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Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders

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MAGAZINE
June 5, 1994 | Ann Japenga, Ann Japenga is a contributing editor for Health magazine. Her last story for this magazine was "Grunge R Us," a lament for the disappearing counterculture
Patients walk into Peter Breggin's office and lay their diagnoses on the couch: They're depressed. They're anxious. They're sure they have a measurable, palpable illness, with shape, substance, gravity, consistency. "A little boy came in with his parents and I asked him: 'Do you know why you're here?' " Breggin says. " 'Yes. I'm here because you're the doctor who doesn't believe I should take Ritalin for my ADHD (attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder).'
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SCIENCE
March 1, 2010
About hypersexual disorder Psychiatrists have proposed adding hypersexual disorder to the next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. A description of the disorder includes having four or more of the following criteria over at least six months. The symptoms must be severe and not caused by something else, such as drug abuse or medication. A great deal of time is consumed by sexual fantasies and urges and by planning for and engaging in sexual behavior.
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SCIENCE
March 1, 2010
About hypersexual disorder Psychiatrists have proposed adding hypersexual disorder to the next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. A description of the disorder includes having four or more of the following criteria over at least six months. The symptoms must be severe and not caused by something else, such as drug abuse or medication. A great deal of time is consumed by sexual fantasies and urges and by planning for and engaging in sexual behavior.
OPINION
February 13, 2010
Anew diagnostic manual prepared by the American Psychiatric Assn. either trivializes serious conditions, needlessly encourages hurtful stereotypes or succumbs to political correctness, depending on whom you believe. Even experts will question one classification or another in the draft fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is why it's been posted on the Internet for comments years before its expected publication in 2013. But the intention of the authors -- to define more precisely which conditions require psychotherapy and how they're related to one another -- is laudable.
OPINION
February 13, 2010
Anew diagnostic manual prepared by the American Psychiatric Assn. either trivializes serious conditions, needlessly encourages hurtful stereotypes or succumbs to political correctness, depending on whom you believe. Even experts will question one classification or another in the draft fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is why it's been posted on the Internet for comments years before its expected publication in 2013. But the intention of the authors -- to define more precisely which conditions require psychotherapy and how they're related to one another -- is laudable.
SCIENCE
May 26, 2009 | Shari Roan
Is the compulsion to hoard things a mental disorder? How about the practice of eating excessively at night? And what of Internet addiction: Should it be diagnosed and treated? As the clock ticks toward the release of the most influential of mental health textbooks, psychiatrists are asking themselves thousands of complex and sometimes controversial questions. The answers will determine how Americans' mental health is assessed, diagnosed and treated.
HEALTH
August 29, 2005
This is yet one more odd, albeit normal behavior that has been voted as a new mental illness by the psychiatric money machine ["A Tanning Addiction?" Aug. 23]. And, of course, the only "valid" treatment for mental illness is to drug the patient. How long are reasonable people, both in the medical profession and not, going to continue to allow the sham of DSM IV [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition] to be shoved down our throats by the psychiatrists? Enough already!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. John E. Fryer, 65, a psychiatrist considered a trailblazer in the gay rights movement for appearing before his colleagues at a 1972 convention in a mask to announce his homosexuality, died Feb. 21 in Philadelphia of aspiration pneumonia. Fryer appeared as Dr. H. Anonymous, clad in a full mask and wig, and using a voice-distorting microphone before the American Psychiatric Assn. meeting in Dallas at a time when homosexuality was designated a mental illness. "I am a homosexual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
"Pills for What Ails You Socially" (Opinion, July 23) is wrong to assert that "social anxiety disorder" and the antidepressant medicine used to treat it are "largely the innovation" of the drug's manufacturer and its ad agency. Specific criteria for diagnosing social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, have been described in the American Psychiatric Assn.'s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders since 1980. Paxil, an antidepressant, was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression in 1993 and was not approved for treatment of social anxiety disorder until 1999.
OPINION
September 1, 2013
Re "New look at male depression," Aug. 29 The study on depression in men illustrates why the National Institute of Mental Health recently rejected the structural framework of the official psychiatric Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as being without scientific validity. This extension of the diagnosis of depression is nothing more than describing a list of behaviors more common in men, including "risk taking" and "workaholism. " There are a wide range of such traits that are culturally defined, and even if problematic, they may be the optimal adjustment for a given person.
SCIENCE
May 26, 2009 | Shari Roan
Is the compulsion to hoard things a mental disorder? How about the practice of eating excessively at night? And what of Internet addiction: Should it be diagnosed and treated? As the clock ticks toward the release of the most influential of mental health textbooks, psychiatrists are asking themselves thousands of complex and sometimes controversial questions. The answers will determine how Americans' mental health is assessed, diagnosed and treated.
MAGAZINE
June 5, 1994 | Ann Japenga, Ann Japenga is a contributing editor for Health magazine. Her last story for this magazine was "Grunge R Us," a lament for the disappearing counterculture
Patients walk into Peter Breggin's office and lay their diagnoses on the couch: They're depressed. They're anxious. They're sure they have a measurable, palpable illness, with shape, substance, gravity, consistency. "A little boy came in with his parents and I asked him: 'Do you know why you're here?' " Breggin says. " 'Yes. I'm here because you're the doctor who doesn't believe I should take Ritalin for my ADHD (attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder).'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2000
Samuel B. Guze, 76, Washington University psychiatry professor who wrote an influential diagnostic manual. Guze shook up the psychiatric community in the 1950s when he urged that mental illness be diagnosed like physical illness, using a scientific medical model. Guze's advocacy of clinical psychiatry as a scientific endeavor stemmed from his background as an internist who switched to the study and treatment of mental illness.
OPINION
January 5, 2009
Re "Psychiatry manual's secrecy criticized," Dec. 29 Your story notes: "As the field has changed, the number of disorders in the DSM has tripled to 300, an increase paralleled by the rise in sales of drugs that pharmaceutical companies and psychiatrists tout as remedies for emotional suffering. Some critics suspect a quest for profits may have encouraged the field to create mental illnesses out of personality quirks." Readers might infer that this expansion was the result of adding disorders to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders that lack a known cause or are related to those disorders for which there is a new medication.
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