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Detection Devices

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1999 | From A Times staff writer
Police responding Sunday to reports of a body buried in Reseda along the banks of the Los Angeles River instead unearthed expensive seismic monitoring equipment. A man called the Los Angeles Police Department West Valley Division around 3:15 p.m. after two people were seen burying an object next to the river, said Police Sgt. George Wright.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police responding to reports of a body buried along a bank of the Los Angeles River on Sunday instead unearthed seismic monitoring equipment. A man called the Los Angeles Police Department's West Valley Division about 3:15 p.m. after a man and a woman were seen burying an object inside the boundaries of the Los Angeles River, said LAPD Sgt. George Wright.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the U.S. Navy looks to the future, it sees a serious threat from an increasing number of super-quiet, fully armed submarines controlled by potentially hostile Third World countries. To enhance its ability to detect enemy submarines before they can launch a strike at a U.S. ship or land-based target, the Navy has spent $350 million over the last decade to develop an improved underwater sonar system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call him prescient; call him paranoid. Either way, City Councilman Rudy Svorinich Jr. was right. During a debate Wednesday over security at City Hall, the councilman said he knew exactly how the news media would spin the story. He predicted that today's accounts of the lawmakers' 8-2 vote would read: The Los Angeles City Council took a bold step toward protecting the public Wednesday by deciding to protect itself first. "I know that's going to be the article," Svorinich said.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1999 | LEE DYE
The increasingly ubiquitous digital camera has taken another step into the future with the development of the first such camera that senses only ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light has shorter wavelengths than visible light. It is sometimes called black light because it causes some materials to glow in the dark. Normal digital cameras "see" light that is visible to the human eye, sometimes called white light.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As kids scramble back to classrooms across the nation, the jangle of school bells has some dissonant new accompaniments: the electronic beep of metal detectors, the robotic swivel of surveillance cameras, the crackle of walkie-talkies and the thwop-thwop-thwop of SWAT-team helicopters. After a sobering two years of school shootings, a growing number of school systems this fall has embraced measures designed to safeguard children against the armed rage of violent classmates or deranged adults.
NEWS
August 17, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have the intimidating look of the average 50,000-pound big rig, but the trucks used by America's fifth-largest hauler are different--and safer. A radar sensor sits on the center of the semi-truck's front bumper. Another is mounted on the right side, just behind the door. Inside the cab, colored lights flash to tell drivers that a car is too close or that they are about to change lanes with a car in the blind spot.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Shares of ChromaVision Medical Systems Inc. rose 34% after the money-losing medical device company won regulatory clearance to sell its computer-based system to help physicians detect early-stage cancer. Shares of the San Juan Capistrano-based company rose $3.88 to close at $15.13 on Nasdaq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It didn't take long for people to start piling up Tuesday when guards switched on metal detectors at the door to the Los Angeles County Courthouse. And it didn't take long for confiscated "weapons" to start piling up, either. "One had a paring knife. One person was carrying some specialty shears. One had pepper spray," said Sheriff's Sgt. John Stites, who is in charge of 45 new guards at the North Hill Street building.
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