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WORLD
April 24, 2011 | By Allyn Gaestel, Los Angeles Times
Dumped in a squalid holding cell and then shunned by a society he doesn't know, Patrick Escarment struggles to learn Creole and build a life in earthquake-devastated Haiti. His arrival here this year was not voluntary. Escarment was in the first group of Haitians with criminal records to be deported from the United States to Haiti after a one-year moratorium. After the Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake that destroyed most of this capital and killed more than 300,000 people, the Obama administration suspended deportations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2000 | MEGAN GARVEY and H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The family of a Los Angeles man shot and killed early Saturday by California Highway Patrol officers said fear of being deported may have led the 25-year-old El Salvador native to flee when police tried to pull him over for running a stoplight. Jose Daniel Gonzalez, 25, was shot multiple times by CHP officers who had cornered him on a dead-end street in North Tustin after Gonzalez led them on an hourlong high-speed chase that began not far from his home in South Central Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
The Obama administration will review immigration cases in Baltimore and Denver with an eye toward freezing deportations of illegal residents who have no criminal records and expanding the program nationwide. The elderly, children who have been in the country more than five years, students who came to the U.S. under the age of 16 and are enrolled in a college degree program, and victims of domestic violence are among those whose deportations could be put on hold under the test program, which begins Dec. 4 and could be broadened in January.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lilliam Portillo came to America in 1985, when she was just 17 and both her Nicaraguan homeland and her future were clouded with gun smoke. The Sandinista government was embroiled in a bloody civil war with the U.S.-backed Contras, and much of Central America was in turmoil. Along with tens of thousands of her compatriots, Portillo was welcomed as a refugee by the Ronald Reagan administration, and she settled into Miami's thriving Nicaraguan community.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Obama administration officials are considering allowing bond hearings for immigrants in prolonged detention, officials said, a shift that could slow the pace of deportations because immigration courts expedite cases of incarcerated immigrants. Several thousand immigrants could be released from jails across the country if judges are allowed to hear their cases and grant bond, advocates say. The proposal is one of several being floated as the White House scrambles to ease the concerns of Latino groups and other traditional allies that have turned on President Obama in recent weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
SAN FRANCISCO - The UC regents Thursday confirmed U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano as the next president of the 10-campus system during a meeting interrupted by protesters who contended that she should be disqualified because her agency expanded deportations of people who entered the country illegally. The regents set Napolitano's base salary at $570,000 a year, which at her request is $21,000 less than the pay for current UC President Mark G. Yudof. That avoids a political furor about executive pay inflation, but it still will be a big raise from Napolitano's annual Cabinet salary of about $200,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2012 | By Christopher Goffard, Esmeralda Bermudez and Melissa Leu, Los Angeles Times
For Julio Salgado and many others, the limbo of being an illegal immigrant - the fear of deportation, the hiding in plain sight, the uncertainties of the underground economy - appeared to vanish abruptly Friday. "We can exist now in the eyes of the country," said Salgado, 28, a Berkeley artist who got a degree from Cal State Long Beach two years ago but said his status as an undocumented immigrant has forced him to scrape together off-the-books jobs as an illustrator and fast-food worker.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge handed the Justice Department another major setback Monday in its decade-long campaign to deport a group of Southern California immigrants, who the government says have ties to Palestinian terrorists. U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson rejected the Justice Department's contention that he should dismiss a major civil rights case filed by the immigrants, seven Palestinians and a Kenyan known as "the L.A. 8."
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Israeli Agriculture Minister Rafael Eitan politician called for severe punishment, including widespread house demolitions and deportations, for residents of Bureij refugee camp in the occupied Gaza Strip, where Palestinians killed an Israeli reserve soldier. Bureij has been under curfew since the Thursday incident.
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