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Deposit Laws

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Just over 8.5 billion recyclable cans were sold in California last year. The number redeemed for a nickel under California's recycling law: 8.3 billion. That's a return rate of nearly 100%. That kind of success isn't just impressive, it's unbelievable. But the recycling rate for certain plastic containers was even higher: 104%. California's generous recycling redemption program has led to rampant fraud. Crafty entrepreneurs are driving semi-trailers full of cans from Nevada or Arizona, which don't have deposit laws, across the border and transforming their cargo into truckfuls of nickels.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Just over 8.5 billion recyclable cans were sold in California last year. The number redeemed for a nickel under California's recycling law: 8.3 billion. That's a return rate of nearly 100%. That kind of success isn't just impressive, it's unbelievable. But the recycling rate for certain plastic containers was even higher: 104%. California's generous recycling redemption program has led to rampant fraud. Crafty entrepreneurs are driving semi-trailers full of cans from Nevada or Arizona, which don't have deposit laws, across the border and transforming their cargo into truckfuls of nickels.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1985
Litter is a major problem on California's beaches, roads and parks. The bottle bill, AB 2020, would help keep them clean by requiring a nickel deposit on soda, beer, wine and liquor bottles sold after next June 1. The deposit would be a 5-cent incentive to encourage consumers to return glass and plastic beverage containers rather than toss the empties and throw away money. It has worked in nine states--including Oregon, New York and Massachusetts.
REAL ESTATE
March 28, 2004 | By Project Sentinel
Question: I own a duplex. I live in one side and rent out the other. Do the new requirements on handling deductions from a security deposit apply to me? Answer: The changes to Civil Code 1950.5, which went into effect Jan. 1, apply to all rental properties regardless of size. The changes affect what documentation must be provided to a tenant when the deductions from a deposit exceed $125.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1988 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
All he wanted to do was to park his long white recycling bins in the parking lots of neighborhood supermarkets. But for John Griffin, Southern California manager for Reynolds Aluminum Recycling, the mandates of the new California recycling law ran head-on into a raft of local zoning restrictions. Some cities wanted him to enclose the bins within block walls; others wanted him to install landscaping. Some asked for architectural plans or traffic studies. A few told him no way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley on Thursday told Bureau of Sanitation officials not to put any trash separated for recycling into landfills, after at least one city contractor said some glass may have to be dumped because the market cannot accept all of the glass being generated in the city's pilot recycling program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1988 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
The struggling recycling industry in California will soon feature the same approach that has worked for the state lottery--cash prizes. Beginning Monday, one of the largest recyclers of aluminum cans will be dispensing tokens from its can machines worth cash prizes of $2 to $100 at supermarket recycling centers throughout the state. The promotion by Virginia-based Environmental Products Corp.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top-level law enforcement official disclosed Friday that two feuding state officials have separately asked for investigations of payments made to businesses they suspect of defrauding the California beverage container recycling program. Whitt Murray, acting chief of the Department of Justice's bureau of investigations, said the investigations of suspected fraud by recyclers were requested by state Controller Gray Davis and Director of Conservation Randall M. Ward.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge has prevented the state from imposing a new fee on glass beverage containers under California's recycling law. The fee was imposed by the state Division of Recycling on the makers of glass bottles, at the rate of a small fraction of a penny per bottle. It was to have gone into effect Monday. The division contended that the reason for the fee was that the price of recycled glass had fallen so low that it would no longer support the cost of collection and processing.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | JEAN MERL, Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists scored a big victory Thursday when the state Senate voted overwhelmingly to add wine cooler bottles to California's beverage container recycling law. The Senate's 30-1 vote on a bill by Assemblyman Byron D. Sher (D-Palo Alto) signaled an end to the wine industry opposition that had won an exemption for wine cooler bottles when the recycling law took effect last year. Before going to Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2000 | BOBBY CUZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vigilant consumers who make a habit of studying their sales receipts may have recently noticed a few extra pennies tacked on to the prices of their Snapple, Arrowhead or Frappuccino bottles. It's not a cashier's mistake. It's the California redemption value, or CRV, a refundable deposit that Californians have been paying for years on beer, soft-drink and wine-cooler containers, whether they realized it or not. Now, because of legislation that took effect Jan.
NEWS
July 26, 1999 | MARK GLADSTONE and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Trying to protect their products from new recycling requirements, powerful food conglomerates are spending up to $800,000 to lobby Gov. Gray Davis and others against expanding California's landmark bottle law.
REAL ESTATE
February 1, 1998 | KEVIN POSTEMA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
QUESTION: I live in a rental house in Sherman Oaks. I've been told that there is a law that states that a landlord must keep a tenant's security deposit in an interest-bearing account. This money must then be returned to the tenant when the lease is up, they tell me. Is it true? ANSWER: The city of Los Angeles, which includes Sherman Oaks, has a law requiring owners of rent-controlled rental properties in the city to pay renters 5% simple interest on their security deposits.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge has prevented the state from imposing a new fee on glass beverage containers under California's recycling law. The fee was imposed by the state Division of Recycling on the makers of glass bottles, at the rate of a small fraction of a penny per bottle. It was to have gone into effect Monday. The division contended that the reason for the fee was that the price of recycled glass had fallen so low that it would no longer support the cost of collection and processing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley on Thursday told Bureau of Sanitation officials not to put any trash separated for recycling into landfills, after at least one city contractor said some glass may have to be dumped because the market cannot accept all of the glass being generated in the city's pilot recycling program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1990 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though the city of Los Angeles' household trash recycling program is only in a limited test phase, recyclers are already reporting difficulty in finding markets for much of the material. And at least one city contractor said that unless a solution is found within the next several weeks, 1,000 tons of glass that has been carefully separated by homeowners and collected for recycling could be sent to landfills.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top-level law enforcement official disclosed Friday that two feuding state officials have separately asked for investigations of payments made to businesses they suspect of defrauding the California beverage container recycling program. Whitt Murray, acting chief of the Department of Justice's bureau of investigations, said the investigations of suspected fraud by recyclers were requested by state Controller Gray Davis and Director of Conservation Randall M. Ward.
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