Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDesign
IN THE NEWS

Design

HOME & GARDEN
December 19, 2009
When it comes to color, the subject of Kelly Wearstler's third coffee-table book, the Los Angeles-based designer writes: "I do not think there are any rules." That philosophy also applies to her literary efforts. Wearstler gained fame for creating high-voltage interiors filled with color, texture and pattern, but as an author, she plays the die-hard minimalist. "Hue" offers only an introductory Q & A with Wearstler that explores her philosophy of color and cites some of the architects, designers and artists who have inspired her. Photo captions don't exist, and credits and resources are found only in an index at the end of the book.
Advertisement
HOME & GARDEN
August 20, 2010
Regarding "Incredible Lightness," the July 31 cover article on a Venice house brightened by skylights, glass walls and glass flooring: Several big problems come to mind with all those creative openings. They undoubtedly give the house an eerie look and feel at night and let in too much light for sleeping. All that sunshine fades the furniture and furnishings. The heating and air conditioning bill must be astronomical. Enjoy your clever design. Stephany Yablow North Hollywood Architect Dennis Gibbens responds: Actually, the amount of glass and skylights means that I don't have to have supplemental lighting during the daytime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2000
Preservationists rightly strive to keep the 21st century from obliterating the 20th century, and we as a society are enriched by their efforts. Alas, even the most ardent preservationists cannot stop the deteriorating effects of time, and our beloved Hollywood Bowl band shell is clearly no longer capable of serving us as its designers originally intended. As a bowl subscriber for decades, I have long felt the shell's primary goals--acoustic and visual--have sadly suffered, but I would have loudly opposed any plan that discarded the original design for something more contemporary.
HOME & GARDEN
February 13, 2010
When Los Angeles designer Shawn Littrell ( www.shawnlittrell.com) read about an invasive bark beetle epidemic devastating our local forests, he was inspired to repurpose the insect-ravaged timber. Littrell's MvCvT tables (an acronym for Man vs. Climate Change vs. Trees) are made from wood slated for destruction by the U.S. Forest Service. The split-plank tables are 16 1/2 inches tall and 12 1/2 inches in diameter and are unfinished, so they generate a natural patina. Cost: $800 each. Look for the limited-edition pieces -- signed and numbered -- at Samuel Freeman Gallery at Bergamot Station, 2525 Michigan Ave., Santa Monica; (310)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1996
Student engineers at Cal State Northridge are putting their design abilities to the test in the Future Car Challenge, a two-year contest sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research and the Big Three auto makers--General Motors, Ford and Chrysler. Students at a dozen universities throughout North America are trying to design a car acceptable to consumers that gets three times the gas mileage of current cars.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Shopclass, the latest home decor store on York Boulevard in Highland Park, opened this month with floor-to-ceiling stacks of vintage Dutch Modernism, furniture reupholstered with an eclectic touch, thrift store art and enough oddities to please flea market junkies. The emporium is the vision of interior designer Sally Breer, vintage dealer and Texas transplant Jeff Garbs and furniture importer Ellen LeCompte of Amsterdam Modern . The partners considered downtown L.A. and Echo Park, Breer said, but ultimately chose Highland Park for its “community vibe.” Workshops on rewiring lamps, making your own headboard and other DIY endeavors will be part of the draw - a strategy that has worked well for the Pop-Hop bookstore, Platform design boutique and other businesses on the ever-evolving stretch of York between Aldama Street and Avenue 50. (If you missed it, check out our home-centric look at York Boulevard published a year ago.)
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By David A. Keeps
For those who take decorating their outdoor rooms as seriously as their interiors, Niche has long been a resource for big-ticket European designs. The store, which represents the work of Milan-based Italian designers Patricia Urquiola, Paola Lenti and Rodolpho Dordoni, recently moved to an indoor-outdoor space at 8770 Beverly Blvd. Now Niche owner and designer Robina Benson is discounting all the merchandise at her former location with savings by 25% to 60% in a sale that starts Monday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2009 | T. Rees Shapiro
Richard Whitcomb, a mechanical engineer who changed the way we fly today with three design innovations that made airplanes fly farther and faster using less fuel, has died. He was 88. Whitcomb died of pneumonia Tuesday in Newport News, Va. His contributions, for which he won the most prestigious prize in aviation, focused on a plane's efficiency cutting through air at speeds approaching the sound barrier, or the "transonic region." As airplanes approach the speed of sound, they encounter a significant increase in drag, or force that resists the plane's movement through the air. Whitcomb made improvements to wings and how they attach to the fuselage to lessen the amount of drag on an airplane.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|