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Diagnosis

OPINION
November 11, 2006
Re "One diagnosis away from despair," Current, Nov. 5 Diana Wagman's experience with her son's treatment for depression highlights what is happening today in the mental health treatment of adolescents and children. In the past, when a child had obvious problems, it was minimized with the idea that this was a phase the child would get through eventually. Today, a diagnosis is quickly presented and a medication is prescribed. Both parents and clinicians feel pressure to see improvement as quickly as possible, and mistakes in treatment are inevitable.
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NATIONAL
June 20, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Multiple sclerosis is in the spotlight this week after 26-year-old Jack Osbourne , a new dad, revealed he is battling the disease. Less well-known are the psychological challenges facing both the patient and his loved ones in the wake of such a diagnosis. Osbourne's mother, Sharon Osbourne, host of "America's Got Talent," offered a hint of this when she broke down this week while discussing her son's illness on "The Talk. " (Have some tissues handy if you watch it.)
SCIENCE
April 24, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Pregnant women who took the anti-seizure drug valproate during pregnancy increased the odds that their baby would have autism, and were roughly twice as likely to give birth to a child who would go on to be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, according to a large study that captured 10 years of births in Denmark. Valproate, often known by its commercial name Depakote, is widely prescribed in the treatment of epilepsy and a wide range of psychiatric conditions. It is one of a class of drugs that has been linked to a child's delayed cognitive development and to some congenital malformations.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | ANN CONWAY
If it weren't for a hiking trip, Nancy Santoro might not have gotten the early diagnosis that saved her life. About five years ago, Santoro began to notice that she bruised every time her dogs jumped on her. She was getting older, she told herself. And bruises come easy to an active woman like herself. She felt great: no pain. No fatigue. So she signed up for a weekend hiking expedition in the High Desert with her husband, Carm, and friends.
NEWS
October 18, 2010
Doctors usually diagnose Alzheimer's disease through a combination of medical and cognitive tests along with a brain scan. New studies, even one involving family members and friends, offer the promise of making the diagnosis easier -- and maybe even earlier. An August study in the Archives of Neurology used biomarkers to correctly classify patients who had Alzheimer's disease. The study tested normal people without the disease, those with mild brain impairments and those with the disease.
HEALTH
May 10, 2010 | By Lisa J. Manterfield, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I was five years into trying to conceive when I received the diagnosis that stopped my quest: premature ovarian failure. The only option for pregnancy would be donor eggs, and that was beyond our financial means and our level of acceptable medical intervention. I was only 37 years old — younger than my mother had been when I was conceived. I had no previous gynecological issues and no family history of infertility; "advanced maternal age" was a family trend, in fact. My diagnosis was completely unexpected.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2013 | By Jenny Deam, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
CENTENNIAL, Colo. -- The judge in the Aurora movie theater massacre case paved the way Monday for James E. Holmes to plead not guilty by reason of insanity but did not formally accept that plea, delaying that decision until later this month. Judge Carlos Samour Jr. of Colorado's 18th Judicial District, ruled that the defense had made its case that the plea should be changed from a traditional not guilty plea to an insanity plea. He said his decision was “consistent with fairness and justice” for Holmes.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013
Thom McDaniels is no stranger to surgery. As a longtime athlete and high school football coach, he's spent years putting his knees through the wringer. After injuring his right knee again during football practice, he was told by an orthopedic surgeon that it was time for reconstructive surgery. Reluctant to undergo a seventh knee surgery, he tried a lightweight knee brace that wraps around his leg from the thigh area to just below the knee. It changed the Ohio coach's life. "It's like somebody turned a light on," he said.
SPORTS
December 10, 2002 | Rob Fernas, Times Staff Writer
Will Kimble says he's praying for a miracle, and that's what it might take for the Pepperdine junior to play college basketball again. Kimble was the starting center for the Waves until he passed out at practice Nov. 26 and was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a heart condition that can cause sudden death. Kimble and his family are hoping the diagnosis was incorrect and have scheduled an evaluation by another cardiologist this week.
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