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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1986
Gabriela Benackova will sing the role of Desdemona at the final performance of Los Angeles Music Center Opera's production of "Otello" Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The Czech soprano, who is replacing the ailing Daniela Dessi, was released from a rehearsal commitment at Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, where she will sing the title role in a new production of "Jenufa" next month.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
What a difference a Desdemona makes. Los Angeles Opera's new production of Verdi's "Otello" opened Saturday night in trouble. James Conlon's conducting was vigorous; the orchestra and chorus sounded good. But the evening proved weak theatrically and scenically, and the singers were disappointing. Making matters worse, the Chilean soprano Cristina Gallardo-Domas became ill at the time of the dress rehearsal. Elena Evseeva flew in from New York on the day of the performance to replace her.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1986
Gabriela Benackova will sing the role of Desdemona opposite Placido Domingo in Music Center Opera's season-opening production of Verdi's "Otello" tonight and Friday. The Czech soprano is replacing Daniela Dessi, who reportedly collapsed at the Milan, Italy, airport last week.
OPINION
May 31, 2005 | David P. Barash and Nanelle R. Barash, David P. Barash, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, Seattle, and Nanelle R. Barash, an undergraduate at Swarthmore College, are co-authors of "Madame Bovary's Ovaries: A Darwinian Look at Literature" (Delacorte, 2005).
The literary critic Harold Bloom once wrote that Shakespeare "invented the human." But that's not true, of course. Evolution did. Homo sapiens, like all other living things, is a biological critter, a product of evolution by natural selection.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1986
Italian soprano Daniela Dessi has canceled her appearances as Desdemona in Los Angeles Music Center Opera's production of Verdi's "Otello," which opens the company's inaugural season next week at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. According to John Howlett, director of public affairs at MCO, Dessi collapsed at the airport in Milan Friday morning and was taken to a local hospital. Howlett could provide no other details of her condition, nor would he speculate on a successor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986
Regarding director Franco Zeffirelli's passionate defense of his most recent opus (Calendar Letters, Oct. 12): I am a musician. I also happen to love film. And I far from loved "Otello." In his review Sept. 19, music critic Martin Bernheimer justifiably cited many of the film's musical flaws. I should like to address myself to what I regard as some serious lapses of directorial taste that frequently reduced "Otello" to the level of grade-B cinema, or worse, to the obviousness of most TV movies: The regulation of singers' voices to an echo-chamber during flashbacks, to dispel any doubt that the accompanying scene was a memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Shakespeare's "Othello," the women--well, Desdemona--don't make out very well. In the Orange County Crazies' new Saturday night show, "Orangethello," the women seem to be exacting some revenge. If this group--which is, after all, led by a woman (Cherie Kerr)--has been struggling for its own brand of gender equity, then the struggle is more or less over.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
C. Bernard Jackson's "Iago," in LATC's Theatre 3, gives a radically revisionistic slant to Shakespeare's "Othello." A revival of the 1979 Inner City Cultural Center production, "Iago" could best be described as a "What If?" play. What if Iago were not a scheming dastard after all, but a much-maligned victim of racism and internecine politics? In Jackson's version, Iago (J.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
When artistic directors resign in Germany, they really resign. Peter Zadek has just left his post as director of the Hamburg City Theatre with the recommendation that the theater might just as well "be turned into a brothel." Marl Heinrich of the Associated Press reports that Zadek left his post after only 18 months, declaring himself fed up with know-it-all reviewers and a know-nothing audience. Zadek opened with a hit, "Ghetto," but since then has had no luck with the Hamburg press and public.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1996 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kallen Esperian isn't one to drop names. But she could. A winner of the 1985 Opera Company of Philadelphia/Luciano Pavarotti Voice Competition, the soprano has since sung regularly in major opera houses with the Great One himself, as well as with his colleague-competitor Placido Domingo and recently also with Jose Carreras. Bingo, all three tenorissimos.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
Authoritative, solid and persuasive, Edoardo Muller's achievements as a pit conductor are not limited to the 14 operas he has previously presided over at San Diego Opera, or to his many international credits. Yet he added considerably to his already enviable reputation in taking on, for his 15th San Diego assignment, the complex and daunting challenge of Giuseppe Verdi's penultimate masterpiece, "Otello," this month in Civic Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
C. Bernard Jackson's "Iago," in LATC's Theatre 3, gives a radically revisionistic slant to Shakespeare's "Othello." A revival of the 1979 Inner City Cultural Center production, "Iago" could best be described as a "What If?" play. What if Iago were not a scheming dastard after all, but a much-maligned victim of racism and internecine politics? In Jackson's version, Iago (J.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1996 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The opera presented by the mighty Metropolitan on PBS tonight at 8 is Verdi's "Otello." The gentleman in the treacherous title role is very famous and, within his natural limitations, very good. But in this instance, the vehicle should have been called "Desdemona." It isn't that Renee Fleming, the wifely soprano in question, outclasses her vaunted partner, Placido Domingo. It's just that Fleming is virtually perfect in a part that could have been written with her specific gifts in mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1996 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kallen Esperian isn't one to drop names. But she could. A winner of the 1985 Opera Company of Philadelphia/Luciano Pavarotti Voice Competition, the soprano has since sung regularly in major opera houses with the Great One himself, as well as with his colleague-competitor Placido Domingo and recently also with Jose Carreras. Bingo, all three tenorissimos.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Shakespeare's "Othello," the women--well, Desdemona--don't make out very well. In the Orange County Crazies' new Saturday night show, "Orangethello," the women seem to be exacting some revenge. If this group--which is, after all, led by a woman (Cherie Kerr)--has been struggling for its own brand of gender equity, then the struggle is more or less over.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
When artistic directors resign in Germany, they really resign. Peter Zadek has just left his post as director of the Hamburg City Theatre with the recommendation that the theater might just as well "be turned into a brothel." Marl Heinrich of the Associated Press reports that Zadek left his post after only 18 months, declaring himself fed up with know-it-all reviewers and a know-nothing audience. Zadek opened with a hit, "Ghetto," but since then has had no luck with the Hamburg press and public.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1996 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The opera presented by the mighty Metropolitan on PBS tonight at 8 is Verdi's "Otello." The gentleman in the treacherous title role is very famous and, within his natural limitations, very good. But in this instance, the vehicle should have been called "Desdemona." It isn't that Renee Fleming, the wifely soprano in question, outclasses her vaunted partner, Placido Domingo. It's just that Fleming is virtually perfect in a part that could have been written with her specific gifts in mind.
OPINION
May 31, 2005 | David P. Barash and Nanelle R. Barash, David P. Barash, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, Seattle, and Nanelle R. Barash, an undergraduate at Swarthmore College, are co-authors of "Madame Bovary's Ovaries: A Darwinian Look at Literature" (Delacorte, 2005).
The literary critic Harold Bloom once wrote that Shakespeare "invented the human." But that's not true, of course. Evolution did. Homo sapiens, like all other living things, is a biological critter, a product of evolution by natural selection.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986
Regarding director Franco Zeffirelli's passionate defense of his most recent opus (Calendar Letters, Oct. 12): I am a musician. I also happen to love film. And I far from loved "Otello." In his review Sept. 19, music critic Martin Bernheimer justifiably cited many of the film's musical flaws. I should like to address myself to what I regard as some serious lapses of directorial taste that frequently reduced "Otello" to the level of grade-B cinema, or worse, to the obviousness of most TV movies: The regulation of singers' voices to an echo-chamber during flashbacks, to dispel any doubt that the accompanying scene was a memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1986
Gabriela Benackova will sing the role of Desdemona at the final performance of Los Angeles Music Center Opera's production of "Otello" Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The Czech soprano, who is replacing the ailing Daniela Dessi, was released from a rehearsal commitment at Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, where she will sing the title role in a new production of "Jenufa" next month.
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