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Diagnosis

OPINION
January 22, 2011
Five million Americans have Alzheimer's, a scourge of a disease that is hard to diagnose, harder to predict and, so far, unpreventable and incurable. There is no chemotherapy for Alzheimer's. And the drugs that are currently prescribed are more like bandages on a bleeding wound than the powerful cocktails that tame HIV. The greatest risk factor for the disease is simply getting old ? an unsettling thought for the first wave of baby boomers turning 65 this year. One study estimates that between 7,000 and 10,000 baby boomers will hit that milestone every day for the next 19 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
One of the most touching anecdotes in Linda Ronstadt's new memoir, "Simple Dreams," comes in the moment she told her parents she was skipping out on college to pursue a career in music. "My parents were upset and tried to talk me out of it," she writes in the book, published Sept. 17. "When it became apparent that they couldn't change my mind, my father went into the other room and returned with the Martin acoustic guitar that his father had bought in 1898. "When my father began singing as a young man, my grandfather had given him the instrument and said, ' Ahora que tienes guitarra, nunca tendrás hambre .' ('Now that you own a guitar, you will never be hungry.')
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | United Press International
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland will be hospitalized next week for diagnosis of a growth on his kidney, Kirkland told the AFL-CIO Executive Council today. But Kirkland, 64, also told the 35-member governing body of the AFL-CIO that he intends to run for reelection in October. He will enter John Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore next Tuesday for diagnosis of the growth.
SCIENCE
March 27, 2014 | Alan Zarembo
Autism is much more common than previously thought, according to a new government report that estimates that 1 in 68 children have some form of the disorder. Boosting the rate has become a two-year ritual since the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention set up a surveillance system more than a decade ago. The last estimate, in 2012, was 1 in 88, up from 1 in 110 two years before that. As in the past, researchers could not say what was driving the increase. While the role of environmental factors remains an open question, rising awareness of the disorder, greater detection and improved access to services have all been shown to be significant factors in the explosive growth in diagnosis over the last two decades.
SCIENCE
May 17, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Go to a busy street in your community and count the next 25 adolescents who walk, bike, skateboard, stroll or saunter past. Odds are that two of those 25 kids (8.3% to be exact) would own up to having experienced 14 or more days in the last month that he or she considered "mentally unhealthy," according to a comprehensive report on the mental health of American youth issued Thursday. Between 2005 and 2010, roughly 2 million American adolescents between 12 and 17 acknowledged that for more than half of the previous month, they routinely had felt sad, angry, disconnected, stressed out, unloved or possibly willing to hurt themselves -- or others.
OPINION
November 11, 2006
Re "One diagnosis away from despair," Current, Nov. 5 Diana Wagman's experience with her son's treatment for depression highlights what is happening today in the mental health treatment of adolescents and children. In the past, when a child had obvious problems, it was minimized with the idea that this was a phase the child would get through eventually. Today, a diagnosis is quickly presented and a medication is prescribed. Both parents and clinicians feel pressure to see improvement as quickly as possible, and mistakes in treatment are inevitable.
HEALTH
August 29, 2011 | By Allison Conway, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I sat in an uncomfortable flower-print chair in my neurologist's office. The nurses in the front office were talking to each other about what type of sandwich they would order for lunch. The background was filled with traces of annoying soft-rock music and an overpowering smell of coffee. It was apparent that someone put much effort into creating a calm and relaxing environment, but at the moment it felt as irritating as wearing an itchy sweater in the desert. Hearing the diagnosis — "You have Parkinson's disease.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2013 | By Jenny Deam, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
CENTENNIAL, Colo. -- The judge in the Aurora movie theater massacre case paved the way Monday for James E. Holmes to plead not guilty by reason of insanity but did not formally accept that plea, delaying that decision until later this month. Judge Carlos Samour Jr. of Colorado's 18th Judicial District, ruled that the defense had made its case that the plea should be changed from a traditional not guilty plea to an insanity plea. He said his decision was “consistent with fairness and justice” for Holmes.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Pregnant women who took the anti-seizure drug valproate during pregnancy increased the odds that their baby would have autism, and were roughly twice as likely to give birth to a child who would go on to be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, according to a large study that captured 10 years of births in Denmark. Valproate, often known by its commercial name Depakote, is widely prescribed in the treatment of epilepsy and a wide range of psychiatric conditions. It is one of a class of drugs that has been linked to a child's delayed cognitive development and to some congenital malformations.
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