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Dennis Szakacs

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By David Ng
Dennis Szakacs, who has served as the director and chief executive officer of the Orange County Museum of Art since 2003, will be stepping down from his position at the end of the year, the museum announced on Thursday. Szakacs said in a statement sent by the museum that he is leaving OCMA to "explore new opportunities. " The museum said its board has formed a search committee and engaged the services of a search firm to find its next director and CEO. In a phone interview, Szakacs said that it was his decision to step down and that he is leaving because "I felt I had accomplished what I came to do. " He described the museum as being in good financial health.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By David Ng
Dennis Szakacs, who has served as the director and chief executive officer of the Orange County Museum of Art since 2003, will be stepping down from his position at the end of the year, the museum announced on Thursday. Szakacs said in a statement sent by the museum that he is leaving OCMA to "explore new opportunities. " The museum said its board has formed a search committee and engaged the services of a search firm to find its next director and CEO. In a phone interview, Szakacs said that it was his decision to step down and that he is leaving because "I felt I had accomplished what I came to do. " He described the museum as being in good financial health.
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OPINION
July 9, 2009
A questionable deal is a lot like art. No one can define it, but people know it when they see it. What everybody knows is that at least a couple of the paintings recently sold by the Orange County Museum of Art were stellar examples of California Impressionism. Yet no one except the museum's director and a few others know why they were sold so secretly, for such an apparently low price, or to whom.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Here's one tangible sign of the beneficial effect of Pacific Standard Time, the Getty-sponsored initiative to exhume the mostly under-recognized history of important Los Angeles art in the first generation after World War II: Southern California museums are now competing over the legacy. How high have the stakes quickly become? Let's just say the competition is so eager that it doesn't always mean a fair fight. One museum has publicly announced plans to organize a retrospective of a major but under-sung L.A. painter - even though officials knew that another museum already had the same show in the works for several months.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
For years, cutting-edge contemporary art has been one of L.A.'s greatest exports. Biennial curators from other cities fly here to do studio visits, make discoveries and take them back home. Now the Hammer Museum has teamed with nonprofit gallery LAX Art to reclaim the home turf and tap into the huge community of young artists living here. A team of curators from the institutions are planning a large-scale biennial, starting in 2012, featuring artists from the L.A. area. The exhibition will take place at both spaces as well as public sites in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2009 | Mike Boehm
If you want to know who the private collector was who got what many consider a great deal on 18 California Impressionist paintings from the Orange County Museum of Art, just ask Dennis Szakacs, OCMA's director. That is, as long as you are one of his fellow museum professionals and have an interest in borrowing some of the early 20th century works for an exhibition, or in cultivating as a philanthropic patron somebody who could afford the $963,000 outlay for the paintings, and is described by Szakacs as a champion of the popular style that's also often called plein-air painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Here's one tangible sign of the beneficial effect of Pacific Standard Time, the Getty-sponsored initiative to exhume the mostly under-recognized history of important Los Angeles art in the first generation after World War II: Southern California museums are now competing over the legacy. How high have the stakes quickly become? Let's just say the competition is so eager that it doesn't always mean a fair fight. One museum has publicly announced plans to organize a retrospective of a major but under-sung L.A. painter - even though officials knew that another museum already had the same show in the works for several months.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County Museum of Art on Monday announced that Dennis Szakacs, who has spent the last seven years as an executive at contemporary arts institutions in New York City, will be its new director.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The director of the Laguna Art Museum wants to find the unidentified art collector who quietly bought a prized cache of early 20th century California Impressionist paintings from the Orange County Museum of Art -- in hopes of persuading the new owner to donate or sell the 18 works to his museum. OCMA's director, Dennis Szakacs, said the museum got $963,000 for the 18 works in a private sale in March that just came to light this week. The museum promised the buyer anonymity. But experts are saying that two key paintings in the group, Granville Redmond's "Silver and Gold" and William Wendt's "Spring in the Canyon," could each be worth as much as OCMA received for all 18. Whitney Ganz, director of William A. Karges Fine Art in L.A., added his voice to those astonished that OCMA let its paintings go for $963,000, when the two star attractions alone, in their opinion, should have fetched $1.5 million or more.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
"Richard Diebenkorn: The Ocean Park Series, 1967-1985," a highly anticipated exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art, has been postponed for six months. Originally scheduled to open Oct. 11, 2009, as the museum's fall headliner, the show will be launched April 4, 2010, OCMA Director Dennis Szakacs said. The primary reason for the schedule change is financial, a museum representative said. The museum's leaders decided that it would be imprudent to present two particularly expensive exhibitions -- "Illumination: The Paintings of Georgia O'Keeffe, Agnes Pelton, Agnes Martin and Florence Pierce" and the Diebenkorn show -- in one year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
For years, cutting-edge contemporary art has been one of L.A.'s greatest exports. Biennial curators from other cities fly here to do studio visits, make discoveries and take them back home. Now the Hammer Museum has teamed with nonprofit gallery LAX Art to reclaim the home turf and tap into the huge community of young artists living here. A team of curators from the institutions are planning a large-scale biennial, starting in 2012, featuring artists from the L.A. area. The exhibition will take place at both spaces as well as public sites in the area.
OPINION
July 9, 2009
A questionable deal is a lot like art. No one can define it, but people know it when they see it. What everybody knows is that at least a couple of the paintings recently sold by the Orange County Museum of Art were stellar examples of California Impressionism. Yet no one except the museum's director and a few others know why they were sold so secretly, for such an apparently low price, or to whom.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2009 | Mike Boehm
If you want to know who the private collector was who got what many consider a great deal on 18 California Impressionist paintings from the Orange County Museum of Art, just ask Dennis Szakacs, OCMA's director. That is, as long as you are one of his fellow museum professionals and have an interest in borrowing some of the early 20th century works for an exhibition, or in cultivating as a philanthropic patron somebody who could afford the $963,000 outlay for the paintings, and is described by Szakacs as a champion of the popular style that's also often called plein-air painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The director of the Laguna Art Museum wants to find the unidentified art collector who quietly bought a prized cache of early 20th century California Impressionist paintings from the Orange County Museum of Art -- in hopes of persuading the new owner to donate or sell the 18 works to his museum. OCMA's director, Dennis Szakacs, said the museum got $963,000 for the 18 works in a private sale in March that just came to light this week. The museum promised the buyer anonymity. But experts are saying that two key paintings in the group, Granville Redmond's "Silver and Gold" and William Wendt's "Spring in the Canyon," could each be worth as much as OCMA received for all 18. Whitney Ganz, director of William A. Karges Fine Art in L.A., added his voice to those astonished that OCMA let its paintings go for $963,000, when the two star attractions alone, in their opinion, should have fetched $1.5 million or more.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County Museum of Art on Monday announced that Dennis Szakacs, who has spent the last seven years as an executive at contemporary arts institutions in New York City, will be its new director.
OPINION
July 21, 2009
Re "Paintings' quiet sale stumps art world," July 5 All of us in Orange County should be grateful to The Times for your reporting on this matter. At the very least, the Orange County Museum of Art is guilty of removing a community resource from the public domain. At most, the whole thing may involve conflict of interest or worse. Why is OCMA so secretive about who appraised the paintings and who bought them, if it has nothing to hide? Your article cited the standards of the Assn.
NEWS
November 10, 2005 | Mike Boehm
The Orange County Museum of Art is exploring whether a new museum topped by a condominium high-rise will fly with Costa Mesa officials. The idea, submitted to the city's planning department this week, calls for relocating the modern and contemporary art institution from its longtime Newport Beach home to a parcel that shopping center magnate Henry T. Segerstrom donated to the Orange County Performing Arts Center for a new concert hall due to open next fall.
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