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NEWS
January 10, 2001 | Associated Press
Northwest Airlines agreed Tuesday to pay $7.1 million to more than 7,000 passengers forced to wait for hours on grounded airplanes at Detroit's airport during a storm in 1999. The airline admitted no wrongdoing in settling the class-action lawsuit. More than a dozen Northwest planes were stranded on snow-covered taxiways and tarmacs as a storm pounded the Midwest on Jan. 3, 1999. Passengers waited up to 11 hours on board and in some cases were subjected to overflowing toilets and a lack of food.
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NEWS
July 31, 1999 | MARK FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Boyce swapped a sick day from the assembly line for six hours of standing in a party line, one of hundreds of people dripping and squirming and dancing on the baked pavement, just dying for a duel to the debt with an invading army of one-armed bandits. Then the gates were unlocked, the doors to the fortress were flung open, and a black woman who may have built the transmission in your Ford Motor Co.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | STEVE TWOMEY, THE WASHINGTON POST
So many hours did they languish on the tarmac, sealed inside aircraft after aircraft, captives of snow and snafu, that on Eric Felgemacher's plane, his claustrophobic wife burst into tears. He half wondered if the engines would die, the heat would dissipate and a load of humanity would freeze. He picked up an air phone to alert the media, to get a court order maybe, only to encounter a dysfunctional phone system.
NEWS
July 5, 1997 | From Associated Press
After a storm knocked out their electricity and flooded their basement, three children and their grandmother died in a house that filled with carbon monoxide from a portable generator. The bodies of Maude Priester, 55, Darrell Hughes, 11, Tiera Hall, 6, and Jordan Burns, 6, were found by a relative Friday, increasing the death toll to 16 from storms that tore through southeastern Michigan on Wednesday.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
MGM Grand Inc. and a group of Detroit community leaders said they've formed a partnership to seek a state license to own and operate a casino in Detroit. Details of the partnership and a timetable weren't disclosed. Las Vegas-based MGM Grand, which is controlled by Kirk Kerkorian, also said its credit line will be boosted to $1 billion from $600 million, in part to finance construction of a Detroit casino. It didn't say what institutions would provide the financing.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Detroit is the next airport to announce an expansion as continuing domestic growth in airline travel begins to push limits of the nation's infrastructure. Northwest Airlines Corp. and Wayne County said there will be $1.6 billion in upgrades to Detroit Metropolitan Airport. The expansion will include an $800-million passenger terminal, a 10,000-foot runway, and additional aircraft parking and maintenance facilities. The airport, located in suburban Romulus, is Northwest's largest regional hub.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a boost to this city's troubled downtown, General Motors Corp. announced Thursday that it has purchased the landmark Renaissance Center and will establish its world headquarters there. With the move, GM fulfills both business and social objectives. It allows the consolidation of the company's far-flung administrative offices in one place while boosting efforts to revitalize Detroit's threadbare downtown.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | Associated Press
Hundreds of vacant buildings have been razed so they couldn't be set on fire and about 25,000 people volunteered to patrol the streets Monday for this year's drive against the destructive Devil's Night tradition. The night before Halloween has for years been celebrated as Devil's Night here with arson fires in trash piles and houses. Devil's Night fires peaked at 297 in 1985. Last year, Mayor Dennis Archer's first in office, fires rose again, to 182.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dirt and gravel have been scattered over the bloodstains, but there is no question that this is the spot. This is where the mortally wounded Malice Green sat--oddly upright and still--dying in the street. "Right here. Right here," says a visitor to the site in this rundown residential neighborhood. "I never thought I'd see what you all seen in Los Angeles right here. " Nor did Mayor Coleman Young.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Japanese nationalism that held sway at this week's trade talks in Tokyo shifted here Thursday as politicians, Japanese auto executives and American workers traded barbs in the hothouse atmosphere surrounding the Detroit auto show. But as they apportioned blame for the plight of the U.S. auto industry and the national economy, the rich mix of automobiles on display mocked the whole notion of political boundaries.
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