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Density

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1989
A new Palos Verdes Peninsula political organization aimed at preserving open space and wildlife will hold an organizational meeting tonight at 7:30 in the community room at the Shops of Palos Verdes in Rolling Hills Estates. Chris Manning, a Rancho Palos Verdes resident and Loyola Marymount University professor, said the group--called STOP (Save the Open Places)--was formed over concern about what he termed high density development, particularly a retirement center recently approved by the Rancho Palos Verdes City Council and resort hotels proposed along that city's coastline.
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HOME & GARDEN
May 11, 2006
THE elegant architecture of Lorcan O'Herlihy graces West Hollywood ["First Sprouts of a Vertical Cityscape," May 4] and proves that reasonable increases in density can enhance our urban environment. It is ironic that the City Council in West Hollywood has ignored these lessons and has recently approved plans to develop five- and 10-story "big box" mixed-use projects along Santa Monica Boulevard. O'Herlihy has shown that bigger is not necessarily better and that urban in-fill development need not destroy the character of our neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1989
Torrance City Council has not seen such excess and greed for a long time. But last Tuesday during the "Demolition Ban Hearing," (Times, April 27) the greed was right up front! Perhaps we who live here should start wearing black arm bands. How much are we supposed to put up with? Traffic, Mobil, smog, too many people, density! Enough is enough. MARY COOPER Torrance
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1991
As one who led the loyal opposition to Dana Point cityhood, I'm now perplexed by the flurry of vitriolic letters about the city's new general plan ("Votes for and Against Referendum on the Dana Point General Plan," Aug. 25). The writers somehow seem to feel that it is a prescription for rampant growth. Horsefeathers! As opponents to cityhood, we were naturally concerned about uncontrolled growth under city leadership, but, in all fairness, we were wrong. Good sense prevailed and the general plan provides for considerably less density and traffic congestion for the large, remaining empty parcels in the Headlands and in Monarch Beach.
REAL ESTATE
August 5, 1990
In "A Maturing L.A. Grows Up and In" (July 29), Greg Krikorian quotes Dan Garcia, former Los Angeles city planning commissioner: "Whether we like it or not . . . infill development provides opportunities to build the city without continuing our urban sprawl." That's the kind of density-increasing, pro-development tripe that's contributing to destruction of the quality of life throughout Southern California. Density, not urban sprawl, is the major threat to many fine neighborhoods where crime, traffic congestion, overcrowded schools, parks and public facilities, and urban blight are driving people out of their homes.
REAL ESTATE
May 8, 1988
I have been following the debate about "no growth" or "slow growth" in Los Angeles. I am alarmed that opponents to growth (any type of growth) have a disproportionate impact on city council members, and the voice of reason is seldom heard. Here are certain rational observations: 1--Contrary to popular belief, new residential construction is not aimed at "newcomers" to Southern California; rather, it addresses the housing needs of local residents who have improved their financial status and seek better living quarters.
OPINION
January 17, 1999
The adage "an empty can makes the most noise" was never more evident than in the Dec. 27 story dealing with development in the Santa Monica Mountains. The story made a great deal of noise but totally ignored the vital facts. The article failed to report that the 37 plan amendments resulted in only 814 additional homes--an average of about 80 homes a year. Hardly a building boom! By way of comparison, Ventura County (which The Times lauds as an example of responsible development controls)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2009 | Tony Perry
A 73-year-old Bonita man was arrested Thursday and charged with posing as a doctor and selling phony, possibly dangerous, cancer cures. Kurt Walter Donsbach was arrested during his Internet radio show. One patient allegedly paid thousands of dollars for steroids supplied by Donsbach, leading to severe bone density loss. Donsbach is being held in San Diego County Jail on $1.5-million bail. "This defendant preyed on vulnerable patients," said Dist. Atty. Bonnie Dumanis. -- Tony Perry
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1997
Re Lyn Meyer's letter Jan. 12. Lang Ranch was originally slated for development in the 1970s. In the early 1980s, Thousand Oaks City Council action to restrict the development, following the passage of Measure A , resulted in a major lawsuit. The city lost, and a judge made the final determination about Lang Ranch's size and density years ago. The "pro-business" City Council had nothing to do with any of it. I agree that the result is a tragedy, but please, let's look at facts before placing blame where it doesn't belong.
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