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As awards go, Willie Randolph has won rooms full of bigger, brighter, more recognizable trophies. But perhaps there is no honor that has touched the Dodger second baseman as deeply as the one he will receive in Los Angeles Monday afternoon, when he will be one of the original inductees into the NutraSweet/Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Hall of Fame.
April 4, 1994 | MIMI KO
Pacifica Community Hospital in Huntington Beach is seeking volunteers to take part in a nationwide vision study in which participants would take a drug for four years in order to determine if blindness can be prevented in diabetics. The drug, Trental, is a medication doctors believe may be helpful with eye complications in people who suffer from diabetes.
February 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smoking appears to significantly boost the risk of kidney damage among diabetics, Colorado scientists reported last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Researchers from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver said their study of 359 insulin-dependent diabetics ages 14 to 21 found that those who smoked were two to three times more likely to develop kidney damage than nonsmokers. To gauge the amount of kidney damage, H.
October 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diabetics were twice as likely to die in the nine years after balloon angioplasty, a common procedure used to treat blocked arteries, a new study said. About 36% of diabetics died within nine years after balloon angioplasty, a rate double that of non-diabetics, the study found. Diabetics also experienced considerably higher rates of heart attacks as well as bypass surgeries and repeat angioplasties, said David Faxon, lead author of the study in the American Heart Assn. journal, Circulation.
April 4, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Diabetes may be more dangerous than we thought. New research suggests that people with diabetes are slightly more likely to die from cancer than are people without diabetes. As if managing the laundry list of diabetes-related illnesses such as heart disease, blindness and kidney failure weren’t bad enough, it appears that women with diabetes have an 11% increased risk of dying from cancer and men have a 17% higher risk than those without diabetes. The findings were presented Sunday in Orlando, Fla., at the American Assn.
January 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Smoking raises the risk of diabetes, but new research indicates that -- at least in the short term -- kicking the habit increases the risk even more. The problem is not really quitting smoking. It's the pounds most people pack on when they give up cigarettes, researchers reported Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Smokers who plan to quit should be very careful not to start eating more and thus gain weight, said epidemiologist Hsin-Chieh "Jessica" Yeh of Johns Hopkins University, the lead author of the study.
November 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Two of the most worrisome trends in healthcare - the soaring rates of Type 2 diabetes and dementia - share several key biological processes. And scientists are beginning to think that is more than just a coincidence. Many researchers now believe that proper control of blood sugar could pay dividends in the future by reducing the number of people stricken by Alzheimer's disease, other forms of dementia and even the normal cognitive decline that comes with age. The concept that brain diseases share little in common with diseases arising elsewhere in the body is rapidly crumbling, says Debra Cherry, executive vice president of the Alzheimer's Assn.
April 2, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Patients with Type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, although the reasons are unclear, Finnish researchers have reported. They found that people with Type 2 diabetes were 83% more likely to be diagnosed with Parkinson's later in life than people in the general population. This risk was independent of other risk factors. "Diabetes might increase the risk of Parkinson's disease partly through excess body weight," the researchers wrote in the April issue of Diabetes Care.
November 27, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Researchers from USC and the University of Oxford say they have found an association between countries that have more high fructose corn syrup in their food supply and those that have higher rates of diabetes. Countries with higher use of HFCS had an average prevalence of Type 2 diabetes of 8%, compared with 6.7% in countries that don't use it, according to the research published Tuesday in the journal Global Public Health. Those differences held, the researchers said, after adjustments for body mass index, population and gross domestic product.
April 21, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A high-fat "ketogenic" diet may reverse the kidney damage caused by diabetes, a study published online Wednesday by the journal PLoS One reports. Past research has shown that lowering blood sugar through diet can prevent kidney failure but not reverse it in patients with diabetes.  Lead author Charles Mobbs, a neuroscientist at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, said that this study -- in which mice were fed a high-fat diet of...
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