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Diabetes

SCIENCE
July 22, 2006 | From Reuters
Diabetes and pre-diabetic conditions appear to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, but drugs that help regulate blood sugar may help patients with dementia as well. Several studies presented at a meeting in Spain this week showed that patients who took some of the drugs prescribed for Type 2 diabetes were less likely to have Alzheimer's disease. There is no cure for Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia, which affect more than 4 million people in the United States.
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HEALTH
November 3, 1997
The holiday season can be difficult for diabetics, what with social gatherings offering tempting foods that are not on their careful diet. The City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte is hosting a free program, "Prescription for Life: A Holiday Workshop for Diabetes Management" on Saturday from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Dietitians and others will discuss socializing, meal planning and alternatives to holiday treats. For more information, call (626) 301-8961.
HEALTH
October 25, 1999 | Claire Panosian Dunavan
One of life's mysteries is how suffering can transform an ordinary human life. Some people call it breaking through to higher ground. Or claiming victory from defeat. Most of us don't know what to call it because we haven't been there. Here's the story of someone who has. Steve Edelman was 15 when his symptoms first hit: fatigue, excess thirst and urination, a scab that wouldn't heal. Then he lost 20 pounds. The final clue was his blood sugar: sky-high.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A high-fat "ketogenic" diet may reverse the kidney damage caused by diabetes, a study published online Wednesday by the journal PLoS One reports. Past research has shown that lowering blood sugar through diet can prevent kidney failure but not reverse it in patients with diabetes.  Lead author Charles Mobbs, a neuroscientist at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, said that this study -- in which mice were fed a high-fat diet of...
SPORTS
May 12, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As awards go, Willie Randolph has won rooms full of bigger, brighter, more recognizable trophies. But perhaps there is no honor that has touched the Dodger second baseman as deeply as the one he will receive in Los Angeles Monday afternoon, when he will be one of the original inductees into the NutraSweet/Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Hall of Fame.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1994 | MIMI KO
Pacifica Community Hospital in Huntington Beach is seeking volunteers to take part in a nationwide vision study in which participants would take a drug for four years in order to determine if blindness can be prevented in diabetics. The drug, Trental, is a medication doctors believe may be helpful with eye complications in people who suffer from diabetes.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2011 | David Lazarus
David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28. He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the seafood off the top and leaving the rice. Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill up on fish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smoking appears to significantly boost the risk of kidney damage among diabetics, Colorado scientists reported last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Researchers from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver said their study of 359 insulin-dependent diabetics ages 14 to 21 found that those who smoked were two to three times more likely to develop kidney damage than nonsmokers. To gauge the amount of kidney damage, H.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diabetics were twice as likely to die in the nine years after balloon angioplasty, a common procedure used to treat blocked arteries, a new study said. About 36% of diabetics died within nine years after balloon angioplasty, a rate double that of non-diabetics, the study found. Diabetics also experienced considerably higher rates of heart attacks as well as bypass surgeries and repeat angioplasties, said David Faxon, lead author of the study in the American Heart Assn. journal, Circulation.
HEALTH
February 16, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Anyone seeking the fountain of youth should think twice before turning to growth hormone, a fast-growing trend in anti-aging fringe medicine. If conclusions from a study of an obscure population living in Ecuador prove true, less growth hormone ? not more ? may help prevent cancer and diabetes in old age. The discovery, published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine, backs up earlier research showing that yeast, flies and rodents live longer ? in some species, as much as 10 times longer ?
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