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OPINION
November 14, 2008
In the last few years, the number of illegal immigrants in detention who waived their right to plead their case to remain in the United States has shot up from 5,500 in 2004 to 35,000 this year. In all, nearly 100,000 people have agreed to leave the country under "stipulated removal. " Not surprisingly, troubling reports have surfaced of immigrants who say they were encouraged to self-deport without knowing that they had valid legal claims to remain in the U.S. and to have a hearing before a judge.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Comprehensive immigration reform is probably dead for yet another year, the victim - once again - of a dysfunctional Congress that can't even reach agreement on the things it agrees on. There is nothing President Obama can do about that, although if therapy were available for political relationships, there'd be a referral waiting to be made. In the meantime, the president still has to administer immigration laws as they exist, and he reportedly is considering dropping his opposition to bond hearings for detained undocumented immigrants.
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OPINION
March 25, 2014
Re "The face of deportation," Column, March 23 One cannot help being sympathetic to the plight of 10-year-old Jersey Vargas, who is going to Rome to appeal for papal intervention regarding her father's deportation. No one likes to hear of families being separated. But as Los Angeles Archbishop Jose Gomez says, "We have a reality we need to find a solution to: people are already here. " They are here for a better life. But why do they stay and raise families, from whom they might later be separated?
NATIONAL
April 19, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The request: Kick Justin Bieber out of the United States of America. The White House's response: No. In case you hadn't been paying close attention to Bieber's citizenship status lately -- and really, who is? -- someone launched a petition on the White House's website in January asking officials to deport the 20-year-old Canadian pop megastar after his arrest on suspicion of driving under the influence and resisting arrest in Miami Beach. "We would like to see the dangerous, reckless, destructive, and drug abusing, Justin Bieber deported and his green card revoked," read the plaintive prompt , which was mostly grammatical.
OPINION
April 3, 2014
Re "Who should be deported?," Opinion, March 27 It's most telling that John Sandweg, a former head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, excoriates the inhumanity of current ICE deportation policies. His piece should be required reading for all members of Congress who continue to dither over immigration reform. Sandweg's well-considered remarks bring to mind the hypocrisy of politicians comfortably ensconced in the pockets of big agriculture and big business. If ICE suddenly were to deport all undocumented immigrant workers, the howls from business and agricultural interests would be deafening.
OPINION
June 17, 2012
President Obama's announcement Friday that he will temporarily halt the deportation of some young students and veterans who are in this country illegally is a step that is in some respects worrisome - and yet one he's right to take. FOR THE RECORD: A previous version of the headline referred to a change in the Obama administration's deportation enforcement policy as an executive order. In fact, the policy change came as a directive from the Secretary of Homeland Security.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2012 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
Illegal immigrants who are arrested in minor crimes will no longer be targeted for deportation, the Obama administration announced Friday in an apparent concession to the increasing number of jurisdictions pushing back against its Secure Communities program. Immigrant advocates as well as some police chiefs and sheriffs have complained that detention orders under the program were being issued indiscriminately, snaring people who were driving without a license or selling tamales on private property.
OPINION
April 10, 2010
The Supreme Court has recognized what would be obvious to any layperson: A competent defense attorney must inform a client that a guilty plea might lead not only to prison time but to deportation from the country. The court last week ruled 7 to 2 for Jose Padilla, a legal resident from Honduras who was wrongly told by his lawyer that pleading guilty to a marijuana trafficking charge wouldn't change his immigration status because he'd been in the country for more than 40 years. In an opinion for himself and four colleagues, Justice John Paul Stevens said that "deportation is an integral part -- indeed sometimes the most important part -- of the penalty that may be imposed on noncitizen defendants who plead guilty to specific crimes."
OPINION
November 7, 2012
In March 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court concluded that a defendant's 6th Amendment right to counsel - and its implied right to effective counsel - is violated when defense lawyers fail to warn their noncitizen clients that a guilty plea to certain offenses carries a risk of deportation. Now the court must decide whether that ruling should be applied retroactively to people convicted before it was issued. Justice and the court's own precedents suggest that it should. The case before the court involves Roselva Chaidez, a Mexican immigrant who had been living legally in Chicago with her children and grandchildren.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2009 | Anna Gorman
Veronica Lopez called her grown children in Los Angeles in early February to say goodbye. She had spent nine months in immigration detention and was scheduled for deportation to Guatemala. Lopez felt scared. Her abusive ex-husband had already been deported and she was worried he would track her down. She had applied for a special visa for undocumented crime victims who cooperate with police, but a decision hadn't been made.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Obama administration officials are considering allowing bond hearings for immigrants in prolonged detention, officials said, a shift that could slow the pace of deportations because immigration courts expedite cases of incarcerated immigrants. Several thousand immigrants could be released from jails across the country if judges are allowed to hear their cases and grant bond, advocates say. The proposal is one of several being floated as the White House scrambles to ease the concerns of Latino groups and other traditional allies that have turned on President Obama in recent weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A 19-year-old Northern California girl who was convicted of selling pot brownies to buy a prom dress now faces deportation. Saira Munoz of Yuba City was an 18-year-old senior at River Valley High School when prosecutors say she hired a friend to sell her marijuana-laced brownies. She was caught after a student got sick off one of the brownies. She was convicted of a felony and sentenced to four years of formal probation and nine days in jail with credit for time served, the Sacramento Bee reported . That felony conviction, in turn, put her residency status in jeopardy after the Sutter County Probation Department informed the federal government about her conviction.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Lisa Mascaro, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON - After meeting with Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, leaders of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus voiced confidence Wednesday that if the Republican-led House fails to undertake immigration reform this year, the administration will act by executive action. Last month, President Obama promised Latino leaders that his administration would review its deportation policy and enforce laws "more humanely. " Under Obama, deportations hit the 2-million mark, often separating families.
OPINION
April 3, 2014
Re "Who should be deported?," Opinion, March 27 It's most telling that John Sandweg, a former head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, excoriates the inhumanity of current ICE deportation policies. His piece should be required reading for all members of Congress who continue to dither over immigration reform. Sandweg's well-considered remarks bring to mind the hypocrisy of politicians comfortably ensconced in the pockets of big agriculture and big business. If ICE suddenly were to deport all undocumented immigrant workers, the howls from business and agricultural interests would be deafening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The state Senate on Thursday approved a bill that would reduce the maximum possible misdemeanor sentence from one year to 364 days,  to reduce deportations of legal residents for minor crimes. The bill addresses concern that federal law allows legal immigrants to be deported if they are convicted of a crime and given a one-year sentence. Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) said his bill would prevent families from being torn apart if one member commits a crime that is not a felony, such as writing a bad check.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Scott Gold
Community activists pledged Monday to continue fighting the construction of an immigrant processing center on the Central Coast, despite a bitterly contested vote in which a local city council advanced the project in the face of fervent public opposition. "The fight is not over," said Hazel Davalos, head of the Santa Maria chapter of Coastal Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy, an organization that helps working families in the region. The federal government wants to replace an aging, dilapidated facility in Lompoc - a smattering of trailers that were installed on the grounds of a prison to process immigration cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Immigrant activists met with members of Gov. Jerry Brown's office on Wednesday as they continued pushing for legislation aimed at reducing deportations. One of the activists said the meeting went well, but the staff members would not pledge Brown's support for the current version of the legislation, known as the Trust Act. Neidi Dominguez of the California Immigrant Youth Justice Alliance said she still wants to sit down with Brown directly. “He needs to meet with the people affected," she said.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A Miami high school valedictorian who gained national attention with her fight to avoid deportation back to Colombia has been granted a two-year reprieve by federal authorities who now say that their bigger goal is going after illegal immigrants who are criminals -- and not dutiful students. Daniela Pelaez, and her sister, Dayana, were ordered to leave the country just last week by a federal immigration judge. But U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Tuesday issued a statement saying the agency would defer carrying out the court order for at least two years.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By John Sandweg
President Obama recently directed Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson to examine U.S. immigration enforcement policies to see how the department can "conduct enforcement more humanely within the confines of the law. " The answer to the president's directive is surprisingly simple: Homeland Security's Immigration and Customs Enforcement division, known as ICE, should eliminate "non-criminal re-entrants and immigration fugitives" as a priority...
OPINION
March 25, 2014
Re "The face of deportation," Column, March 23 One cannot help being sympathetic to the plight of 10-year-old Jersey Vargas, who is going to Rome to appeal for papal intervention regarding her father's deportation. No one likes to hear of families being separated. But as Los Angeles Archbishop Jose Gomez says, "We have a reality we need to find a solution to: people are already here. " They are here for a better life. But why do they stay and raise families, from whom they might later be separated?
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