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Deputy Brian Scanlan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995
I can't believe how disgraceful the shooting affair involving former Orange County Sheriff's Deputy Brian Scanlan is. Deputy Scanlan, through what the district attorney's office called negligence, shoots and kills Deputy Darryn Robins. Not only does Scanlan waltz away without an involuntary manslaughter charge, but we taxpayers have to pay $2,100 a month in service-related disability retirement. And you wonder why Orange County is bankrupt. GREG HILL Huntington Beach
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995
I can't believe how disgraceful the shooting affair involving former Orange County Sheriff's Deputy Brian Scanlan is. Deputy Scanlan, through what the district attorney's office called negligence, shoots and kills Deputy Darryn Robins. Not only does Scanlan waltz away without an involuntary manslaughter charge, but we taxpayers have to pay $2,100 a month in service-related disability retirement. And you wonder why Orange County is bankrupt. GREG HILL Huntington Beach
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1995
I am writing concerning the decision to grant a service-connected disability to (Orange County Sheriff's) Deputy Brian Scanlan. I am in total disagreement with the decision to grant an early retirement to a deputy who by all standards failed to properly respond during a training exercise. To reward this individual with an early disability retirement, which not only rewards his incompetence but places the burden of paying his taxes upon the remainder of the productive citizens, is irresponsible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1995
I am writing concerning the decision to grant a service-connected disability to (Orange County Sheriff's) Deputy Brian Scanlan. I am in total disagreement with the decision to grant an early retirement to a deputy who by all standards failed to properly respond during a training exercise. To reward this individual with an early disability retirement, which not only rewards his incompetence but places the burden of paying his taxes upon the remainder of the productive citizens, is irresponsible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1994
Well! What do you know? We have had another sappy decision a la Rodney King. This time by the Orange County Grand Jury. It smells. The killing is not excusable. It is not a close call as stated by the county prosecutor. Officer (Brian) Scanlan is trained in the use of firearms. He must have learned as a private in the Army, as I did, that you: 1. Never point a gun at another person (unless you intend to kill) and 2. You never assume that a gun in your hand is not loaded. Again, al la King, we are told that we cannot know how the jury arrived at its decision without seeing or hearing the evidence presented to it. Baloney!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1994
In reference to the recent articles (Dec. 29 and Dec. 30) about Orange County Sheriff's Deputy Brian Scanlan, I was disheartened to read that The Times had resorted to a tabloid-like character crucifixion of this deputy. For whatever reason, The Times felt the need to attack Scanlan's character by disclosing that he had failed to meet past child-care payments and had an outstanding equipment violation ticket. The Times also discussed pending litigation involving Scanlan as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1994
The information published about the sheriff's and district attorney's offices' investigation(s) of the Deputy Brian Scanlan shooting upsets me ("Why Secrecy in Shooting Probe," Platform, April 1). Although it does not appear that Deputy Scanlan intended the death of Deputy Darryn Robins, it does appear that he acted without caution and he certainly violated department training policy by using a loaded weapon. It has been noted that Deputy Robins' concealed weapon was unloaded.
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates was on his way to his mother-in-law's home to spend the Christmas holiday when a phone call brought tragic news. Deputy Darryn Leroy Robins, 30, had been shot in the head by a fellow deputy when an impromptu training session went terribly awry. Robins' condition looked grim. Gates said he rushed to the officer's hospital bedside, but was too late.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a sheriff's deputy who was shot in the face and killed by his partner in 1993 has agreed to accept $900,000 to settle a wrongful death lawsuit against Orange County, lawyers in the case said Friday. Deputy Darryn Leroy Robins was 30 when he was killed during a Christmas Day training exercise in which he was showing fellow Deputy Brian Scanlan how to guard against gang members who hide handguns in their cars, sheriff's reports said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1994 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Orange County Human Relations Commission agreed Thursday night to monitor the investigation into the Christmas Day shooting death of Sheriff's Deputy Darryn Leroy Robins by another deputy. While commission members took no formal action, they said they will remain in close contact with law enforcement officials and black community leaders who have concerns about the investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1994
The information published about the sheriff's and district attorney's offices' investigation(s) of the Deputy Brian Scanlan shooting upsets me ("Why Secrecy in Shooting Probe," Platform, April 1). Although it does not appear that Deputy Scanlan intended the death of Deputy Darryn Robins, it does appear that he acted without caution and he certainly violated department training policy by using a loaded weapon. It has been noted that Deputy Robins' concealed weapon was unloaded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1994
Well! What do you know? We have had another sappy decision a la Rodney King. This time by the Orange County Grand Jury. It smells. The killing is not excusable. It is not a close call as stated by the county prosecutor. Officer (Brian) Scanlan is trained in the use of firearms. He must have learned as a private in the Army, as I did, that you: 1. Never point a gun at another person (unless you intend to kill) and 2. You never assume that a gun in your hand is not loaded. Again, al la King, we are told that we cannot know how the jury arrived at its decision without seeing or hearing the evidence presented to it. Baloney!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1994
In reference to the recent articles (Dec. 29 and Dec. 30) about Orange County Sheriff's Deputy Brian Scanlan, I was disheartened to read that The Times had resorted to a tabloid-like character crucifixion of this deputy. For whatever reason, The Times felt the need to attack Scanlan's character by disclosing that he had failed to meet past child-care payments and had an outstanding equipment violation ticket. The Times also discussed pending litigation involving Scanlan as well.
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates was on his way to his mother-in-law's home to spend the Christmas holiday when a phone call brought tragic news. Deputy Darryn Leroy Robins, 30, had been shot in the head by a fellow deputy when an impromptu training session went terribly awry. Robins' condition looked grim. Gates said he rushed to the officer's hospital bedside, but was too late.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1998 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a sheriff's deputy who was shot in the face and killed by his partner in 1993 has agreed to accept $900,000 to settle a wrongful death lawsuit against the county, lawyers in the case said Friday. Deputy Darryn Leroy Robins was 30 when he was killed during a training exercise on Christmas Day 1993. Sheriff's reports said Robins was showing fellow Deputy Brian Scanlan how to guard against gang members who hide handguns in their cars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1994 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prayers for truth and justice were combined Tuesday night with calls for peace and community healing as about 50 people gathered for a candlelight vigil in honor of Sheriff's Deputy Darryn Robins, who was shot and killed one month ago by another officer during an impromptu training session. The vigil was organized by a coalition of Orange County African American leaders and was held in the mall alleyway where Robins was killed on Christmas Day.
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