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Denver Art Museum

NEWS
July 27, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"COLLAR and Bow" -- a major outdoor sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, designed for the Walt Disney Concert Hall and scheduled to be installed this summer -- has been put on hold, stalled by a technical problem requiring two components to be rebuilt at a cost that may be prohibitive, the Music Center and the artists say. The 65-foot-tall metal and fiberglass sculpture takes the shape of a men's dress shirt collar and bowtie.
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IMAGE
March 25, 2012 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Fashion exhibitions at museums, like the "Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty" show that set attendance records at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2011, are more popular than ever. Here is a selection of what's on now and what's coming soon, in the U.S. and abroad. Diana Vreeland After Diana Vreeland | Dedicated to the style and passion of the late fashion icon, editor, traveler and Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute curator. Vreeland also worked as a special consultant to the museum from 1972 to the time of her death in 1989, setting the international standard for costume exhibitions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Philip B. Meggs, who wrote the first definitive history of graphic and advertising design from the beginning of the written language through the printing press and on to the computer, has died. He was 60. Meggs died of leukemia Nov. 24 in Richmond, Va. A graphic designer for commercial industry and then a college instructor and dean, Meggs said he wrote because of his need to give his students a foundation for all that had gone before.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Museums risk consequences if they treat native peoples' spiritual objects simply as regular artworks, as the Seattle Art Museum learned this week when it briefly wagered a ceremonial tribal mask from British Columbia in a playful bet with the Denver Art Museum on Sunday's Super Bowl. The two museums announced early this week that a 135-year-old Nuxalk mask would be sent from Seattle to Denver as a three-month loan if the Denver Broncos won the game, and "The Broncho Buster," an 1895 bronze statue by Frederic Remington, would head in the opposite direction should the Seattle Seahawks prevail.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Suzanne Muchnic
When June Pardue got the call at her home in Sutton, Alaska, her response wasn't yes or no. It was: "How did you find me?" For Carol Emarthle-Douglas, who lives in suburban Seattle, the question was how to fit the invitation into her schedule. But one by one, 13 American Indian basket weavers -- in Arizona, Nevada, California, Michigan, Louisiana and beyond -- were tracked down by Los Angeles' Southwest Museum#23lummis and enlisted as consultants for "The Art of Native American Basketry: A Living Tradition," a revealing exhibition at the Autry Museum of the American West in Griffith Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | ARIELLA BUDICK, NEWSDAY
"Even when I was a young guy, people thought I was an old man," reflects artist Red Grooms. "My work looked folky and my name was peculiar. I sort of liked it, actually. I don't think it's so funny now." Grooms is 64 and the carrot-colored hair that inspired his moniker has turned gray. (His parents named him Charles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
It isn't easy to give away the J. Paul Getty Trust's money, but the Getty Grant Program has managed to disburse $20 million during its first five years of operation. Five hundred and thirty grants have been awarded to art historians, conservators and art museums in 18 countries.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
They wear white cowboy hats, rescue the innocent and round up the strays. They're volunteer "ambassadors" who roam cavernous Denver International Airport, looking for lost and confused travelers. They can speed your way to baggage claim, help you negotiate security and keep you from missing your flight. There are similar cadres of volunteers at many airports, although no one seems to know exactly how many.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Fourteen months ago, Richard Ehrlich left his office at the UCLA Medical Center, flew to Berlin and rented the best digital camera available. With the 39-megapixel Hasselblad safely stowed, he drove about 250 miles to the small town of Bad Arolsen and found his way to the International Tracing Service. Ehrlich, a veteran urological surgeon with a second career in photography, had pulled plenty of strings to take pictures in the sprawling, six-building complex. But what he found was beyond comprehension: 50 million documents of Nazi atrocities in the world's largest Holocaust archive.
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