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May 2, 1993 | LARRY HABEGGER and JAMES O'REILLY, Habegger and O'Reilly are San Francisco-based free-lance writers. and
Africa South Africa: Attacks against tourists occurred recently in the Transkei independent homeland. The resorts on Transkei's Wild Coast are popular holiday destinations for South African and foreign tourists. Two South Africans returning from a fishing trip were killed in an ambush near Port St. John on April 13 and two German tourists were attacked at the Coffee Bay Resort two days later. Armed police were sent to the area to provide protection. Transkei has been very tense in the wake of the killing of African National Congress official Chris Hani.
Other than hearing that your policy has been canceled, it's about the worst news you can get from your auto insurer: Sorry, your vehicle has been "totaled." But if you loved that car or truck, totaled doesn't always have to be the death sentence that the term implies. A totaled vehicle isn't always a mangled mess. Sometimes it's salvageable. And even if it can't be saved--or you chose not to try--the settlement your insurer offers isn't necessarily the best you can do.
December 15, 1991 | DIANA SHAW, Diana Shaw is a writer, and a researcher for the movie industry.
One night last spring I lay sleepless and sweltering in the dying city of Haiphong, North Viet Nam, asking myself the question that has taunted so many young Americans caught in faraway places: "What in the hell am I doing here?" . . . Out there, in the makeshift refugee camp I had set up with U.S. Army tents, were more than 12,000 wretched, sick and horribly maimed Vietnamese, most of them either very young or very old.
July 11, 2013 | By Nicholas Goldberg
A Saudi princess living in Irvine was charged Wednesday with human trafficking after a Kenyan woman who worked in her home fled and contacted the police. Orange County prosecutors allege that Meshael Alayban forced the woman to work 16 hours a day, seven days a week, for only $220 a month, despite initial promises of an eight-hour day and higher wages. Alayban kept the domestic worker's passport and documents so she was unable to leave. It's an ugly, troubling story, but it's a familiar one in Saudi Arabia.
John W. Atherton, who launched Pitzer College, the newest and perhaps most innovative of the Claremont Colleges, as its founding president from 1963 to 1970, has died. He was 85. Atherton, who spent most of his academic career teaching English, died Tuesday in Claremont, university officials announced.
October 17, 2002 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
UNITED NATIONS -- When President Bush chastises the U.N. for letting Iraq violate 16 Security Council resolutions, what he doesn't mention is that Iraq is not alone. Nearly 100 U.N. resolutions are being violated by other countries, and in many cases, a recent study notes, enforcement is being blocked by the United States or its allies.
August 16, 1985
Garry W. Pearson has been named a vice president in the finance and accounting department of Golden State Sanwa Bank, Los Angeles.
December 14, 1986
The Department of State and the Internal Revenue Service are studying possible methods of sharing data under new regulations approved by Congress. One proposal is that when persons apply for a passport, new or renewal, the information will be sent on to the IRS. But the target date for any such changes in the rules is January, 1988, according to the Bureau of Consular Affairs for the Department of State, not January, 1987, as reported by Eric Friedheim last Sunday in the Travel Section.
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