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Detection Devices

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Research is underway into an earthquake early warning system that would allow buildings to be "stiffened" to cope with violent quakes just seconds before they occur, a Caltech seismologist said Friday. Basically, the weak primary waves that begin a quake would be analyzed by instruments, which would send an electronic signal to flex a building for the violent secondary waves that would hit seconds later.
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NEWS
March 3, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Alarmed by growing hints of Al Qaeda's progress toward obtaining a nuclear or radiological weapon, the Bush administration has deployed hundreds of sophisticated sensors since November to U.S. borders, overseas facilities and choke points around Washington. Officials have placed the Delta Force, the nation's elite commando unit, on a new standby alert to seize control of nuclear materials that the sensors may detect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2002 | JENNIFER OLDHAM and JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The entire south side of Los Angeles International Airport was shut down for several hours Thursday morning and at least 10,000 passengers were evacuated after security employees discovered that a metal detector in Terminal No. 4 had been unplugged. The machine, known as a magnetometer, wasn't working for at least an hour during the morning rush at the world's third-busiest airport, allowing dozens of passengers to pass through it without being screened, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2001 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High-tech security equipment that could be used someday at airports nationwide to detect weapons, chemicals and potential terrorists was demonstrated Tuesday at Burbank Airport. Reps. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) and Brad Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks) attended the demonstration during the nation's busiest travel week and the day after President Bush signed a bill to improve aviation security.
NEWS
October 21, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As law enforcement agencies around the nation scramble to purchase devices that can detect biological hazards such as anthrax, experts in the field offer this warning: Buyer, beware. Although many firms are selling devices to sniff out pathogens in the air and the soil, the technology still is in an early stage of development. Most devices now on the market can detect just a few of the more than two dozen biological agents that could plausibly be harnessed as weapons of war or terrorism.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | Dave Wilson
Who hasn't been jarred by the electronic jangle of a cell phone at some inopportune moment? Whether during a cousin's wedding or a performance of "Rigoletto," it's a pretty safe bet that some chucklehead's phone will go off. Wouldn't it be nice to head off these nattering nincompoops? The problem is that no one knows which self-centered moron has left a cell phone turned on--until the thing starts squealing. It's not just rude.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2001 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana school officials are considering buying a digital scanning security system that purports to detect weapons on a person and pinpoint where and how many are being carried. The officials said the system, if purchased, would be used at sporting and other events that attract large crowds. "It is very inconspicuous and effective," said Al Mijares, superintendent of the 60,000-student Santa Ana Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2001 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana school officials are considering buying a digital-scanning security system that purports to detect weapons on a person and pinpoint their number and location. School officials said the system, if purchased, would be deployed at sporting and other events that attract large crowds. "It is very inconspicuous and effective," said Al Mijares, superintendent of the 60,000-student Santa Ana Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One recent morning, an ex-con harboring a grudge and hiding a 14-inch butcher knife swaggered through the door of Orange County's Central Justice Center. The blade was tucked behind his shirt and deep inside his waistband. It set off an alarm as he passed through one of the courthouse's five metal detectors.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Demand for sophisticated technology used in airport security systems is likely to jump dramatically in the wake of Federal Aviation Administration guidelines issued Wednesday. A handful of companies could benefit, including Invision Technologies Inc., based in Newark, Calif., which markets million-dollar electronic explosive-detection machines for airports.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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