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Denver Art Museum

ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2000 | ROBERT WELLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
When Georgia O'Keeffe first saw the West, she knew it was her country. With the first sunset she also knew she shouldn't say too much because others might like it as much as she. "And I don't want them interested," she said. Her paintings said it all, though, and like the works of many other artists, she couldn't help but entice the curious. "It is hard to overstate the role art played in bringing people West.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
An exhibition of Japanese paintings that caused a stir last fall in New York recently arrived at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. "The Paintings of Jakuchu," which features an astonishing range of works by one of 18th-Century Japan's authentically great individualists, is certain to captivate aficionados as well as visitors who just wander into the museum.
NEWS
July 27, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"COLLAR and Bow" -- a major outdoor sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, designed for the Walt Disney Concert Hall and scheduled to be installed this summer -- has been put on hold, stalled by a technical problem requiring two components to be rebuilt at a cost that may be prohibitive, the Music Center and the artists say. The 65-foot-tall metal and fiberglass sculpture takes the shape of a men's dress shirt collar and bowtie.
IMAGE
March 25, 2012 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Fashion exhibitions at museums, like the "Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty" show that set attendance records at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2011, are more popular than ever. Here is a selection of what's on now and what's coming soon, in the U.S. and abroad. Diana Vreeland After Diana Vreeland | Dedicated to the style and passion of the late fashion icon, editor, traveler and Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute curator. Vreeland also worked as a special consultant to the museum from 1972 to the time of her death in 1989, setting the international standard for costume exhibitions.
TRAVEL
October 10, 2010 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
They're a disparate lot ? museums, hotels, an observation deck, a sculpture park and a sundial-shaped bridge ? but these recent structures, none more than 10 years old, are redefining the West. Before we bow to them, though, let's admit that it's been a good decade too for landmark renewal, including San Francisco's Ferry Building (www.ferrybuildingmarketplace.com), a transit hub reborn in 2003 as a foodie mall; Sausalito's Cavallo Point, an Army post born again in 2008 as a luxury lodge (www.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just think of Pamela R. Lessing Friedman's art collection as a message in a bottle. In 200 Chinese snuff bottles, to be precise--133 of which are on display at Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana, and many of which are decorated with symbols and the pictorial wordplay known as rebuses. "The Chinese language lends itself to pictorial puns," Friedman said recently by phone from her home near Denver. "It's filled with homonyms--sounds that are the same but have different meanings.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
Anyone looking for signs that Daniel Libeskind's work might deepen profoundly over time, or shift in some surprising direction, has mostly been doing so in vain. After winning the master-plan competition at the ground zero site in New York in 2003, and subsequently landing commissions all over the world, he seemed content to stamp the same jagged, mournful aesthetic on each of his new buildings, whether it was a museum in Copenhagen or Denver or a condominium tower in Covington, Ky. Even as the World Trade Center rebuilding effort collapsed around him, he smiled his Hillary smile and told everybody nothing was wrong, that he was moving forward, still thrilled to have the opportunity.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2007 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
MY first attempt at a complaint-free life lasted 15 minutes. Dropping the kids at school five days after a blizzard, I found the parking lot impassible and the sidewalks treacherous. "This place is a disaster!" I called to the principal. And instantly regretted it. Why harp on a situation no one could control? I should have thanked the principal for standing in the cold to make sure his students got in safely -- or brightened his day with a cheery hello.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | ARIELLA BUDICK, NEWSDAY
"Even when I was a young guy, people thought I was an old man," reflects artist Red Grooms. "My work looked folky and my name was peculiar. I sort of liked it, actually. I don't think it's so funny now." Grooms is 64 and the carrot-colored hair that inspired his moniker has turned gray. (His parents named him Charles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
It isn't easy to give away the J. Paul Getty Trust's money, but the Getty Grant Program has managed to disburse $20 million during its first five years of operation. Five hundred and thirty grants have been awarded to art historians, conservators and art museums in 18 countries.
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