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Detection Devices

BUSINESS
September 13, 1999 | LEE DYE
The increasingly ubiquitous digital camera has taken another step into the future with the development of the first such camera that senses only ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light has shorter wavelengths than visible light. It is sometimes called black light because it causes some materials to glow in the dark. Normal digital cameras "see" light that is visible to the human eye, sometimes called white light.
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NEWS
September 7, 1999 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As kids scramble back to classrooms across the nation, the jangle of school bells has some dissonant new accompaniments: the electronic beep of metal detectors, the robotic swivel of surveillance cameras, the crackle of walkie-talkies and the thwop-thwop-thwop of SWAT-team helicopters. After a sobering two years of school shootings, a growing number of school systems this fall has embraced measures designed to safeguard children against the armed rage of violent classmates or deranged adults.
NEWS
August 17, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have the intimidating look of the average 50,000-pound big rig, but the trucks used by America's fifth-largest hauler are different--and safer. A radar sensor sits on the center of the semi-truck's front bumper. Another is mounted on the right side, just behind the door. Inside the cab, colored lights flash to tell drivers that a car is too close or that they are about to change lanes with a car in the blind spot.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Shares of ChromaVision Medical Systems Inc. rose 34% after the money-losing medical device company won regulatory clearance to sell its computer-based system to help physicians detect early-stage cancer. Shares of the San Juan Capistrano-based company rose $3.88 to close at $15.13 on Nasdaq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It didn't take long for people to start piling up Tuesday when guards switched on metal detectors at the door to the Los Angeles County Courthouse. And it didn't take long for confiscated "weapons" to start piling up, either. "One had a paring knife. One person was carrying some specialty shears. One had pepper spray," said Sheriff's Sgt. John Stites, who is in charge of 45 new guards at the North Hill Street building.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
In Silicon Valley, even the parking meters are networked. A wireless network enables 50 parking meters in the city of Burlingame to send real-time alarms and other signals to a police dispatcher when the meters are tampered with. Burlingame police have arrested 27 people suspected of trying to steal from parking meters since the radio network was deployed in February, and none of the money in those meters has been stolen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999
DCH Technology Inc. of Valencia said it is doubling its hydrogen-sensor manufacturing facilities. The company's newly appointed production manager, James K. Sobie, said the expansion was necessary to accommodate growing demand from a broad range of industries. DCH manufactures patented and proprietary gas sensors and safety products. Customers include NASA, Westinghouse, Ford, Lockheed Martin and General Motors.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The government called for faster installation of better flight recorders on Boeing 737 commercial jets. The Federal Aviation Administration proposed requiring airlines to install flight data recorders that can track more functions, especially those related to the rudder. The proposal comes after the National Transportation Safety Board ruled that a rudder-control valve caused the 1994 crash of USAir Flight 427 near Pittsburgh, killing all 132 people on board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1999 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're planning a trip to the main county courthouse in Santa Ana, you'd better get used to a new routine beginning April 16: electronic metal detectors at all entrances for the first time. Orange County Marshal John E. Fuller, who oversees court security, concedes some people won't like it. "For some, a two-minute wait is enough to complain [about]. But it will mean a safer courthouse for visitors and those who work there."
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