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NEWS
December 7, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the heady '70s, when alleged drug baron Charles "Little Nut" Miller was living in Jamaica's slums, he was Cecil Connor, a political enforcer. That was more than a decade before the U.S. government indicted him, then protected him as a key federal witness who helped put two gang leaders in prison for life, only to have him emerge nearly a decade later as one of Washington's worst nightmares. Today, Miller is the target of one of the U.S.
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NATIONAL
September 17, 2009 | Jim Tankersley and Josh Meyer
The Justice Department is investigating whether former Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton illegally used her position to benefit Royal Dutch Shell PLC, the company that later hired her, according to officials in federal law enforcement and the Interior Department. The criminal investigation centers on the Interior Department's 2006 decision to award three lucrative oil shale leases on federal land in Colorado to a Shell subsidiary. Over the years it would take to extract the oil, according to calculations from Shell and a Rand Corp.
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NEWS
July 18, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer Bill L. Walters, who told a congressional committee in June that he was broke after defaulting on nearly $100 million in loans obtained from a Denver thrift with the help of Neil Bush, is now living in the lap of luxury here. In February, a trust for Walters' wife, Jacqueline, bought a $1.9-million gated estate near Newport Bay, according to county records reviewed by The Times.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2009 | Josh Meyer
The Justice Department prosecutor appointed this week to examine the CIA's interrogation program will revisit long-dormant abuse cases involving the agency's civilian contractors, bringing new attention to a little-known but controversial element of the Bush administration's war on terrorism. Civilian contractors used by the CIA at secret overseas facilities were accused of detainee abuses and deaths in a series of cases in the years following the U.S.-led invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, but only one was ever prosecuted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2006 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors are suing two accountants for allegedly running a fraudulent scheme that has enabled nearly three dozen Chumash Indians in Santa Barbara County to claim bogus tax deductions on millions of dollars in casino gambling profits. The accountants -- Kenneth Sorenson of Buellton and Stephen Drake of Arizona -- received more than $2 million in fees from members of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians who participated in the alleged scam, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in U.
WORLD
June 9, 2004 | Richard B. Schmitt and Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writers
U.S. Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft and his congressional critics clashed Tuesday about whether Justice Department legal opinions may have contributed to abuse -- or even torture -- of prisoners of war or other U.S. detainees. In a three-hour grilling that included threats of holding the attorney general in contempt of Congress for refusing to turn over information, Ashcroft was questioned about internal Justice Department memoranda from 2002 saying that, in interrogating Al Qaeda suspects, the U.S.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former U.S. attorney general called for a federal investigation into the death of an investigative reporter who had been looking at alleged Justice Department corruption. Joseph D. Casolaro, 44, of Fairfax, Va., was found dead Saturday in his Martinsburg, W.Va., hotel room, with his wrists slashed. Casolaro had warned friends and family that his investigation could threaten his life.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2003 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department on Thursday charged a North Hollywood wholesaler of adult films with violating federal obscenity laws, launching the first of what it promised would be a wave of criminal cases against purveyors of pornography.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1989 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators from the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission are examining links between indicted financier Michael Milken and a circle of failed and troubled savings and loans, including Lincoln Savings & Loan in Irvine, sources close to the investigations said Tuesday.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2009 | Josh Meyer
The FBI and Justice Department plan to significantly expand their role in global counter-terrorism operations, part of a U.S. policy shift that will replace a CIA-dominated system of clandestine detentions and interrogations with one built around transparent investigations and prosecutions. Under the "global justice" initiative, which has been in the works for several months, FBI agents will have a central role in overseas counter-terrorism cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2009 | Paloma Esquivel
In a quiet event during an otherwise well-publicized visit to Los Angeles this week, U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric Holder Jr. reached out to local Muslim American youths, calling on them to work with the government to fight violent extremism and pledging that the Justice Department would reinvigorate enforcement of civil rights and work to advance religious freedom.
NATIONAL
July 11, 2009 | Josh Meyer
The Bush administration's post-Sept. 11 surveillance efforts went beyond the widely publicized warrantless wiretapping program, a government report disclosed Friday, encompassing additional secretive activities that created "unprecedented" spying powers. The report also raised new questions about how the Bush White House kept key Justice Department officials in the dark as it launched the surveillance program.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2009 | Josh Meyer
The FBI and Justice Department plan to significantly expand their role in global counter-terrorism operations, part of a U.S. policy shift that will replace a CIA-dominated system of clandestine detentions and interrogations with one built around transparent investigations and prosecutions. Under the "global justice" initiative, which has been in the works for several months, FBI agents will have a central role in overseas counter-terrorism cases.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2009 | Washington Post
Karl Rove will be interviewed today as part of a criminal investigation into the firing of U.S. attorneys under President George W. Bush, two sources say. Rove, a former senior aide to Bush, will be questioned by Connecticut prosecutor Nora Dannehy, who in September was named to examine whether former Justice Department and White House officials lied or obstructed justice in connection with the dismissal of federal prosecutors in 2006. Robert Luskin, a lawyer for Rove, declined to comment.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2009 | Greg Miller
Rep. Jane Harman denied Monday that she had contacted the Justice Department to seek leniency for employees of a pro-Israeli lobbying organization under investigation for espionage. The Venice Democrat also said that she has never been told that she was involved in the FBI's probe of former officials of the American Israeli Public Affairs Committee.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2009 | Paul West
In the annals of capital partisanship, their names are boldfaced: the candidates for America's highest civil rights post who never got confirmed. During the last Democratic administration, conservatives succeeded in blocking Senate approval of Lani Guinier and Bill Lann Lee to head the civil rights division at the Justice Department. Now they're gearing up to put Thomas Perez, a Maryland lawyer and President Obama's nominee for the job, through the grinder.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Department Nazi-hunters moved Wednesday to strip U.S. citizenship from a Massachusetts man on the grounds that he hid his role in the mass murder and persecution of Jews while heading a unit of the Nazi-sponsored Lithuanian Security Police during World War II.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an action that prosecutors said could set a national precedent, the Justice Department obtained a court settlement Monday against a major thrift that allegedly refused to offer its services in predominantly black neighborhoods. The action against Chevy Chase Federal Savings Bank marks the first time the government has charged a lending institution with discriminating against an entire community because of racial composition.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2009 | Paul West and Richard Simon
Thomas Perez is Maryland's highest-ranking Latino, but his selection as the nation's leading civil rights enforcer has provoked sharp criticism from some Latino civil rights advocates. The criticism isn't directed at Perez, the state's secretary of labor and a first-generation Dominican American, or his qualifications.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2009 | Josh Meyer
For the last eight years, the Justice Department and the Bush administration were relatively quiet on the issue of race, its place within the social fabric of America and the enforcement of civil rights. But on Wednesday, Eric H. Holder Jr.
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