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Detainees

NATIONAL
March 28, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Under gray skies all but obscured by an opaque canopy and high concrete walls topped with razor wire, two bearded young men in tan tunics are having "rec time" inside separate chain-link pens. One jogs frenziedly back and forth in the 30-foot enclosure; the other is curled like a fetus at the base of a cement block. It's a dreary winter afternoon, but the scene could be any time of the day or night. The hour for rec time is one of the few unpredictable features in a day in the life of a detainee.
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OPINION
March 28, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Solitary confinement in immigration detention centers across the nation is often overused and arbitrarily applied. According to data obtained by the National Immigrant Justice Center, as many as 300 immigrants, or about 1% of all detainees in the 50 largest facilities in the country, are confined to small cells on any given day, even though many pose no security risk. In many cases, they're held there for 23 hours each day without a break, often for weeks. The use of solitary confinement is troubling enough in regular state and federal prisons, where inmates held in such conditions for prolonged periods are at risk for severe mental illness and suicide, according to medical experts.
NEWS
March 2, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In addition to banana rats, tarantulas and scorpions, this outpost is home to 3-foot-long iguanas, a protected species. It is also home to 300 increasingly angry prisoners of the war in Afghanistan whose status is far less defined, and that, admit U.S. military officials who are in charge of this makeshift prison, is becoming a problem. In unprecedented legal limbo as the U.S.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2006 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Detainees facing war crimes charges should have the right to represent themselves, despite Pentagon decisions that have "messed up" the military's ability to conduct fair trials, an Army defense lawyer said Friday. The right of accused individuals to self-representation is one of many issues in dispute as the military prepares to hear cases against 10 people whom the U.S. has designated as enemy combatants and detained at Guantanamo camps.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Republicans in Congress mocked the Obama administration's plans to improve conditions for immigrants held in county jails and detention facilities Wednesday, saying that a raft of reforms written byU.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement amounts to coddling lawbreakers. In a hearing titled "Holiday on ICE," Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, took aim at recent administrative changes designed to improve medical care for detainees, reduce incidents of sexual abuse, and increase access to safe water and outdoor recreation, among other reforms.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2007 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
A senior enlisted man testified Wednesday that he had angrily asked over a military radio why his soldiers had not killed several Iraqi men they had taken into custody during a combat sweep in Iraq last May. Minutes later, three detainees were shot dead. A 101st Airborne Division squad leader, Staff Sgt. Raymond L. Girouard, is charged with ordering his soldiers to kill the Iraqis. "I don't understand why ... we have these guys alive!" 1st Sgt.
OPINION
September 23, 2009
For those who followed the debate over the legal rights of suspected terrorists at Guantanamo Bay, it might seem like a case of deja vu. This time the question is whether about 600 detainees held by the United States at Bagram air base in Afghanistan can challenge their confinement in U.S. courts. Like the Bush administration with Guantanamo, the Obama administration is opposing such access. It is appealing a federal judge's ruling allowing three Bagram prisoners to seek writs of habeas corpus.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2008 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon announced Monday that it was seeking the death penalty against alleged Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and five other men, in a move that will probably ensure that the controversial military commissions at the Guantanamo Bay prison live on into the next presidential administration. The murder and conspiracy charges against the six men accused of planning the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon would be the first capital cases against any of the nearly 800 detainees who have been brought to the U.S. military prison in Cuba.
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