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OPINION
August 20, 2003
Re "Wasting Water Pours Our Future Down the Drain," Voices, Aug. 16: Yes, let's conserve water so we can pack more people into Southern California. Many of us used to hope that water, or the lack of it, would limit the population. Ha! Just steal more from somewhere else. I say water everything and water it all the time, or the zealous water vigilantes will have us using water only to drink. Humans only, oh boy. Water is in a cycle. Our water evaporates and heads east, where it waters trees and returns via the Colorado River or through the ground -- that's the "no-brainer" that Henry Schlinger condescendingly refers to. The problem isn't "wasting" water; rather, it's expecting ever-increasing population growth to be sustainable.
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OPINION
August 20, 2003
Re "Wasting Water Pours Our Future Down the Drain," Voices, Aug. 16: Yes, let's conserve water so we can pack more people into Southern California. Many of us used to hope that water, or the lack of it, would limit the population. Ha! Just steal more from somewhere else. I say water everything and water it all the time, or the zealous water vigilantes will have us using water only to drink. Humans only, oh boy. Water is in a cycle. Our water evaporates and heads east, where it waters trees and returns via the Colorado River or through the ground -- that's the "no-brainer" that Henry Schlinger condescendingly refers to. The problem isn't "wasting" water; rather, it's expecting ever-increasing population growth to be sustainable.
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NEWS
June 27, 1985 | Associated Press
Mexico loses 988,000 acres of forest a year, and only 5% of its original tropical forests remain, a Mexican official told an international forestry meeting here this week. Noe Garza Flores, director of the National Commission on Arid Zones, warned that if the country does not take the necessary steps, two-thirds of its land could become desert within 20 years. Overgrazing is one of the main causes of desertification in Mexico, he added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Environmentalists have argued that the Sahara Desert, the world's largest, has been steadily increasing its size southward as a result of drought and land mismanagement, particularly overgrazing, increased cultivation and firewood cutting. But evidence of the extent of this process, called desertification, has been largely anecdotal. Researchers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
NEWS
July 10, 1985
International organizations offered $8 billion over the next five years to try to halt the destruction of tropical forests in the Third World. John Spears, forestry adviser for the World Bank, told representatives of 96 nations attending the 9th World Forestry Congress, in Mexico City, that desertification affects more than 2 billion people and threatens "a universal disaster." Twenty organizations agreed to form a study group, and international funding for forestry programs will double.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1998
Journalist William Shawcross coined the apt term "compassion fatigue" to describe the feeling of powerlessness that afflicts many of us when we hear the latest grim statistics about world poverty, like the recent UNICEF report that a record 7 million children die of malnutrition each year. This week, however, the Senate should be anything but powerless.
OPINION
April 16, 2007
Re "To the moon, Congress," Opinion, April 11 Our problems are not competition with China for control of outer space; our problems are right here before us on Earth: overpopulation, global warming, poisoning of our biosphere, land erosion and the loss of topsoils, desertification, extinction of species, disposal of nuclear wastes, competition for natural resources and poverty. What good is a colony out in space when our mother ship is in distress? ALTON L. SAFFORD Wrightwood, Calif.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | ANIS AHMED, REUTERS
Overcrowded and poverty-stricken Bangladesh, a prey to frequent natural disasters, may eventually lose half its habitable land to desert, environmental experts warn. "We are facing a threat of desertification through much of the country's northern areas," said Abdul Mukit Khan, a senior forestry official. "There is no denying this. We are already in for trouble," he said in a recent interview.
OPINION
June 14, 1987
Your headline (Editorial Pages, June 3), "World's Population Bomb May Be a Dud," and Ben Wattenberg's article under it are both cockeyed. The population bomb wasn't a dud. It has already exploded. Wattenberg missed it. But then it's hard to hear with your head buried in the sand. Wattenberg casually dismisses the United Nations world population projection from 5 billion people to 10 billion by the middle of the next century as ho-hum. That is population explosion. But the issue is not numbers of human beings.
OPINION
March 1, 1992 | Tom Wolf, Tom Wolf is writing a book about Colorado's Sangre de Cristo Mountains
The Desert Protection Act is a classic example of U.S. environmental politics gone wrong. It has something for virtually every interest group and entrepreneur, whether public or private. The problem is that the legislation offers little or no hope for bringing life back to the desert. Indeed, the Southern California desert it seeks to protect is functionally dead, "desertified," if you will. The act, sponsored by Sen.
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