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Detainees

OPINION
August 8, 2002
Your Aug. 6 editorial, "Secrecy vs. the Republic," addressed only part of the violation of rights committed by our Justice Department. We the people do need to know the names of those jailed after the 9/11 attacks. We also need to protest in favor of the constitutional rights that prohibit their detention without due process. This point was driven home to me during a discussion at the Manzanar exhibit at the Japanese-American National Museum last Sunday. One of the survivors of the camp and I bemoaned the fact that the violations of U.S. law based on racial profiling that led to that camp were being used today against Arabs living in our country, many of whom are U.S. citizens.
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OPINION
March 28, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Solitary confinement in immigration detention centers across the nation is often overused and arbitrarily applied. According to data obtained by the National Immigrant Justice Center, as many as 300 immigrants, or about 1% of all detainees in the 50 largest facilities in the country, are confined to small cells on any given day, even though many pose no security risk. In many cases, they're held there for 23 hours each day without a break, often for weeks. The use of solitary confinement is troubling enough in regular state and federal prisons, where inmates held in such conditions for prolonged periods are at risk for severe mental illness and suicide, according to medical experts.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2006 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Detainees facing war crimes charges should have the right to represent themselves, despite Pentagon decisions that have "messed up" the military's ability to conduct fair trials, an Army defense lawyer said Friday. The right of accused individuals to self-representation is one of many issues in dispute as the military prepares to hear cases against 10 people whom the U.S. has designated as enemy combatants and detained at Guantanamo camps.
WORLD
February 14, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim
"What is this place?" the guard shouted. "The end of the world!" the prisoners replied. "Are you happy with the food?" he demanded. "Yes, sir!" they answered. "Have you been tamed?" he asked. "Yes, sir!" As ordered, they answered as one. And over the next five hellish days, they forged a bond that would remain even when they were freed. Cut off from the world, the 147 Iranian protesters rounded up during a July 9 demonstration in Tehran and stuffed into the notorious Kahrizak prison found they could rely only on themselves.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2007 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
A senior enlisted man testified Wednesday that he had angrily asked over a military radio why his soldiers had not killed several Iraqi men they had taken into custody during a combat sweep in Iraq last May. Minutes later, three detainees were shot dead. A 101st Airborne Division squad leader, Staff Sgt. Raymond L. Girouard, is charged with ordering his soldiers to kill the Iraqis. "I don't understand why ... we have these guys alive!" 1st Sgt.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Republicans in Congress mocked the Obama administration's plans to improve conditions for immigrants held in county jails and detention facilities Wednesday, saying that a raft of reforms written byU.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement amounts to coddling lawbreakers. In a hearing titled "Holiday on ICE," Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, took aim at recent administrative changes designed to improve medical care for detainees, reduce incidents of sexual abuse, and increase access to safe water and outdoor recreation, among other reforms.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2008 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon announced Monday that it was seeking the death penalty against alleged Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and five other men, in a move that will probably ensure that the controversial military commissions at the Guantanamo Bay prison live on into the next presidential administration. The murder and conspiracy charges against the six men accused of planning the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon would be the first capital cases against any of the nearly 800 detainees who have been brought to the U.S. military prison in Cuba.
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