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NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Carren Jao
“Warm” and “delicate” are not adjectives commonly associated with concrete, but new lighting and tables from the Los Angeles design studio Wrk-shp ask you to reconsider. Ryan Upton and Airi Isoda, the designers behind Wrk-shp, recently launched their Cylinder Series, a three-piece collection that uses concrete on a more intimate scale. “People think it will be really heavy, but at this scale, concrete is quite light,” said Isoda, who had used cast concrete in her jewelry line.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Ferdinand Alexander Porsche, who designed the first 911 sports car and went on to found a consumer products design firm that also carried the Porsche name, died Thursday in Salzburg, Austria. He was 76. Born Dec. 11, 1935, in Stuttgart, Germany, he was the eldest son of Dorothea and Ferry Porsche, who along with Ferry's father Ferdinand Porsche founded the business that grew into the sports car maker. Porsche grew up in the auto business during a turbulent time. His grandfather designed the original Volkswagen Beetle for the Nazi regime in Germany in the 1930s as well as tanks that were used by the Germans in World War II. As a child, "Butzi" - as he was known to his family and business associates - enjoyed designing and building his own toys.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
Sick of looking at that bulky Brita water filter pitcher? And of making way for it in the fridge? Here's a much more stylish, slimmer version designed by Erik Magnussen . Call it Danish minimalist. It holds 48.5 ounces and is compatible with filters from several companies, including the Brita Maxtra Filter. Available in smoke (as pictured), azur (cobalt) and aqua (turquoise) from the online shop steltonusa.com for $50. ALSO: The Early Bird gets the chilaquiles Coming to the Taste: the Beer Chicks In the nick of time: a lime meringue tart from David Lebovitz   twitter.com/sirenevirbila
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Show houses are meant to provide inspiration and to reflect the latest trends, and the Pasadena Showcase House of Design opens Sunday with plenty of both. This year 28 designers transformed a 1941 Arcadia estate originally designed by Roland E. Coate Sr., adding color and texture that exude warmth while staying true to the home's Monterey Colonial style. In a long second-floor hallway, purple damask fabric applied to the wall in lieu of wallpaper adds an unexpected softness. Grass cloth and burlap appear on other walls, often used as backing for bookshelves.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By David A. Keeps
For those who take decorating their outdoor rooms as seriously as their interiors, Niche has long been a resource for big-ticket European designs. The store, which represents the work of Milan-based Italian designers Patricia Urquiola, Paola Lenti and Rodolpho Dordoni, recently moved to an indoor-outdoor space at 8770 Beverly Blvd. Now Niche owner and designer Robina Benson is discounting all the merchandise at her former location with savings by 25% to 60% in a sale that starts Monday morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Standing atop a patch of churned-up dirt on a recent morning, James Corner was surrounded by mismatched palm trees, chipped sidewalks and sagging chain link: a typical slice of Southern California landscape caught unawares, hardly ready for its close-up. He and I had just walked onto the site of a new pair of connected parks in Santa Monica that his New York-based landscape architecture and urban-design firm, James Corner Field Operations, is creating. Three towering ficus trees, sitting in giant temporary planter boxes and waiting to be relocated, added some scale, but otherwise the area was bare.
HOME & GARDEN
January 23, 2010
When landscape designer Dan Pearson gave a talk in Seattle a few years ago, he wasn't interested in touring local gardens while in town. Instead, he asked his hosts to arrange a visit to Mt. St. Helens. "The whole power of nature was never more clearly seen," he recently recalled, speaking by telephone from Dan Pearson Studio in London. In creating landscapes, residential or public, the designer said he wants to understand the natural context of places -- an approach outlined in his new book, "Spirit: Garden Inspiration," and in a lecture scheduled for Tuesday at Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills, a benefit for the Garden Conservancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2009 | T. Rees Shapiro
Richard Whitcomb, a mechanical engineer who changed the way we fly today with three design innovations that made airplanes fly farther and faster using less fuel, has died. He was 88. Whitcomb died of pneumonia Tuesday in Newport News, Va. His contributions, for which he won the most prestigious prize in aviation, focused on a plane's efficiency cutting through air at speeds approaching the sound barrier, or the "transonic region." As airplanes approach the speed of sound, they encounter a significant increase in drag, or force that resists the plane's movement through the air. Whitcomb made improvements to wings and how they attach to the fuselage to lessen the amount of drag on an airplane.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
There is much to admire in the design, to be released Thursday, for the $130-million museum Eli Broad plans to build on Bunker Hill downtown, including a dramatic honeycombed cast-concrete skin, a glass-enclosed lobby with an undulating ceiling and a column-free top-floor exhibition space covering nearly an acre. The unveiling of the design will also bring with it some encouraging news about the relationship between the building and the public realm. Broad is expected to announce Thursday that he is nearing an agreement with the Community Redevelopment Agency, developer Related Cos. and city officials to build a new public plaza wrapping the southern and western sides of the museum and to widen the sidewalks on both sides of Grand between 2nd and 4th streets.
IMAGE
February 28, 2010 | Nora Zelevansky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Celebrities pull focus. And rightfully so: That is their job, after all. Annual Academy Awards evenings are no exception. Billy Crystal flies across the stage (and into Charlie Chaplin films), appropriating "Ol' Man River" and "People (Who Need People)" for his best-picture-themed musical revues. George Clooney, Sandra Bullock and other mega-stars read nonchalantly from teleprompters, adding improvised winks or quips. Hordes of hopeful dancers don garish costumes to tango or crunk through elaborate best-original-song performances.
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