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BUSINESS
February 6, 2001 | Associated Press
DHL Worldwide Express Inc. asked federal regulators to dismiss complaints over its foreign ownership that were brought last month by its shipping-business rivals, FedEx Corp. and United Parcel Service Inc. In a 22-page filing with the Transportation Department, DHL said FedEx and UPS were unfairly trying to stifle competition.
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BUSINESS
May 12, 2001 | Bloomberg News
The Transportation Department rejected efforts by United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp. that challenged the legality of rival DHL Airways Inc. and DHL Worldwide Express Inc. to compete for business. United Parcel and FedEx filed a complaint with the department in January, saying DHL Airways' owners violate a U.S. law that limits foreign ownership of a U.S.-based airline to 25%. The department said it found no reason to launch a formal inquiry of the cargo carrier's citizenship.
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BUSINESS
May 12, 2001 | Bloomberg News
The Transportation Department rejected efforts by United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp. that challenged the legality of rival DHL Airways Inc. and DHL Worldwide Express Inc. to compete for business. United Parcel and FedEx filed a complaint with the department in January, saying DHL Airways' owners violate a U.S. law that limits foreign ownership of a U.S.-based airline to 25%. The department said it found no reason to launch a formal inquiry of the cargo carrier's citizenship.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2001 | Associated Press
DHL Worldwide Express Inc. asked federal regulators to dismiss complaints over its foreign ownership that were brought last month by its shipping-business rivals, FedEx Corp. and United Parcel Service Inc. In a 22-page filing with the Transportation Department, DHL said FedEx and UPS were unfairly trying to stifle competition.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1999
DHL International Ltd. said it is considering an initial public offer that analysts estimate could value the overnight delivery service company at as much as $4 billion. Brussels-based DHL International, a member of Redwood City, Calif.-based DHL Worldwide Express Inc., is aiming for the sale of 23% of the company as early as 2001. The company is seeking funds to accelerate an expansion in Europe. The closely held company also said it bought back a 20% stake from Japan Airlines Co.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1999 | Bloomberg News
DHL International Ltd. said it's talking with Boeing Co. and Airbus Industrie about an order worth $1.3 billion for about 45 planes for use in Europe and Africa. The delivery service company, part of closely held DHL Worldwide Express, expects to make a decision by next month on the aircraft purchase, which would be the largest in its 30-year history. The planes would replace DHL's fleet of Boeing 727s and Airbus A-300s.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1999 | Bloomberg News
DHL International Ltd. plans to announce an order for at least 34 Boeing 757s converted from passenger to cargo use, making the delivery company Boeing Co.'s first customer for the conversion program, people familiar with the order said. DHL, based in Redwood City, Calif., said only that it will spend $1.3 billion on planes for use in Europe and Africa, which would make it the biggest aircraft purchase in its 30-year history. DHL said it will disclose details of the order Tuesday.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE and DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It is a jet-age pony express, ducking Scud missile attacks to get parcels to businessmen when even the post office is closed. Toting gas masks and antidotes for Iraq's poison gas, drivers for DHL International thread their way daily through Saudi Arabia's sun-baked Eastern Province, close to the front lines of the Persian Gulf War. It is a tricky business. Air raid warnings have delayed cargo-laden DHL turboprops headed for outlying towns.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driver Li Jing Chun, a wiry 28-year-old with a passion for jazz, has listened religiously to "Goat City Radio Station, FM 105.2" since joining air express giant DHL earlier this year. Far from easy listening, this is on-air chaos, providing regular updates on the latest automobile pileup, sewer backup or errant farm animals plaguing drivers in this southern China industrial capital long known in the West as Canton.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1997 | Bloomberg News
DHL Airways Inc. said it agreed to buy seven used Airbus Industrie passenger aircraft and have them converted into freighters. The purchase would be DHL's first from Airbus. Most of the planes in the freight company's fleet are made by either Boeing Co. or McDonnell Douglas Corp. The price of the aircraft has yet to be determined, said DHL spokesman Dave Fonkalsrud. It will be set after DHL chooses a company to convert the jetliners to freighters.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1999
DHL International Ltd. said it is considering an initial public offer that analysts estimate could value the overnight delivery service company at as much as $4 billion. Brussels-based DHL International, a member of Redwood City, Calif.-based DHL Worldwide Express Inc., is aiming for the sale of 23% of the company as early as 2001. The company is seeking funds to accelerate an expansion in Europe. The closely held company also said it bought back a 20% stake from Japan Airlines Co.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1999 | Bloomberg News
DHL International Ltd. plans to announce an order for at least 34 Boeing 757s converted from passenger to cargo use, making the delivery company Boeing Co.'s first customer for the conversion program, people familiar with the order said. DHL, based in Redwood City, Calif., said only that it will spend $1.3 billion on planes for use in Europe and Africa, which would make it the biggest aircraft purchase in its 30-year history. DHL said it will disclose details of the order Tuesday.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1999 | Bloomberg News
DHL International Ltd. said it's talking with Boeing Co. and Airbus Industrie about an order worth $1.3 billion for about 45 planes for use in Europe and Africa. The delivery service company, part of closely held DHL Worldwide Express, expects to make a decision by next month on the aircraft purchase, which would be the largest in its 30-year history. The planes would replace DHL's fleet of Boeing 727s and Airbus A-300s.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driver Li Jing Chun, a wiry 28-year-old with a passion for jazz, has listened religiously to "Goat City Radio Station, FM 105.2" since joining air express giant DHL earlier this year. Far from easy listening, this is on-air chaos, providing regular updates on the latest automobile pileup, sewer backup or errant farm animals plaguing drivers in this southern China industrial capital long known in the West as Canton.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE and DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It is a jet-age pony express, ducking Scud missile attacks to get parcels to businessmen when even the post office is closed. Toting gas masks and antidotes for Iraq's poison gas, drivers for DHL International thread their way daily through Saudi Arabia's sun-baked Eastern Province, close to the front lines of the Persian Gulf War. It is a tricky business. Air raid warnings have delayed cargo-laden DHL turboprops headed for outlying towns.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2003 | From Reuters
Privately held air cargo shipper DHL Airways said a group of U.S. investors led by its chairman would buy all of the company's outstanding shares to help quell concerns over its ownership. Chairman and Chief Executive John Dasburg, along with Richard C. Blum of San Francisco's Blum Capital Partners and other U.S. investors, will buy the DHL Airways shares Dasburg does not already own from Idaho investor William Robinson and from DHL Holdings for $57 million. Dasburg now has a 5% stake.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
The package courier DHL Worldwide Express is letting its U.S. truck fleet carry its advertising load. The California-based company is forgoing traditional ads but hopes to catch customers' attention with a splashy redesign of signs on its entire 3,000-vehicle U.S. fleet. The trucks will now each carry three destination names such as Tokyo, London, India and Turkey in big letters, and the company name in less prominent type to highlight DHL's international delivery capability.
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