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Dharma Publishing

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1997 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an unheated warehouse, a van-sized printing press groans and spits out sheets of paper covered in what--to the uninitiated--looks like chicken scratching. The characters, however, are the elegant spikes and lilting curlicues of the Tibetan language. And here they are part of one of the great publishing feats in history, one that inches forward page by page.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1997 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an unheated warehouse, a van-sized printing press groans and spits out sheets of paper covered in what--to the uninitiated--looks like chicken scratching. The characters, however, are the elegant spikes and lilting curlicues of the Tibetan language. And here they are part of one of the great publishing feats in history, one that inches forward page by page.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1992 | CLAUDIA MORAIN, Morain is a free-lance writer who lives in Davis
Faye Councel Polillo, 58, flew here from Maryland at her own cost to work without pay binding Tibetan Buddhist books she cannot read. A mathematics teacher on sabbatical from a private preparatory school in Annapolis, Polillo is one of about 100 volunteers who have donated their labor to a mammoth 5-year-old private publishing project aimed at preserving ancient Tibetan scriptures and returning them to monasteries in that autonomous region of China.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1995 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lined up in row after row of gold-stamped order, their elegant bindings bathed in a soft amber glow, the vast collection of books projects an aura of serene scholarship. But behind the newly published volumes lies a tale of tragedy and loss, of sacred manuscripts smuggled to freedom and rescued from the detritus of a pillaged culture. This book-lined room is the result of a 25-year mission to recreate the lost libraries of Tibet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1995 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lined up in row after row of gold-stamped order, their elegant bindings bathed in a soft amber glow, the vast collection of books projects an aura of serene scholarship. But behind the newly published volumes lies a tale of tragedy and loss, of sacred manuscripts smuggled to freedom and rescued from the detritus of a pillaged culture. This book-lined room is the result of a 25-year mission to recreate the lost libraries of Tibet.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In a time of widespread demands for ethnic self-determination, the plight of Tibet, occupied by the Chinese since 1959, seems to have been forgotten. Prepared under the auspices of the Tibetan Aid Project, "From the Roof of the World" dramatizes the plight of the more than 100,000 refugees who have fled to India, Nepal and Bhutan.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hanging on the wall of the Tibetan Buddhist exhibit, the sacred art of centuries past gleams in the mellow glow of museum lighting. In a back room a few steps away stands something that helped create the display--a thoroughly up-to-date computerized, two-color press. It's centuries-old knowledge meets modern know-how as a group of Buddhist scholars and artists works to restore the lost religious heritage of Tibet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993 | JOHN DART
The 1970s and '80s saw Buddhism carve itself a slender slice of the American pie of religious diversity. To a small extent, U.S. Buddhist ranks grew with American-born converts captivated by meditation, Eastern philosophy and the tranquil way of the Buddha. Many more adherents were young immigrants from Korea, Vietnam, Thailand and other Asian countries where Buddhism was simply part of the culture.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wanted: bookbinders. Free room, board and a small stipend. One- to three-month commitment. No experience necessary. Subject: endangered Tibetan Buddhist teachings. If the job doesn't sound like a smart career move, at least the perks are good. Consider that you may get to visit the recently completed Odiyan Tibetan retreat. Odiyan (pronounced Odie-ON) stands on a coastal cliff north of Petaluma, somewhere between the big blue sky, the vast green ocean and herds of brown and white cows.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In a time of widespread demands for ethnic self-determination, the plight of Tibet, occupied by the Chinese since 1959, seems to have been forgotten. Prepared under the auspices of the Tibetan Aid Project, "From the Roof of the World" dramatizes the plight of the more than 100,000 refugees who have fled to India, Nepal and Bhutan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1992 | CLAUDIA MORAIN, Morain is a free-lance writer who lives in Davis
Faye Councel Polillo, 58, flew here from Maryland at her own cost to work without pay binding Tibetan Buddhist books she cannot read. A mathematics teacher on sabbatical from a private preparatory school in Annapolis, Polillo is one of about 100 volunteers who have donated their labor to a mammoth 5-year-old private publishing project aimed at preserving ancient Tibetan scriptures and returning them to monasteries in that autonomous region of China.
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