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Diabetes

NEWS
December 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Earlier reports that drinking cow's milk may trigger the onset of juvenile diabetes in susceptible people may be wrong, Florida researchers report today. Last year, Canadian researchers said most people who develop the disease, also known as insulin-dependent or Type 1 diabetes, have antibodies against a milk protein in their blood. This protein strongly resembles a protein found in the pancreas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports and
Pregnant women with diabetes can reduce their high risk of miscarriage by keeping their blood sugar levels under control, a federal study shows. The study tried to settle a long debate over whether diabetes increases a woman's risk of miscarriage. It found that the higher the blood sugar level in diabetic women, the higher the risk of miscarriage. However, women who keep their sugar levels in the normal range have no higher risk than women without diabetes.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke out this week about her Type 1 diabetes, calling attention to the issue—a condition that as many as 3 million Americans know well. The pinpricks for blood, the glucose monitors, the insulin injections… Daily life isn’t easy, the Supreme Court justice told a gathering of children with diabetes. An online diabetic community would seem to agree. This from the blog Cure Moll : “When I was 10, my mom and I were used to shots, we knew the perfect amount of insulin for everything, from a small piece of pizza and cake at a birthday party to simply cereal for breakfast.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2011 | David Lazarus
David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28. He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the seafood off the top and leaving the rice. Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill up on fish.
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Type 2 diabetes, like Type 1, may be an autoimmune disease, but the immune system's target cells are different, Stanford researchers said Sunday. The discovery sheds new light on how obesity contributes to the onset of Type 2 diabetes and could lead to new types of treatment for the disorder, the researchers reported in the journal Nature Medicine. Diabetes is a growing problem in the United States, triggered in large part by the obesity epidemic. An estimated 27 million Americans are now thought to have diabetes, with the vast majority of them -- all but about a million -- afflicted with Type 2 diabetes.
HEALTH
May 24, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Having diabetes may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to new findings from a well-known study of Catholic clergy. Researchers from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago reported that among 824 nuns, priests and brothers followed for an average of 5 1/2 years, 151 had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's -- among them 31 diabetics. Diabetics, they calculated, had a 65% higher risk of developing Alzheimer's than nondiabetics.
HEALTH
July 14, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
If Daniel Kaufman hadn't had car trouble, he might have missed the biggest discovery of his career. As a young neuroscience researcher at UC San Diego's Salk Institute in the early '90s, Kaufman left for home one day only to find that his car wouldn't start. He tried to return to his lab while awaiting a ride but found the floor was being waxed. He then wandered into the institute's library and picked up a medical journal. It fell open to an article on Type 1 diabetes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1998
I am a physician at UCLA and a consultant for Parke-Davis. I have also either consulted for, spoken for and/or done research with most of the major drug manufacturers for the treatment of diabetes. Pharmaceutical dollars fund much clinical research and sponsor many educational initiatives. Your Dec. 6-7 articles are one-sided and present data only on risk, not benefit. Rezulin is unique in its action. It has allowed me to effectively treat hundreds of patients who were not otherwise controlled on anti-diabetes medication.
NEWS
August 9, 1992
As an Hispanic who has been recently diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, I read your article ("Minority Groups at Risk of Diabetes," July 21) with interest. I am currently enrolled in a research study at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, that is investigating the effects of the drug glipizide on the blood-glucose levels in minorities. Through education received here, I have learned that with proper diet, medication, exercise, constant personal monitoring of my blood-sugar levels, and most of all, attitude adjustment, I will live a productive life.
HEALTH
September 13, 2004 | From Reuters
Just under 60% of diabetes patients who have received an experimental transplant of pancreatic cells are able to live without insulin injections a year later, Canadian and U.S. doctors have reported. Researchers at 12 medical centers in the United States and Canada reported on 86 patients with Type 1 diabetes in the first report of the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry. The report, found on the Internet at www.citregistry.
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