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Diagnosis

OPINION
January 22, 2011
Five million Americans have Alzheimer's, a scourge of a disease that is hard to diagnose, harder to predict and, so far, unpreventable and incurable. There is no chemotherapy for Alzheimer's. And the drugs that are currently prescribed are more like bandages on a bleeding wound than the powerful cocktails that tame HIV. The greatest risk factor for the disease is simply getting old ? an unsettling thought for the first wave of baby boomers turning 65 this year. One study estimates that between 7,000 and 10,000 baby boomers will hit that milestone every day for the next 19 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
One of the most touching anecdotes in Linda Ronstadt's new memoir, "Simple Dreams," comes in the moment she told her parents she was skipping out on college to pursue a career in music. "My parents were upset and tried to talk me out of it," she writes in the book, published Sept. 17. "When it became apparent that they couldn't change my mind, my father went into the other room and returned with the Martin acoustic guitar that his father had bought in 1898. "When my father began singing as a young man, my grandfather had given him the instrument and said, ' Ahora que tienes guitarra, nunca tendrás hambre .' ('Now that you own a guitar, you will never be hungry.')
SCIENCE
May 17, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Go to a busy street in your community and count the next 25 adolescents who walk, bike, skateboard, stroll or saunter past. Odds are that two of those 25 kids (8.3% to be exact) would own up to having experienced 14 or more days in the last month that he or she considered "mentally unhealthy," according to a comprehensive report on the mental health of American youth issued Thursday. Between 2005 and 2010, roughly 2 million American adolescents between 12 and 17 acknowledged that for more than half of the previous month, they routinely had felt sad, angry, disconnected, stressed out, unloved or possibly willing to hurt themselves -- or others.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Childbirth can trigger psychiatric illnesses in some women, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and even psychosis. A study published Monday, however, draws the first connection ever between postpartum mental illness and later bipolar disorder. Researchers searched a Danish registry of more than 120,000 women receiving treatment for a first episode of a psychiatric illness other than bipolar disorder. They found 3,062 women who had a first episode of a mental disorder other than bipolar disorder but who were later diagnosed with bipolar disorder.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | United Press International
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland will be hospitalized next week for diagnosis of a growth on his kidney, Kirkland told the AFL-CIO Executive Council today. But Kirkland, 64, also told the 35-member governing body of the AFL-CIO that he intends to run for reelection in October. He will enter John Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore next Tuesday for diagnosis of the growth.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Jack Osbourne has revealed that he has multiple sclerosis, an incurable and unpredictable disease that attacks the central nervous system. The offspring of rocker Ozzy Osbourne and "America's Got Talent" judge Sharon Osbourne said the diagnosis came just as life was soaring with new joys. Osbourne, 26, and his fiancee recently welcomed a baby girl, Pearl. "While I was waiting for the final results, I got really, really angry," he told Hello! magazine. "Then I got really sad for about two days, and after that I realized: Being angry and upset is not going to do anything at this point, if anything it's only going to make it worse ...  'adapt and overcome' is my new motto.
SCIENCE
March 27, 2014 | Alan Zarembo
Autism is much more common than previously thought, according to a new government report that estimates that 1 in 68 children have some form of the disorder. Boosting the rate has become a two-year ritual since the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention set up a surveillance system more than a decade ago. The last estimate, in 2012, was 1 in 88, up from 1 in 110 two years before that. As in the past, researchers could not say what was driving the increase. While the role of environmental factors remains an open question, rising awareness of the disorder, greater detection and improved access to services have all been shown to be significant factors in the explosive growth in diagnosis over the last two decades.
OPINION
November 11, 2006
Re "One diagnosis away from despair," Current, Nov. 5 Diana Wagman's experience with her son's treatment for depression highlights what is happening today in the mental health treatment of adolescents and children. In the past, when a child had obvious problems, it was minimized with the idea that this was a phase the child would get through eventually. Today, a diagnosis is quickly presented and a medication is prescribed. Both parents and clinicians feel pressure to see improvement as quickly as possible, and mistakes in treatment are inevitable.
HEALTH
May 10, 2010 | By Lisa J. Manterfield, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I was five years into trying to conceive when I received the diagnosis that stopped my quest: premature ovarian failure. The only option for pregnancy would be donor eggs, and that was beyond our financial means and our level of acceptable medical intervention. I was only 37 years old — younger than my mother had been when I was conceived. I had no previous gynecological issues and no family history of infertility; "advanced maternal age" was a family trend, in fact. My diagnosis was completely unexpected.
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