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NEWS
July 18, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer Bill L. Walters, who told a congressional committee in June that he was broke after defaulting on nearly $100 million in loans obtained from a Denver thrift with the help of Neil Bush, is now living in the lap of luxury here. In February, a trust for Walters' wife, Jacqueline, bought a $1.9-million gated estate near Newport Bay, according to county records reviewed by The Times.
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NATIONAL
May 15, 2009 | Washington Post
Karl Rove will be interviewed today as part of a criminal investigation into the firing of U.S. attorneys under President George W. Bush, two sources say. Rove, a former senior aide to Bush, will be questioned by Connecticut prosecutor Nora Dannehy, who in September was named to examine whether former Justice Department and White House officials lied or obstructed justice in connection with the dismissal of federal prosecutors in 2006. Robert Luskin, a lawyer for Rove, declined to comment.
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NEWS
August 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former U.S. attorney general called for a federal investigation into the death of an investigative reporter who had been looking at alleged Justice Department corruption. Joseph D. Casolaro, 44, of Fairfax, Va., was found dead Saturday in his Martinsburg, W.Va., hotel room, with his wrists slashed. Casolaro had warned friends and family that his investigation could threaten his life.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The Obama administration must be given copies of documents the Bush White House has been withholding from Congress on the firings of nine U.S. attorneys, U.S. District Judge John Bates ruled. The House Judiciary Committee has sought the documents as part of an investigation that led to the resignation of Atty. Gen. Alberto Gonzales. The Bush administration contended that it was required to give the documents to the National Archives. The House panel wanted them left at the White House.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1989 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators from the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission are examining links between indicted financier Michael Milken and a circle of failed and troubled savings and loans, including Lincoln Savings & Loan in Irvine, sources close to the investigations said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an action that prosecutors said could set a national precedent, the Justice Department obtained a court settlement Monday against a major thrift that allegedly refused to offer its services in predominantly black neighborhoods. The action against Chevy Chase Federal Savings Bank marks the first time the government has charged a lending institution with discriminating against an entire community because of racial composition.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juvenile crime has plummeted nationwide in recent years, with the arrest rate for murders dropping 68% since 1993 to its lowest level in more than three decades, according to a new federal analysis released Thursday. Crime is down across the board among juveniles in the last several years, from violent crimes such as murder and rape through less serious and more common offenses such as vandalism, truancy and drug-related crimes, the new statistics from the U.S. Justice Department show. Atty.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW and LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Eight Ivy League universities agreed Wednesday not to conspire in determining financial aid for students after the Justice Department charged them with antitrust violations in their assistance programs. But the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the ninth school named in the unprecedented government action, refused to sign the consent decree that would settle the civil suit and will go to trial.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | RANDY LEWIS and MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A proposed alliance between Orange County's two giant concert amphitheaters has prompted an investigation by the U.S. Justice Department's antitrust division, concert industry officials said Friday. But the deal, if approved, could end years of bitter rivalry between the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa and the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department moved Tuesday to obtain records from 173 banks on hundreds of accounts in which Colombian drug kingpins allegedly deposited nearly $400 million from selling cocaine in the United States. Department attorneys, seeking clues to complex money-laundering operations of the Medellin cartel, obtained federal court orders requiring the banks and other financial institutions to turn over information from 754 suspect accounts.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Meyer is a writer in our Washington bureau.
Former Justice Department official Eric H. Holder Jr. emerged Tuesday as Barack Obama's leading candidate for attorney general, and the president-elect's transition team was trying to gauge whether there was sufficient bipartisan support for him in the Senate, sources close to the transition confirmed.
NATIONAL
August 13, 2008 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Michael B. Mukasey said Tuesday that the Justice Department had no plans to bring criminal charges in connection with hiring abuses that took place under his predecessor, Alberto R. Gonzales. Mukasey said the findings in two recent reports by Inspector General Glenn A. Fine -- that a group of influential Gonzales aides considered politics and ideology in hiring career employees and summer interns -- were "disturbing. " The aides violated civil service laws and department regulations, Mukasey said, but they did not commit crimes that could send them to jail.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2008 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
Justice Department officials who prosecuted hundreds of illegal immigrants arrested at an Iowa meatpacking plant in May used a government-created manual to speed through guilty pleas, a potential violation of the rights of those detained in the raid, the American Civil Liberties Union said Thursday. The manual was assembled before the workers were arrested or their lawyers were appointed.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2008 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
When Bush administration officials at the Justice Department dismissed nine U.S. attorneys in 2006, there were various theories as to why the prosecutors were being let go. They were too soft on the death penalty. They did not prosecute enough illegal immigrants. They did not go after enough Democrats. On Monday, the Justice Department's internal watchdog hinted at perhaps the most sensational justification yet -- perceived homosexuality. In the second of a series of reports on the politically charged tenure of former Atty.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The Justice Department in 2002 told the CIA that its interrogators would be safe from prosecution for violations of anti-torture laws if they believed "in good faith" that harsh techniques used to break prisoners' will would not cause "prolonged mental harm."
NATIONAL
July 2, 2008 | From the Washington Post
More than 900 cases alleging that government contractors and drug makers have defrauded taxpayers are languishing in a backlog that has built up over the last decade because the Justice Department cannot keep pace with the charges brought by whistle-blowers, according to lawyers involved in the disputes. Many of the cases involve the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, rising healthcare payouts, and privatization of government functions -- all of which offer rich new opportunities to swindle taxpayers.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department sued Friday to recover millions of dollars spent through federal health care plans for treatment of alleged injuries from silicone breast implants. It asked that the money come out of a settlement fund for the thousands of women. The government asked the court to halt settlement payments to women who used Medicare or other federally funded health care programs under the settlement program until the federal government gets reimbursed for its costs. In a lawsuit filed in U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1997 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By Rosa's own words, there really was no difference between her experience as a battered wife and that of countless other abused women. Many times during her 11 years with her husband, the 40-year-old woman, who asked that her last name not be used, was beaten black, blue and bloody. She was called names, cursed at, told she would never make it on her own.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed President Bush's former chief political advisor, Karl Rove, to testify about whether the White House improperly meddled with the Justice Department. Accusations of politics influencing decisions at the department -- including the firing of nine U.S. attorneys in 2006 -- led to the resignation last year of Bush's attorney general, Alberto Gonzales. It's unclear if Rove will testify; the White House cites executive privilege.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera and Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writers
Yahoo Inc.'s short experiment with outsourcing some of its Web-search ads to Google Inc. has drawn scrutiny from antitrust regulators, the companies said Wednesday. Yahoo and Google said they had provided the Justice Department with unspecified information in response to questions about the two-week test, which was designed to explore how a possible collaboration could help Yahoo thwart Microsoft Corp.'s takeover bid. Microsoft is busy planning its next move in the buyout fight for Yahoo.
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