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April 20, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a black political leader in America, the allegations publicly leveled against Detroit Mayor Coleman A. Young could hardly have been more embarrassing. Young, the 71-year-old, five-term mayor of the nation's sixth largest city and a longtime civil rights advocate, had reportedly helped establish, secretly, a private business that sold South African Krugerrands, the gold coins that symbolize apartheid to many Americans.
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NEWS
December 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Mayor Dennis Archer won't talk about his legacy as he leaves office after eight years, but his fingerprints are on three casinos, two ballparks, two major corporate headquarters relocating downtown and a contract to host the 2006 Super Bowl. Monday is the last day in office for the former state Supreme Court justice, who in 1994 became the second black mayor of the nation's 10th-largest city. Archer, who turns 60 on New Year's Day, is being succeeded by Kwame Kilpatrick, 31, who is also black.
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NEWS
September 21, 1989 | RUSHWORTH M. KIDDER, The Christian Science Monitor
John W. Porter has no illusions about the difficulties ahead. As the newly appointed superintendent of the Detroit Public Schools, he faces: - A high-school dropout rate of roughly 50%. - Kindergartens where half the entering children come from single-parent homes with unwed mothers. - Absenteeism that averages almost 20%. - Academic achievement well below the national average. - A $160-million budget deficit, accumulated over the past 17 years. - A state-mandated cut of $50.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Dennis Archer, who brought casino gambling to Detroit and pursued other revitalization projects aimed at erasing the city's image as a blighted, riot-scarred landscape, said in a surprise announcement that he would not seek reelection in November. "I love this city. I love our citizens and I really enjoyed the opportunity and experience of being mayor. But I also realize that I have no life," the 59-year-old Democrat said.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal grand jury indicted a former Detroit deputy police chief with close ties to Mayor Coleman Young on charges of using his connections to Detroit city officials to defraud investors. The 36-count indictment accuses Kenneth Weiner, 44, and two other men of running a multimillion-dollar fraud scheme. Weiner, a security consultant, worked closely with Young in the early 80s. The mayor had established a consulting firm, Detroit Technology & Investments Inc., in 1987.
NEWS
July 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
Mayor Coleman A. Young, the outspoken leader of the nation's sixth-largest city for more than 15 years, said Tuesday that he will run for a fifth term. "Ain't nobody going to run me out," Young, 71, told the crowd at a downtown community center. In the nonpartisan mayoral primary Sept. 12, voters will select two candidates for a runoff Nov. 7.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Detroit Mayor Coleman Young, who ran the city for an unprecedented 20 years, was under FBI surveillance for roughly four decades, the Detroit News reported. Records obtained under the federal Freedom of Information Act show the surveillance began in the 1940s when agents who suspected the well-known labor activist had communist ties followed him to union organizing meetings, the newspaper said.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Dennis Archer, who brought casino gambling to Detroit and pursued other revitalization projects aimed at erasing the city's image as a blighted, riot-scarred landscape, said in a surprise announcement that he would not seek reelection in November. "I love this city. I love our citizens and I really enjoyed the opportunity and experience of being mayor. But I also realize that I have no life," the 59-year-old Democrat said.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Detroit Mayor Coleman Young replaced his indicted police chief, William Hart. But Young accused federal prosecutors of waging a vendetta against black officials. Young and Hart are black. "The chief was indicted because he got caught in a trap that was set for me," Young said. Young appointed Stanley Knox, 51, as police chief. Hart and former civilian Deputy Chief Kenneth Weiner, an ex-business partner of the mayor's, have been charged with embezzling $2.6 million from a secret police fund.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
A former police official suspected in the disappearance of money from a secret $1.4-million Police Department fund was arrested Thursday on fraud charges. Kenneth Weiner, a former civilian deputy chief who resigned in 1986 amid allegations of a pyramid scheme, was arrested as he stepped off a flight from Los Angeles, FBI officials said. They refused to say how they had learned of his travel plans.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Detroit Mayor Coleman Young, who ran the city for an unprecedented 20 years, was under FBI surveillance for roughly four decades, the Detroit News reported. Records obtained under the federal Freedom of Information Act show the surveillance began in the 1940s when agents who suspected the well-known labor activist had communist ties followed him to union organizing meetings, the newspaper said.
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before moving into the mayor's office a year ago, Dennis Archer made a point of crossing Eight Mile Road into what his predecessor, Coleman A. Young, once angrily dubbed the "hostile suburbs." Unlike the popular and controversial Young, who in his 20-year reign offended Detroit's neighbors with his acid tongue and divisive racial politics, Archer came to preach a kinder, gentler sermon.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Coleman A. Young won reelection as mayor of Detroit in 1985, the Detroit Free Press headline summed up the result: "It's Young's Town." Indeed, for the last 20 years Young has symbolized Detroit--profane, tough, street-smart, angry, confrontational. Young, who announced this week that he will not seek reelection, dominated his city like no other American mayor in the same period.
NEWS
June 23, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coleman A. Young, the feisty, salty-tongued mayor of this downtrodden city for 20 years, said Tuesday that he would not seek a sixth term, thus making way for a new generation of leadership. Young, 75, cited his poor health as a factor in his decision. He suffers from emphysema, and has limited public appearances much of the past year as his vigor has been sapped.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Detroit Mayor Coleman Young replaced his indicted police chief, William Hart. But Young accused federal prosecutors of waging a vendetta against black officials. Young and Hart are black. "The chief was indicted because he got caught in a trap that was set for me," Young said. Young appointed Stanley Knox, 51, as police chief. Hart and former civilian Deputy Chief Kenneth Weiner, an ex-business partner of the mayor's, have been charged with embezzling $2.6 million from a secret police fund.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | From Associated Press
The city's police chief and a former deputy chief who was a business partner of Mayor Coleman Young were indicted Monday in a federal probe of the theft of nearly $2.6 million from a secret police fund. A grand jury indicted Police Chief William Hart on seven counts and the former deputy chief, Kenneth Weiner, on five counts, U.S. Atty. Stephen Markman said.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Coleman A. Young, the black mayor of this deeply troubled city who is seeking an unprecedented fifth term, was sweeping to an easy victory in Tuesday's primary election. But in a surprising upset, a little-known conservative black businessman, Tom Barrow, was defeating John Conyers Jr., a powerful black Democratic congressman, for second place and the right to challenge Young in the Nov. 7 general election.
NEWS
April 20, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a black political leader in America, the allegations publicly leveled against Detroit Mayor Coleman A. Young could hardly have been more embarrassing. Young, the 71-year-old, five-term mayor of the nation's sixth largest city and a longtime civil rights advocate, had reportedly helped establish, secretly, a private business that sold South African Krugerrands, the gold coins that symbolize apartheid to many Americans.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal grand jury indicted a former Detroit deputy police chief with close ties to Mayor Coleman Young on charges of using his connections to Detroit city officials to defraud investors. The 36-count indictment accuses Kenneth Weiner, 44, and two other men of running a multimillion-dollar fraud scheme. Weiner, a security consultant, worked closely with Young in the early 80s. The mayor had established a consulting firm, Detroit Technology & Investments Inc., in 1987.
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