- but they nevertheless deserve notice. Dennis Lehane's "Live By Night" took the top honor -- best novel -- at the Edgar Awards, presented by the Mystery Writers of America. Lehane is a versatile writer who can set mysteries in the past -- "Live By Night" is about a Prohibition-era rum-runner -- and the present, as well as write for the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Is there an actor who's been taking on more colorful roles lately than James Gandolfini? In the last few months he's been a blitzed-out hit man (“Killing Them Softly”), self-promoting casino magnate (this weekend's “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone”), hectoring immigrant dad (“Not Fade Away”). And, oh yeah, Leon Panetta (“Zero Dark Thirty”). Gandolfini is adding another notch to that list. According to a person familiar with the production who was not authorized to talk about it publicly, he'll play opposite Tom Hardy - will play Hardy's cousin, actually - in “Animal Rescue,” the new movie written by Dennis Lehane that Fox Searchlight is just beginning to shoot.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Dennis Lehane's dog has gone missing, and he's taken to Facebook in an effort to find her. In return for bringing Tessa back to Lehane and his family, he's offering a reward: He'll name a character in his next book for the person who finds the dog. Tessa is a beagle that went missing Christmas Eve. On Christmas Day, Lehane posted this on his Facebook page : "[O]ur recent and beloved rescue dog, Tessa, jumped the fence in Brookline and has been roaming through the wilds of Coolidge Corner for the last 24 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Penguin will expand its small library e-book lending program to two major regions, Cleveland and Los Angeles County. About a year ago, Penguin pulled its e-books from libraries. The change is about back-end distribution systems: Instead of using the market-dominant OverDrive, Penguin is expanding a pilot program with 3M using distributor Baker & Taylor. This is super-interesting to people who know a lot about libraries and e-books, less so to end users. The upshot: Los Angeles County library readers should be able to borrow the e-book of Junot Diaz's "This Is How You Lose Her" before the end of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2012 | By Dick Lochte
LIVE BY NIGHT A Novel by Dennis Lehane William Morrow: 416 p.p., $27.99 In a recent interview, Dennis Lehane told fellow author Stephen Anable, "one of the reasons I write is because of all the Jimmy Cagney movies I watched when I was young. The gangster novel is my favorite sub-genre. " Although his fame comes from a different sub-genre - a series of critically acclaimed private-eye novels - and the not-quite-ganglandish "Mystic River" and "Shutter Island," Lehane's new book is unquestionably a gangster novel.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
NEW YORK -- Partway through my Sunday panel at the Brooklyn Book Festival, the subject turned to archetypes of Los Angeles. We - the novelists Seth Greenland (“The Angry Buddhist”),  Emma Straub (“Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures”), Karolina Waclawiak (“How to Get Into the Twin Palms”) and myself - were there to discuss the literature of Southern California. Cognitive dissonance, perhaps … or maybe a sign that, 55 years after L.A. stole the Dodgers, Brooklyn has come around.
NEWS
December 16, 2010 | By Tim Swanson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's a scene that gives the phrase "getting shelled at Fenway" a whole new meaning. In the crime thriller "The Town," a local heist crew attempts one of the riskiest jobs in recent memory: taking down the cash room at Fenway Park, home of Boston's beloved Red Sox baseball team. After FBI agents are tipped off to the caper, automatic weapons bark as violence spills from the stadium's bowels out onto the city's historic streets. The action sequence's well-known location certainly heightens the stakes of the heist (isn't it a cardinal sin to loot the Cathedral of Boston?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Is there an actor who's been taking on more colorful roles lately than James Gandolfini? In the last few months he's been a blitzed-out hit man (“Killing Them Softly”), self-promoting casino magnate (this weekend's “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone”), hectoring immigrant dad (“Not Fade Away”). And, oh yeah, Leon Panetta (“Zero Dark Thirty”). Gandolfini is adding another notch to that list. According to a person familiar with the production who was not authorized to talk about it publicly, he'll play opposite Tom Hardy - will play Hardy's cousin, actually - in “Animal Rescue,” the new movie written by Dennis Lehane that Fox Searchlight is just beginning to shoot.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
NEW YORK -- Partway through my Sunday panel at the Brooklyn Book Festival, the subject turned to archetypes of Los Angeles. We - the novelists Seth Greenland (“The Angry Buddhist”),  Emma Straub (“Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures”), Karolina Waclawiak (“How to Get Into the Twin Palms”) and myself - were there to discuss the literature of Southern California. Cognitive dissonance, perhaps … or maybe a sign that, 55 years after L.A. stole the Dodgers, Brooklyn has come around.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For the last decade, Dennis Lehane has been resolute in interviews and appearances that Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro, the popular private-eye team who starred in his first five books, weren't returning any time soon. But like any smart author worth his or her salt, especially someone with the bestsellers "Mystic River" and "Shutter Island" under his belt, he left the door open for them to return if they so chose. Now, to the delight of his longest-serving fans, Patrick and Angie have returned in "Moonlight Mile," a sequel to Lehane's 1998 bestseller (and basis for the 2007 film)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Times
Forty years ago, in 1970, the young George V. Higgins was working as a federal prosecutor in Boston. By then he'd graduated from Boston College, done a creative writing course at Stanford and worked as a newspaperman before going back to school to study law. He'd written a string of unpublished books and his latest, "The Friends of Eddie Coyle" (Picador: 182 pp., $14 paper), had already been rejected many times. But Alfred A. Knopf decided to take a chance, offering Higgins the not-so-princely sum of $2,000 for the novel.
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