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NEWS
July 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Twelve-term U.S. Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) filed petitions Monday to make him eligible to run for mayor against incumbent Coleman A. Young, who is seeking an unprecedented fifth term. Conyers, 60, a Democrat, filed his petitions with City Clerk James Bradley. "He has more than enough petitions to make him eligible, and they're still bringing more in," said Amelie Allen, a worker in the clerk's office. Candidates have until 4 p.m. today to become eligible to run in the nonpartisan Sept.
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NEWS
October 20, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a prayer breakfast last week, Rev. Charles Adams, a former president of the local NAACP, needed just a few choice words to inflame the already racially charged contest for the mayor of Detroit. "They (the suburbs) want a mayor to shuffle when he's not going anywhere, scratch when he's not itching and grin when he's not tickled," he said. Adams, who is supporting Sharon McPhail in the nonpartisan Nov.
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NEWS
August 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Detroit voters were turning thumbs down on casino gambling Tuesday, while Republicans statewide chose former congressman Jim Dunn to challenge Democratic Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. Dunn and Robert Huber, both millionaires, spent about $200,000 each trying to attract support for an underdog race against Riegle, a popular liberal who had no primary opposition in his bid for a third term. The referendum on casino gambling was put on the ballot by opponents of the plan championed by Mayor Coleman A.
NEWS
June 23, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coleman A. Young, the feisty, salty-tongued mayor of this downtrodden city for 20 years, said Tuesday that he would not seek a sixth term, thus making way for a new generation of leadership. Young, 75, cited his poor health as a factor in his decision. He suffers from emphysema, and has limited public appearances much of the past year as his vigor has been sapped.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will he or won't he? That has been the main topic of political discussion here recently as Mayor Coleman A. Young keeps everyone guessing about whether he will run for a sixth four-year term. It is a guessing game that the 75-year-old Democrat appears to relish. He has tantalized the public and the media with his indecision, and his close associates insist he has not made up his mind. The filing deadline is Tuesday.
NEWS
July 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
Mayor Coleman A. Young, the outspoken leader of the nation's sixth-largest city for more than 15 years, said Tuesday that he will run for a fifth term. "Ain't nobody going to run me out," Young, 71, told the crowd at a downtown community center. In the nonpartisan mayoral primary Sept. 12, voters will select two candidates for a runoff Nov. 7.
NEWS
October 20, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a prayer breakfast last week, Rev. Charles Adams, a former president of the local NAACP, needed just a few choice words to inflame the already racially charged contest for the mayor of Detroit. "They (the suburbs) want a mayor to shuffle when he's not going anywhere, scratch when he's not itching and grin when he's not tickled," he said. Adams, who is supporting Sharon McPhail in the nonpartisan Nov.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Plagued with crime, drugs and a shortage of jobs, Detroit often seems desperate for a shortcut to the kind of economic recovery that has come to other aging industrial cities in the 1980s. To Coleman A. Young, Detroit's powerful mayor, casino gambling is the latest potential cure for what ails the Motor City. "The issue is jobs," Young's spokesman, Bob Berg, said.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Despite a virtually broken economy, a tidal wave of drug-related crime and a massive population exodus to the suburbs, Detroit seemed poised to reelect Mayor Coleman A. Young to an unprecedented fifth term this year. Although the 71-year-old Young's popularity had plunged as voters started losing patience with conditions in the city, earlier this summer it appeared that he would easily fend off the weak field of candidates challenging him in next Tuesday's primary.
NEWS
August 4, 1988
Detroit's rejection of casino gambling proves voters don't all "walk in lock-step" with Mayor Coleman A. Young, an opponent said. With all precincts reporting, an ordinance outlawing casinos was approved 82,271 to 50,890, or 62% to 38%. Young, a long-time proponent of casino gambling as a way to revitalize the city's economy, campaigned heavily against the ban.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will he or won't he? That has been the main topic of political discussion here recently as Mayor Coleman A. Young keeps everyone guessing about whether he will run for a sixth four-year term. It is a guessing game that the 75-year-old Democrat appears to relish. He has tantalized the public and the media with his indecision, and his close associates insist he has not made up his mind. The filing deadline is Tuesday.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Firefighters got some relief Tuesday night when an outbreak of arson declined, a day after a massive anti-crime effort by an estimated 30,000 firefighters, police officers and volunteers failed to prevent hundreds of houses and abandoned buildings from being set ablaze throughout Detroit during the annual Devil's Night arson spree. Fifty-one juveniles were arrested for ignoring a curfew Tuesday, the last night in the three-day arson outbreak that left at least 10 families homeless.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Despite a virtually broken economy, a tidal wave of drug-related crime and a massive population exodus to the suburbs, Detroit seemed poised to reelect Mayor Coleman A. Young to an unprecedented fifth term this year. Although the 71-year-old Young's popularity had plunged as voters started losing patience with conditions in the city, earlier this summer it appeared that he would easily fend off the weak field of candidates challenging him in next Tuesday's primary.
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Twelve-term U.S. Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) filed petitions Monday to make him eligible to run for mayor against incumbent Coleman A. Young, who is seeking an unprecedented fifth term. Conyers, 60, a Democrat, filed his petitions with City Clerk James Bradley. "He has more than enough petitions to make him eligible, and they're still bringing more in," said Amelie Allen, a worker in the clerk's office. Candidates have until 4 p.m. today to become eligible to run in the nonpartisan Sept.
NEWS
August 4, 1988
Detroit's rejection of casino gambling proves voters don't all "walk in lock-step" with Mayor Coleman A. Young, an opponent said. With all precincts reporting, an ordinance outlawing casinos was approved 82,271 to 50,890, or 62% to 38%. Young, a long-time proponent of casino gambling as a way to revitalize the city's economy, campaigned heavily against the ban.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Detroit voters were turning thumbs down on casino gambling Tuesday, while Republicans statewide chose former congressman Jim Dunn to challenge Democratic Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. Dunn and Robert Huber, both millionaires, spent about $200,000 each trying to attract support for an underdog race against Riegle, a popular liberal who had no primary opposition in his bid for a third term. The referendum on casino gambling was put on the ballot by opponents of the plan championed by Mayor Coleman A.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Firefighters got some relief Tuesday night when an outbreak of arson declined, a day after a massive anti-crime effort by an estimated 30,000 firefighters, police officers and volunteers failed to prevent hundreds of houses and abandoned buildings from being set ablaze throughout Detroit during the annual Devil's Night arson spree. Fifty-one juveniles were arrested for ignoring a curfew Tuesday, the last night in the three-day arson outbreak that left at least 10 families homeless.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Plagued with crime, drugs and a shortage of jobs, Detroit often seems desperate for a shortcut to the kind of economic recovery that has come to other aging industrial cities in the 1980s. To Coleman A. Young, Detroit's powerful mayor, casino gambling is the latest potential cure for what ails the Motor City. "The issue is jobs," Young's spokesman, Bob Berg, said.
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