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TRAVEL
May 2, 1993 | LARRY HABEGGER and JAMES O'REILLY, Habegger and O'Reilly are San Francisco-based free-lance writers. and
Africa South Africa: Attacks against tourists occurred recently in the Transkei independent homeland. The resorts on Transkei's Wild Coast are popular holiday destinations for South African and foreign tourists. Two South Africans returning from a fishing trip were killed in an ambush near Port St. John on April 13 and two German tourists were attacked at the Coffee Bay Resort two days later. Armed police were sent to the area to provide protection. Transkei has been very tense in the wake of the killing of African National Congress official Chris Hani.
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NEWS
April 4, 2001 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Other than hearing that your policy has been canceled, it's about the worst news you can get from your auto insurer: Sorry, your vehicle has been "totaled." But if you loved that car or truck, totaled doesn't always have to be the death sentence that the term implies. A totaled vehicle isn't always a mangled mess. Sometimes it's salvageable. And even if it can't be saved--or you chose not to try--the settlement your insurer offers isn't necessarily the best you can do.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Nicholas Goldberg
A Saudi princess living in Irvine was charged Wednesday with human trafficking after a Kenyan woman who worked in her home fled and contacted the police. Orange County prosecutors allege that Meshael Alayban forced the woman to work 16 hours a day, seven days a week, for only $220 a month, despite initial promises of an eight-hour day and higher wages. Alayban kept the domestic worker's passport and documents so she was unable to leave. It's an ugly, troubling story, but it's a familiar one in Saudi Arabia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2012 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
Yi-Shen Chou has spent more than 30 years in the U.S., first as a motel operator and now as a Monterey Park retiree who enjoys line dancing and computer games. His family - a half-dozen brothers and sisters and numerous nieces and nephews - remains in Taiwan. Occasionally, Chou reunites with them on one side of the Pacific or the other, but for the most part, he is alone here. Chou, 71, may soon be able to see his relatives more often. Starting Thursday, Taiwanese citizens will no longer need a visa to visit the U.S., eliminating a cumbersome and expensive process that deterred some people from making the trip at a time when few Taiwanese are seeking to settle here permanently.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1985
Garry W. Pearson has been named a vice president in the finance and accounting department of Golden State Sanwa Bank, Los Angeles.
TRAVEL
December 14, 1986
The Department of State and the Internal Revenue Service are studying possible methods of sharing data under new regulations approved by Congress. One proposal is that when persons apply for a passport, new or renewal, the information will be sent on to the IRS. But the target date for any such changes in the rules is January, 1988, according to the Bureau of Consular Affairs for the Department of State, not January, 1987, as reported by Eric Friedheim last Sunday in the Travel Section.
OPINION
December 3, 1989 | JEREMY J. STONE, Jeremy J. Stone is president of the Federation of American Scientists.
Once upon a time, in Europe, Jews were being slaughtered. The United States was at war with the murderers, the government of Nazi Germany. As one might expect, the United States maintained that its policy was to work out programs to save those European Jews who could be saved. History now records that this was not true. On the contrary, during half the war the Department of State actually used the machinery of government to sabotage the rescue of Jews.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Mexico predicts record tourist visits this year. But it's not because of a surge in U.S. visitors. Don't get Mexico wrong. U.S. tourists still represent the lion's share of foreign visitors, and Mexico welcomes them and their green dollar bills. But Mexico is reaching out to visitors from countries such as Russia, Brazil, Peru and Colombia after fears of drug violence and the recession reduced U.S. visitor numbers. The effort seems to be paying off. Based on rising tourism numbers in the first half of the year, Mexican tourism officials predict the country will host 24.7 million foreign visitors in 2012, surpassing last year's record of 23.4 million.
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