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NEWS
June 27, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
In a corner of history far from the Pentagon fraud scandal that is now consuming his life, Melvyn R. Paisley was a hero--a World War II ace fighter pilot with a reputation for daring and a raft of medals to prove it. Like every other fighter pilot of that time, the young Paisley lived by his wits and flew by the seat of his pants. In defense of his country he suffered permanent ear damage, but when the dogfights were over, Paisley was always the victor.
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BUSINESS
August 21, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Lockheed Martin Corp. beat Raytheon Co. for work worth as much $843 million to make laser targeting devices that allow Air Force F-16 pilots to drop bombs with more precision from higher altitudes at day or night. Lockheed's Orlando, Fla., Missiles and Fire Control unit will develop and build as many as 522 of the so-called advanced targeting pods through 2010, with first deliveries in January 2003. The cost includes warranties, spare parts and logistics support, the Pentagon said.
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NEWS
January 26, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former commander of the Navy's elite counterterrorism unit, SEAL Team Six, was convicted Wednesday of conspiracy to defraud the government for his part in a $113,000 kickback scheme on a hand grenade contract. Retired Navy Cmdr. Richard Marcincko, 48, a highly decorated Vietnam combat veteran, faces five years in prison and $50,000 in fines following his conviction in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va. The jury acquitted him on a separate bribery count after a week of testimony.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon said Wednesday that it would cut off military contact between the United States and China. But it retreated within hours, saying the exchanges will be reviewed case by case and not automatically shut down. A Pentagon spokesman blamed several hours of confusion over what at first appeared to be a sharp turn in U.S. policy on a misinterpretation of Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's intent.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III testified before a federal grand jury Monday in an independent counsel's investigation of lobbying by former White House aide Lyn Nofziger on behalf of Fairchild Industries Inc. Independent counsel James C. McKay, who is also investigating efforts by Nofziger, Meese and others to help another defense contractor, Wedtech Corp., questioned Meese for 2 1/2 hours in his second appearance before the grand jury in three months.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal agents are conducting a criminal investigation into whether McDonnell Douglas officials violated federal procurement regulations in the purchase of multimillion-dollar tools for the Air Force's C-17 cargo jet program, according to industry sources and government officials. The FBI is examining McDonnell contracts issued to Jedav Industries Inc.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1990
In the heyday of the Vietnam War, Tony Tropin began working at Hughes Aircraft as an optical systems engineer. When the war ended and the aerospace industry suffered a collapse, Tropin managed to hold on to his Hughes job. But after surviving the ups and downs of the defense industry for 20 years, Tropin's luck finally expired last year. He was involuntarily retired from Hughes, one of 3,200 workers who were put out in 1989. An additional 6,100 Hughes workers left on their own.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
After a difficult and costly development effort that thrust the company into controversy, Hughes Aircraft unveiled Wednesday the first production model of its advanced medium-range, air-to-air missile. The missile, known as AMRAAM, is the first of 24,000 that will be built by Hughes and its competitor, Raytheon, by the year 2000 at a total cost of $7.58 billion. Foreign sales and licensing agreements will bring the companies additional business.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
United Technologies Corp. pleaded guilty to fraud and conspiracy Friday in connection with the "Ill Wind" Pentagon contracting scandal and agreed to pay $6 million in fines and penalties. The felony charges involved obtaining sensitive and confidential bid information on a radar control system for the Marine Corps and price data on engines for the Navy's F-404 jet. The information gave United Technologies unfair advantages in seeking military contracts.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | SUNNY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon canceled plans Wednesday to provide a public explanation of why it contracted with firms operating low-wage plants in China and other countries to manufacture millions of black berets for the U.S. Army. The Defense Department insisted that the decision had nothing to do with the delicate state of U.S.-China diplomacy after the collision Sunday of a Chinese fighter jet and a U.S. spy plane.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boeing Satellite Systems Inc., an El Segundo-based commercial satellite maker, said Wednesday that it won a contract potentially worth $1.3 billion to develop a constellation of satellites that would provide high-capacity communication links for the U.S. military. The contract is the largest since Boeing Co. acquired the former Hughes space and communications business in the fall and marks the first time that the subsidiary has been named as a prime contractor for the Air Force.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Lockheed Martin Corp. won't be required to spend as much as $150 million next year to build a West Coast facility to launch satellites because there won't be enough commercial launches to justify the expenditure, the Air Force said. The Pentagon is modifying a 1998 contract that required Lockheed and rival Boeing Co. to build launch pads at Vandenberg Air Force Base as they compete to build the nation's next generation of rockets to launch commercial and military satellites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
Congress approved $22 million in defense contracts for San Fernando Valley defense firms ITT Gilfillan and L-3 Communications Ocean Systems, Rep. Howard Berman (D-Mission Hills) announced Friday. "These funds will preserve good jobs in the Valley, and hopefully lead to the creation of significant new employment opportunities in the near future," Berman said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
To boost California's chances of landing the Joint Strike Fighter project, Gov. Gray Davis has notified Defense Department officials that the state would provide incentives worth $2.2 billion should the Pentagon build the aircraft in Palmdale, officials said Tuesday. In a letter to Defense Secretary William S. Cohen, Davis said the nation's largest defense contract should be awarded to California, where preliminary work on the project is underway.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2000 | Indraneel Sur
The Defense Department said it's awarding a $37.9-million contract over four years to TRW Inc.'s Carson-based Tactical Systems Division for an electronic system to protect troops against "friendly fire." Allied vehicles fitted with the Battlefield Combat Identification System kits send short, encrypted signals to each other to distinguish themselves from enemy targets. Development of the system came in response to recent high-profile friendly fire tragedies.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In August, AIL Systems Inc. plans to close the doors of its facility in Westlake Village and lay off most of the 290 employees there, ending the workers' role in the story of the U. S. Air Force's beleaguered B-1 bomber. AIL's employees will face a tough job market, joining thousands of Southern California aerospace industry workers who've lost their jobs recently.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swedlow Inc., a Garden Grove maker of aircraft windows, pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court to one charge of lying to the Air Force about flaws in windshields that it made for the B-1B bomber and agreed to pay a $400,000 fine. Under a plea bargain agreement, U.S. District Court Judge Alicemarie H. Stotler in Santa Ana dismissed three other fraud charges against the company.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Lockheed Martin Corp. will pay the U.S. government $5 million to settle claims that two subsidiaries overcharged the Navy for anti-submarine devices. The government paid between $1.8 million and $3.8 million too much for products from Nashua, N.H.-based Sanders, a Lockheed Martin company, and Georgia-based Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co.-Marietta, said U.S. Atty. Paul Gagnon. Sanders spokesman John Measell said the investigation centered on work performed for the Navy from 1989 to 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Corona firm that makes electronic gear used in U.S. military aircraft, radar and missile systems and two of the company's former executives have been indicted on federal fraud and conspiracy charges, the U.S. attorney's office said Thursday. Transchem Inc., a division of Jetronics Industries of Philadelphia, was named in an 18-count indictment, as were Timothy K. Aiu, 40, of Chino Hills and his brother, Ernest W. Aiu, 39, of Hacienda Heights.
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