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Denver Art Museum

ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
An exhibition of Japanese paintings that caused a stir last fall in New York recently arrived at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. "The Paintings of Jakuchu," which features an astonishing range of works by one of 18th-Century Japan's authentically great individualists, is certain to captivate aficionados as well as visitors who just wander into the museum.
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NEWS
July 27, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"COLLAR and Bow" -- a major outdoor sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, designed for the Walt Disney Concert Hall and scheduled to be installed this summer -- has been put on hold, stalled by a technical problem requiring two components to be rebuilt at a cost that may be prohibitive, the Music Center and the artists say. The 65-foot-tall metal and fiberglass sculpture takes the shape of a men's dress shirt collar and bowtie.
IMAGE
March 25, 2012 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Fashion exhibitions at museums, like the "Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty" show that set attendance records at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2011, are more popular than ever. Here is a selection of what's on now and what's coming soon, in the U.S. and abroad. Diana Vreeland After Diana Vreeland | Dedicated to the style and passion of the late fashion icon, editor, traveler and Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute curator. Vreeland also worked as a special consultant to the museum from 1972 to the time of her death in 1989, setting the international standard for costume exhibitions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Philip B. Meggs, who wrote the first definitive history of graphic and advertising design from the beginning of the written language through the printing press and on to the computer, has died. He was 60. Meggs died of leukemia Nov. 24 in Richmond, Va. A graphic designer for commercial industry and then a college instructor and dean, Meggs said he wrote because of his need to give his students a foundation for all that had gone before.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | ARIELLA BUDICK, NEWSDAY
"Even when I was a young guy, people thought I was an old man," reflects artist Red Grooms. "My work looked folky and my name was peculiar. I sort of liked it, actually. I don't think it's so funny now." Grooms is 64 and the carrot-colored hair that inspired his moniker has turned gray. (His parents named him Charles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
It isn't easy to give away the J. Paul Getty Trust's money, but the Getty Grant Program has managed to disburse $20 million during its first five years of operation. Five hundred and thirty grants have been awarded to art historians, conservators and art museums in 18 countries.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
They wear white cowboy hats, rescue the innocent and round up the strays. They're volunteer "ambassadors" who roam cavernous Denver International Airport, looking for lost and confused travelers. They can speed your way to baggage claim, help you negotiate security and keep you from missing your flight. There are similar cadres of volunteers at many airports, although no one seems to know exactly how many.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
A livable town, Denver, so say the travel magazines. Beers are carefully handcrafted, bicycles are tolerated, spiffy European-style streetcars glide down wide streets. The sky is big, and the Rockies beckon. So do art and culture. Despite the recent controversy in a small town 30 miles east of here, where an elementary schoolteacher was suspended for showing excerpts from a children's video of Gounod's "Faust" with a depiction of the devil, Denver is bullish on the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Fourteen months ago, Richard Ehrlich left his office at the UCLA Medical Center, flew to Berlin and rented the best digital camera available. With the 39-megapixel Hasselblad safely stowed, he drove about 250 miles to the small town of Bad Arolsen and found his way to the International Tracing Service. Ehrlich, a veteran urological surgeon with a second career in photography, had pulled plenty of strings to take pictures in the sprawling, six-building complex. But what he found was beyond comprehension: 50 million documents of Nazi atrocities in the world's largest Holocaust archive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just think of Pamela R. Lessing Friedman's art collection as a message in a bottle. In 200 Chinese snuff bottles, to be precise--133 of which are on display at Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana, and many of which are decorated with symbols and the pictorial wordplay known as rebuses. "The Chinese language lends itself to pictorial puns," Friedman said recently by phone from her home near Denver. "It's filled with homonyms--sounds that are the same but have different meanings.
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