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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
One of the most touching anecdotes in Linda Ronstadt's new memoir, "Simple Dreams," comes in the moment she told her parents she was skipping out on college to pursue a career in music. "My parents were upset and tried to talk me out of it," she writes in the book, published Sept. 17. "When it became apparent that they couldn't change my mind, my father went into the other room and returned with the Martin acoustic guitar that his father had bought in 1898. "When my father began singing as a young man, my grandfather had given him the instrument and said, ' Ahora que tienes guitarra, nunca tendrás hambre .' ('Now that you own a guitar, you will never be hungry.')
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SCIENCE
May 17, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Go to a busy street in your community and count the next 25 adolescents who walk, bike, skateboard, stroll or saunter past. Odds are that two of those 25 kids (8.3% to be exact) would own up to having experienced 14 or more days in the last month that he or she considered "mentally unhealthy," according to a comprehensive report on the mental health of American youth issued Thursday. Between 2005 and 2010, roughly 2 million American adolescents between 12 and 17 acknowledged that for more than half of the previous month, they routinely had felt sad, angry, disconnected, stressed out, unloved or possibly willing to hurt themselves -- or others.
OPINION
January 22, 2011
Five million Americans have Alzheimer's, a scourge of a disease that is hard to diagnose, harder to predict and, so far, unpreventable and incurable. There is no chemotherapy for Alzheimer's. And the drugs that are currently prescribed are more like bandages on a bleeding wound than the powerful cocktails that tame HIV. The greatest risk factor for the disease is simply getting old ? an unsettling thought for the first wave of baby boomers turning 65 this year. One study estimates that between 7,000 and 10,000 baby boomers will hit that milestone every day for the next 19 years.
HEALTH
August 29, 2011 | By Allison Conway, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I sat in an uncomfortable flower-print chair in my neurologist's office. The nurses in the front office were talking to each other about what type of sandwich they would order for lunch. The background was filled with traces of annoying soft-rock music and an overpowering smell of coffee. It was apparent that someone put much effort into creating a calm and relaxing environment, but at the moment it felt as irritating as wearing an itchy sweater in the desert. Hearing the diagnosis — "You have Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Childbirth can trigger psychiatric illnesses in some women, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and even psychosis. A study published Monday, however, draws the first connection ever between postpartum mental illness and later bipolar disorder. Researchers searched a Danish registry of more than 120,000 women receiving treatment for a first episode of a psychiatric illness other than bipolar disorder. They found 3,062 women who had a first episode of a mental disorder other than bipolar disorder but who were later diagnosed with bipolar disorder.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | United Press International
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland will be hospitalized next week for diagnosis of a growth on his kidney, Kirkland told the AFL-CIO Executive Council today. But Kirkland, 64, also told the 35-member governing body of the AFL-CIO that he intends to run for reelection in October. He will enter John Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore next Tuesday for diagnosis of the growth.
OPINION
November 11, 2006
Re "One diagnosis away from despair," Current, Nov. 5 Diana Wagman's experience with her son's treatment for depression highlights what is happening today in the mental health treatment of adolescents and children. In the past, when a child had obvious problems, it was minimized with the idea that this was a phase the child would get through eventually. Today, a diagnosis is quickly presented and a medication is prescribed. Both parents and clinicians feel pressure to see improvement as quickly as possible, and mistakes in treatment are inevitable.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Finally, after years of suffering through Hollywood's predictable pap, sentimental mush, boring bromances and mean girl clichés, comes a love story that is actually worth falling for, with Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal excellent at steaming up the screen in "Love & Other Drugs. " The trick is that in director Ed Zwick's world, love hurts. It may be funny, charming, poignant and sexy, and "Love & Other Drugs" is all that too, but at some point it stings like astringent on a fresh scrape.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013
Thom McDaniels is no stranger to surgery. As a longtime athlete and high school football coach, he's spent years putting his knees through the wringer. After injuring his right knee again during football practice, he was told by an orthopedic surgeon that it was time for reconstructive surgery. Reluctant to undergo a seventh knee surgery, he tried a lightweight knee brace that wraps around his leg from the thigh area to just below the knee. It changed the Ohio coach's life. "It's like somebody turned a light on," he said.
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