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Denver Art Museum

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2001 | GIOVANNA DELL'ORTO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Log buildings still standing among the wind-battered pinons create the illusion that not much has changed here since this onetime Army post was established on Indian land in the late 19th century. But to Ramon Riley, something crucial is missing from the fort that now is host to the White Mountain Apache Tribe's cultural center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Most arguments don't make much sense to outsiders. Take, for example, Art Center College of Design's current exhibition, "Masterworks: Italian Design, 1960-1994." It presents some 145 examples of furniture, glass, metal and ceramics plus techno stuff like high-intensity lamps, telephones and typewriters. Remember typewriters? The exhibition--handsomely installed by Williamson Gallery director Stephen Nowlin--was organized as a traveling show by the Denver Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2000 | ROBERT WELLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
When Georgia O'Keeffe first saw the West, she knew it was her country. With the first sunset she also knew she shouldn't say too much because others might like it as much as she. "And I don't want them interested," she said. Her paintings said it all, though, and like the works of many other artists, she couldn't help but entice the curious. "It is hard to overstate the role art played in bringing people West.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
An exhibition of Japanese paintings that caused a stir last fall in New York recently arrived at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. "The Paintings of Jakuchu," which features an astonishing range of works by one of 18th-Century Japan's authentically great individualists, is certain to captivate aficionados as well as visitors who just wander into the museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Philip B. Meggs, who wrote the first definitive history of graphic and advertising design from the beginning of the written language through the printing press and on to the computer, has died. He was 60. Meggs died of leukemia Nov. 24 in Richmond, Va. A graphic designer for commercial industry and then a college instructor and dean, Meggs said he wrote because of his need to give his students a foundation for all that had gone before.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | ARIELLA BUDICK, NEWSDAY
"Even when I was a young guy, people thought I was an old man," reflects artist Red Grooms. "My work looked folky and my name was peculiar. I sort of liked it, actually. I don't think it's so funny now." Grooms is 64 and the carrot-colored hair that inspired his moniker has turned gray. (His parents named him Charles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
It isn't easy to give away the J. Paul Getty Trust's money, but the Getty Grant Program has managed to disburse $20 million during its first five years of operation. Five hundred and thirty grants have been awarded to art historians, conservators and art museums in 18 countries.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
They wear white cowboy hats, rescue the innocent and round up the strays. They're volunteer "ambassadors" who roam cavernous Denver International Airport, looking for lost and confused travelers. They can speed your way to baggage claim, help you negotiate security and keep you from missing your flight. There are similar cadres of volunteers at many airports, although no one seems to know exactly how many.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
A livable town, Denver, so say the travel magazines. Beers are carefully handcrafted, bicycles are tolerated, spiffy European-style streetcars glide down wide streets. The sky is big, and the Rockies beckon. So do art and culture. Despite the recent controversy in a small town 30 miles east of here, where an elementary schoolteacher was suspended for showing excerpts from a children's video of Gounod's "Faust" with a depiction of the devil, Denver is bullish on the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just think of Pamela R. Lessing Friedman's art collection as a message in a bottle. In 200 Chinese snuff bottles, to be precise--133 of which are on display at Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana, and many of which are decorated with symbols and the pictorial wordplay known as rebuses. "The Chinese language lends itself to pictorial puns," Friedman said recently by phone from her home near Denver. "It's filled with homonyms--sounds that are the same but have different meanings.
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