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Developmental Disabilities

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NEWS
December 10, 1991 | HERMAN WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You sense a natural affinity between Karen Hess and Renee Widera. "We do things together. We talk all the time. Renee is very special and I love her," says Hess, 18, a student in Corona del Mar High's program for the developmentally disabled. Her 1 1/2-year-old friendship with Widera, a UC Irvine biology junior, may have an everyday ordinariness about it, but it's far from conventional.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Californians with developmental disabilities who are cared for at state facilities are being put at risk by outdated policies and inadequate investigations of abuse, the state auditor's office said Tuesday. Allegations that residents have been raped, shot with stun guns and otherwise abused have not been acted on satisfactorily, auditors found. The California Department of Developmental Services cares for 1,480 severely disabled people in five facilities throughout the state.
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HEALTH
May 5, 2003 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
On her 40th birthday last June, Martha Billington moved out of the tidy shingled house that she grew up in in Melrose, Mass. As friends and family helped load her belongings onto a rented truck, Martha climbed into the cab and beeped the horn in happy celebration. Martha Billington, born with Down syndrome in 1962, was leaving the nest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2013 | By Jill Cowan, Los Angeles Times
On sunny days, from the right spot in its terraced courtyard, future residents of Glennwood House of Laguna Beach will see two Catalinas. One, of course, will be the island itself, the familiar brown sliver visible on the distant horizon. The other sits atop the aquamarine waters of a seascape mural that artist Robert Wyland helped prospective residents of Glennwood paint. Glennwood Housing Foundation Inc. is converting a senior assisted living facility off South Coast Highway into a house that will provide services to about 50 young adults with developmental disabilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCI Medical Center has received a $3.8-million federal grant to develop a core facility for the study and treatment of children with developmental disabilities, becoming one of only two institutions in the state to receive the much-coveted award. With the grant, UCI joins the ranks of such institutions as UCLA and Harvard Medical School in pursuing a coordinated program of research that will meld expertise in everything from Down's syndrome to attention deficit disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1999 | BILL BOWMAN, Bill Bowman is executive director of Regional Center of Orange County
Recently at the movie theater, I was delighted to see a couple of very dear friends. However, unlike most such chance encounters, I saw these friends on the screen when I viewed Garry Marshall's film, "The Other Sister. " It's a film about the coming of age of two young people with developmental disabilities, Carla and Danny. The film captures the essence of the multidimensional people I work with every day at Regional Center of Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997 | DAWN HOBBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents of a quiet Camarillo cul-de-sac are angry at the state for approving a board-and-care home for elderly, developmentally disabled women on their street, which neighbors fear will lower property values. Those living along Suner Circle, who have erected signs protesting the proposed four-bed facility, also worry that some of the women could be dangerous patients from soon-to-close Camarillo State Hospital. But state officials say such fears are baseless.
HEALTH
April 7, 2008 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
Nick DALEY, 28, has Prader-Willi Syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by short stature, low muscle tone and mild retardation. He's also been in 17 films and 11 television shows, including a guest-starring role in last season's TNT series "Saving Grace." "If I were a star, I would be on all over the world," he says. "I would be mobbed by fans. People would see my name and get my autograph." Blair Williamson, 28, is an actor with Down syndrome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1993 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a new take on the singin'-'round-the-campfire routine: a dozen campers in a semicircle of wheelchairs, chanting the lyrics of a popular rap song. Whoomp! (There It Is). Whoomp! (There It Is). Whoomp! (There It Is). Gloria Lang, 33, nodded her head rapidly, keeping time to the music blaring from a portable tape player. Danny Borsum, 37, grinned as he swayed to the thumping beat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1994
People with developmental disabilities and their families are invited to attend a picnic June 5 at Northwood Park. The event, sponsored by the city and the Soroptimist International club of Irvine, will include a barbecue lunch, music, dancing, games and face painting. A petting zoo will be featured, and people can view a police car and fire engine. The picnic runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and is free to people with developmental disabilities and their families.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Greg Donoghue grew up around film sets. His father worked as a film publicist in Europe and his uncle is Pierre Spengler, a producer of the "Superman" movies. But the 30-year-old had never seriously considered a career in the movie industry until he got a chance to direct his own short film called "Sunshine Manor," a love story about the relationship between a nursing home patient and her doctor. "It takes a lot of patience, and time is your worst enemy," Donoghue said of his directorial debut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Just weeks before the planned closure of adult day healthcare centers throughout California, state officials and disability rights attorneys reached a legal settlement Thursday that preserves services for those low-income seniors and disabled residents most at risk of being institutionalized. The state, which faces a $3.7-billion revenue shortfall, had targeted the centers as part of a plan to reduce spending on Medi-Cal, the government health program for the poor and disabled. Adult day healthcare centers provide nursing care, occupational therapy, physical therapy, meals and exercise to people with serious disabilities, brain injuries and chronic illnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As a prisoner of war in Germany during World War II, Richard Koch chose his life's work after reading one of the few books in the camp's meager library — the medical biography "The Doctors Mayo. " Liberated in 1945 after 13 months in captivity, he sped through his undergraduate years at UC Berkeley by persuading the school to give him course credit for his bombardier training in the Army Air Forces. In 1951, Koch — pronounced "coke" — earned a medical degree from the University of Rochester in New York, joined Children's Hospital Los Angeles and embarked on a groundbreaking career in developmental disabilities.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
One in every six American children now has a developmental disability, a 15% increase since 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Monday. The increase is due almost entirely to an increase in the prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and is based on reports by parents during a telephone survey, researchers reported in the journal Pediatrics. But because ADHD has become a catchall phrase for a variety of behavioral problems in schools and elsewhere, it is not clear whether the increase represents a real upsurge in such developmental delays or simply parental and physician attribution of old behaviors to a disorder that might be treated with drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2011 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
Two men who died in a boating accident in San Diego Bay over the weekend were identified as a father and son who were on an outing organized for developmentally disabled people, authorities said Monday. All 10 aboard the 26-foot sailboat, including two children, were tossed into the frigid waters off Harbor Island on Sunday afternoon when the boat flipped over for reasons that have yet to be determined. Seven of the 10 were family members. Chao Chen, 73, and his son, Jun Chen, 48, of San Diego were pronounced dead at the scene by San Diego Harbor Police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2011 | By Lisa Girion, Los Angeles Times
Advocates for the disabled are urging a Los Angeles County judge to throw out a plea bargain for an employee of an El Monte day care center who confessed to sexually assaulting three mentally disabled clients, saying his eight-year-sentence was an injustice. The proposed sentence for Juan Fernando Flores "does not reflect the harm sustained by the victims nor the severity of the crimes committed," Robert J. Baldo, executive director of the Assn. of Regional Center Agencies, said in a letter to Superior Court Judge Jack Hunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky has appointed two San Fernando Valley residents to serve on county commissions, his office announced Monday. Shirin A. Chase, a Sylmar resident, was selected to serve on the county's Probation Commission, and Irene Oros, of Canoga Park, was picked for the Developmental Disabilities Board. Chase, who works as a family therapist with Lake View Terrace-based Hathaway Children's Services, is a member of the California Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2000 | Tariq Malik, (714) 520-2503
Students from the Cleta Harder Developmental School, which offers instruction for children and adults with developmental disabilities and brain injuries, will hit the sand and surf Friday at the Long Beach Sea Festival. The students are joining about 100 other people with physical disabilities, ages 2 and older, invited by the Long Beach Boat and Ski Club for the event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Unified School District officials are reviewing personnel and curriculum at Widney High School, which serves developmentally disabled children, because staff members are doing a poor job of teaching the students and automatically giving overtime to workers who leave early and arrive late, according to documents and interviews. During a recent visit to the Jefferson Park campus, Supt. Ramon C. Cortines observed instructors watching a soap opera during class time. "They didn't even make an effort to turn it off when I was there," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2010 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
When Robert Edward Stansbury died seven years ago while awaiting execution on San Quentin's death row, some worried that he would take the full extent of his crimes to his grave. Stansbury, an ice cream truck driver, was serving time for raping and killing a 10-year-old girl. He had a long record of sexual assaults, at least once using his ice cream truck as a ruse. Detectives long suspected there were more victims but could not prove it. This week, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department detectives announced that they have DNA evidence linking Stansbury to a decades-old cold case in Pomona.
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