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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strong expression of support for building the next generation of military jets at Palmdale's Plant 42, California's entire congressional delegation has signed a letter asking the Department of Defense to compare production costs there with costs at any other facility. The contract to build the Joint Strike Fighter could be worth up to $750 billion over 25 years and is expected to generate thousands of new jobs in the region where it is built. The Oct.
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NATIONAL
October 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Congress is set to allow the Pentagon to keep new pictures of foreign detainees abused by their U.S. captors from the public, a move intended to end a legal fight over the photographs' release that has reached the Supreme Court. Federal courts have rejected the government's arguments against the release of 21 color photographs showing prisoners in Afghanistan and Iraq being abused by Americans. The Obama administration believes that giving the Defense secretary the imminent grant of authority over the release of such pictures would short-circuit a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union under the Freedom of Information Act. The White House is asking the justices to put off consideration of the case until after a vote on the measure in the House and Senate, as early as this week.
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NEWS
January 5, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preparing to leave office after a period of historic change in the American military, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney predicted Monday that his successor will become more conservative as he steps into his new role and cautioned him not to base "long-term national security policy on the assumption that all is well in Moscow." In a wide-ranging farewell interview 17 days before leaving office, Cheney said that his successor, Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2009 | Associated Press
House Democratic leaders said Monday that they would not force the Pentagon to buy four new passenger jets used to ferry senior government officials. Democrats have been criticized for adding $330 million to the Air Force's 2010 budget to buy the jets, even though the Pentagon didn't request the money. Two of the planes would be the C-37 -- the military equivalent to the fancy Gulfstream G550 -- and cost taxpayers $130 million at a time when lawmakers have made villains of bailed-out auto executives who rely on corporate jets to travel.
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ehud Tenenbaum was arrested on suspicion of hacking his way into Pentagon and other sensitive computer systems, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was openly admiring of the young Israeli, lauding his skills as "damn good." Netanyahu added that the 18-year-old was "dangerous too." But the Israeli prime minister's praise made an instant celebrity of a young man suspected of leading the most serious attack on the Pentagon's computers and breaking into as many as 700 sites worldwide.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All 23 American prisoners of war captured by Iraqi forces during Operation Desert Storm, including two U.S. servicewomen, were tortured or abused by their captors, a top Defense Department official told U.S. lawmakers Thursday. In several instances, Iraqi interrogators broke bones, perforated eardrums and threatened to shoot or dismember the American prisoners in their custody, Army Col. Bill Jordan said in testimony before Congress' Human Rights Caucus.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. armed forces have lost more than 100 lives and more than $1 billion in sophisticated aircraft at air shows, flight demonstrations and various publicity events since 1955, an investigation by The Times has disclosed. A list of 115 accidents involving Army, Navy and Air Force aircraft participating in shows and demonstration events was compiled on the basis of more than a dozen inquiries over the past year under the federal Freedom of Information Act.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The more than 500,000 U.S. veterans who are likely to die this year will be the first to be guaranteed military honors at their funerals under a Defense Department policy that went into effect Jan. 1. The policy is a reversal for the Pentagon, which has held for years that, although no institution has more interest in honoring veterans, military honor guards are impractical in an era when so many veterans are dying and so many military bases are closing.
NEWS
March 9, 1997 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A number of medical professionals, who say they've become ill while treating Gulf War veterans, claim the mysterious disease afflicting tens of thousands of soldiers is contagious and could pose a public health threat. Doctors, nurses, laboratory researchers, as well as others who come in casual contact with Gulf War veterans, say they've contracted the same symptoms--fatigue, fever, aches, rashes and respiratory problems--that are generally associated with "Gulf War syndrome."
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American soldier whose death during a ground battle in the Persian Gulf War was described in two front-page articles in The Times was killed not by Iraqi forces, as had been believed, but by a mistaken barrage from a U.S. M1-A1 tank, military officials said Wednesday. Army Specialist Clarence Allen Cash, 20, of Ashland, Ohio, was among the 35 U.S. soldiers now acknowledged by the Defense Department to have been killed during the war by so-called "friendly fire."
WORLD
August 3, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Far from the prestigious windowed offices on the outer ring of the Pentagon, a new war room focusing entirely on the conflicts in Afghanistan and Pakistan sits deep inside a cavernous basement. Created by Navy Adm. Michael G. Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Pakistan Afghanistan Coordination Cell is intended to bring together the Pentagon's top strategy and intelligence experts. The cell is also a visible symbol of how much the related conflicts have become Mullen's war.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2009 | Peter Pae
In a blow to Boeing Co.'s defense business, the Pentagon on Tuesday said it was curtailing plans to develop a new generation of weapons and computer technologies for the U.S. Army. The Army's biggest development program, dubbed Future Combat Systems, or FCS, was initially projected to cost $160 billion. But the Pentagon said it was canceling a major component of the program to develop new manned vehicles at a cost of $87 billion.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
The country's top uniformed officer said Monday that the Defense Department should be ready to tell civilian leaders when military force is not the best response -- and be prepared to transfer resources to other agencies during times of crisis. Adm. Michael G. Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, previously has made the case for nonmilitary solutions to world problems, but his comments Monday were his most forceful to date on the subject.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2009 | David Wood
After firing the two top Air Force leaders last year for a series of embarrassing nuclear weapons mishaps, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates was told Thursday that the same problems of inexperience, poor training and splintered authority over nuclear arms affect the entire Pentagon, including its top leadership. A task force headed by former Defense Secretary James R.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Barnes is a writer in our Washington bureau.
For months, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has criticized the Pentagon's spending priorities but has done little to change them, choosing instead to leave the most difficult decisions to the next administration. With the announcement by President-elect Barack Obama last week that Gates will remain in his job in the new administration, the Defense chief has been given broad new power to reshape how the Pentagon selects, designs and builds new weapons systems.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Paul Richter and Christi Parsons, Barnes, Richter and Parsons are writers in our Washington bureau.
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has agreed to serve in President-elect Barack Obama's Cabinet, advisors said Tuesday, setting up the unusual situation in which a wartime Pentagon chief remains to work under a president who has condemned the previous administration's policies. An official close to the Obama transition team said it was likely that Gates would be named Defense secretary when the president-elect begins to unveil his national security team in announcements expected next week.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon is about to embark on a sweeping reorganization of the Naval Investigative Service, the largely civilian Navy law-enforcement arm that was accused by the Defense Department on Thursday of botching the investigation of the Tailhook affair.
NEWS
January 19, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Navy Adm. Bobby Ray Inman abruptly withdrew Tuesday as President Clinton's nominee for defense secretary, saying he had been troubled by attacks on his reputation and by "reports" that Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) was preparing to begin a campaign against him. The surprise withdrawal stunned official Washington and the defense community.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2008 | David Zucchino, Zucchino is a Times staff writer.
Marine Cpl. James Dixon was wounded twice in Iraq -- by a roadside bomb and a land mine. He suffered a traumatic brain injury, a concussion, a dislocated hip and hearing loss. He was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. Army Sgt. Lori Meshell shattered a hip and crushed her back and knees while diving for cover during a mortar attack in Iraq. She has undergone a hip replacement and knee reconstruction and needs at least three more surgeries.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Further tightening rules meant to prevent the abuse of detainees, the Pentagon has issued a new policy directive requiring that interrogations of prisoners be monitored, even if questioning is being carried out by another government agency. Under previous rules, non-Pentagon interrogators were required to follow strict rules in the Army Field Manual when questioning prisoners at military facilities. But the new directive adds a requirement that those sessions be observed by military officials.
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