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As awards go, Willie Randolph has won rooms full of bigger, brighter, more recognizable trophies. But perhaps there is no honor that has touched the Dodger second baseman as deeply as the one he will receive in Los Angeles Monday afternoon, when he will be one of the original inductees into the NutraSweet/Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Hall of Fame.
April 4, 1994 | MIMI KO
Pacifica Community Hospital in Huntington Beach is seeking volunteers to take part in a nationwide vision study in which participants would take a drug for four years in order to determine if blindness can be prevented in diabetics. The drug, Trental, is a medication doctors believe may be helpful with eye complications in people who suffer from diabetes.
February 17, 2011 | David Lazarus
David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28. He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the seafood off the top and leaving the rice. Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill up on fish.
July 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
File this one under the Celebrities Under Fire column: Shaquille O'Neal, the retired NBA player, recently announced he was launching a line of low-calorie sodas with Arizona Beverages called Soda Shaq Cream Soda.  But like other celebrities who hawk sodas, O'Neal has come under fire by some consumer groups for promoting sugar-laden soft drinks.  PHOTOS: The strangest business sponsorships The Center for Science in the...
February 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smoking appears to significantly boost the risk of kidney damage among diabetics, Colorado scientists reported last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Researchers from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver said their study of 359 insulin-dependent diabetics ages 14 to 21 found that those who smoked were two to three times more likely to develop kidney damage than nonsmokers. To gauge the amount of kidney damage, H.
October 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diabetics were twice as likely to die in the nine years after balloon angioplasty, a common procedure used to treat blocked arteries, a new study said. About 36% of diabetics died within nine years after balloon angioplasty, a rate double that of non-diabetics, the study found. Diabetics also experienced considerably higher rates of heart attacks as well as bypass surgeries and repeat angioplasties, said David Faxon, lead author of the study in the American Heart Assn. journal, Circulation.
January 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Smoking raises the risk of diabetes, but new research indicates that -- at least in the short term -- kicking the habit increases the risk even more. The problem is not really quitting smoking. It's the pounds most people pack on when they give up cigarettes, researchers reported Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Smokers who plan to quit should be very careful not to start eating more and thus gain weight, said epidemiologist Hsin-Chieh "Jessica" Yeh of Johns Hopkins University, the lead author of the study.
April 2, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Patients with Type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, although the reasons are unclear, Finnish researchers have reported. They found that people with Type 2 diabetes were 83% more likely to be diagnosed with Parkinson's later in life than people in the general population. This risk was independent of other risk factors. "Diabetes might increase the risk of Parkinson's disease partly through excess body weight," the researchers wrote in the April issue of Diabetes Care.
April 4, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Diabetes may be more dangerous than we thought. New research suggests that people with diabetes are slightly more likely to die from cancer than are people without diabetes. As if managing the laundry list of diabetes-related illnesses such as heart disease, blindness and kidney failure weren’t bad enough, it appears that women with diabetes have an 11% increased risk of dying from cancer and men have a 17% higher risk than those without diabetes. The findings were presented Sunday in Orlando, Fla., at the American Assn.
June 22, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke out this week about her Type 1 diabetes, calling attention to the issue—a condition that as many as 3 million Americans know well. The pinpricks for blood, the glucose monitors, the insulin injections… Daily life isn’t easy, the Supreme Court justice told a gathering of children with diabetes. An online diabetic community would seem to agree. This from the blog Cure Moll : “When I was 10, my mom and I were used to shots, we knew the perfect amount of insulin for everything, from a small piece of pizza and cake at a birthday party to simply cereal for breakfast.
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