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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Tom Ford and his longtime partner, Richard Buckley, have gotten married, the designer revealed at an event in London on Monday night.  "We are now married, which is nice," the 52-year-old told Vogue . "I know that was just made legal in the U.K., which is great; we were married in the States. " The two - who've been together for 27 years after first meeting at a 1986 fashion show when Ford was 25 - have a son, Alexander John Buckley Ford,  born in September 2012.  Having Alexander around has changed life in at least one big way for Ford, who said Monday night that he carries a cellphone only because there's an app that allows him to watch the boy sleeping.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Martha Groves
A ranch-style Brentwood house designed by noted architect Paul R. Williams and threatened last November with demolition has been designated as a Los Angeles landmark. The city of Los Angeles initiated the landmark status after Disney Chief Executive Robert Iger and other preservation-minded neighbors alerted officials to the structure's imminent razing. The Los Angeles City Council voted April 2 to declare the residence a historic-cultural monument. The 1940 house in the leafy Oakmont section of Brentwood was built for Nelle Payton Hunt, widow of Willis G. Hunt, a paper company executive.
IMAGE
April 7, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles-based models-turned-fashion-designers Anine Bing and Katheryn Rice both count Alessandra Ambrosio and Rosie Huntington-Whiteley among those stepping out in their clothes, and each captures a take on effortless West Coast style. But the similarities end there. Both designers "understand what the cool girls like, in a different way. But it's the same girl," says Jeannie Lee, owner of Satine boutique on West 3rd Street, which carries both lines. Hard rock Danish-born Bing's eponymous label (www.aninebing.com)
IMAGE
April 6, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt
Dee Dee Penny has a real penchant for black vintage garb, such as high-waisted glamazon shorts and sheer mesh tops, and second-skin leather jackets and mini-dresses. It's a gothic-meets-go-go-girl look that signals a readily identifiable aesthetic for Penny - and one that might work well for an indie pop band. Enter the Dum Dum Girls. Penny (born Kristin Gundred in San Leandro, Calif.) created the Girls as a solo project in 2008. Now she's the fashionable frontwoman of a five-member group, comprising drummer Sandra Vu, bassist Malia James and guitarists Jules Medeiros and Andrew Miller, on tour to promote their third studio album, "Too True," released on Sub Pop Records in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By David Ng
Architect Frank Gehry's design for the long-in-the-works Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial in Washington was dealt a serious setback on Thursday when a federal commission voted to reject the controversial design. The National Capital Planning Commission said that it disapproves of the current design by Gehry, singling out the design's call for large, metal tapestries and the effect that those tapestries would have on the view to and from Capitol Hill.  The commission, which voted 7-3 to reject the design, also requested that the memorial's backers revise the design to better accommodate pedestrian traffic, public lighting and other factors.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Susan Denley
Peter Som's capsule collection for DesigNation at Kohl's isn't due to go on sale until April 10, but 20 pieces -- including those pictured here -- are being featured in a preview sale that starts Friday. The breezy collection is inspired by the French Caribbean island of St. Barths and would be perfect for spring break or summer vacations.  The clothes are designed, according to Kohl's, to "evoke the colors, the culture, the bliss of island life. " Those words alone are making me want to go on vacation.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
It's that time of the year again, when candidates for elected office push the limits of their imagination and public gullibility with ballot designations. California gives candidates three words to describe their principal profession, vocation or occupation on the ballot, and the freedom to create one's persona and potentially sway public perception leads to some creative designations. However, there are enough checks in the system to ensure candidates don't mislead voters: The choice of words has to pass muster with elections officials and can be challenged in court, which is why we have several recent instances in which ballot designations have been rejected.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Michael Whitley was named Assistant Managing Editor in December 2007.  Whitley joined The Times in April 2003 as deputy design director for news after serving as team leader for news and projects at the Charlotte Observer. In January 2006 he was named design director for news, overseeing design for the A, California, Business and Sports sections.  He previously served as projects designer at the San Diego Union-Tribune and the deputy design director for news and sports at the Copley Suburban Chicago Newspapers.
SCIENCE
March 29, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists say they have created a "designer chromosome" in brewer's yeast that will mutate on command. In a study published this week in Science , researchers said they had successfully "synthesized" one of the 16 chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae -- a workhorse fungi that is used in myriad industrial processes, including making bread, brewing beer, producing biofuel and manufacturing vaccines. "We have a yeast that looks, smells and behaves like a regular yeast, but this yeast is endowed with properties normal yeast don't have," said lead study scientist Jef Boeke, director of the NYU Langone Medical Center's Institute for Systems Genetics.
HOME & GARDEN
March 29, 2014 | By Carren Jao
Fredda Weiss used to tell people visiting her Mandeville Canyon cottage for the first time to watch for the house "that looks like the seven dwarfs live there. " Weiss' 1950s home was warm and inviting - but also a little dark and dated. So after three decades of living in the 2,283-square-foot cottage, Weiss decided to give her storybook home a happy ending. And she had just the architect in mind: Zoltan Pali. "If I was going to do this house, he was going to be my architect," Weiss says.
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