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Diagnostic Tests

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charlotte Cox lies on a table with 22 green, red, blue and yellow electrodes glued to her head. As she relaxes, the electroencephalograph machine she is wired to steadily spits out reams of graph paper filled with black zigzagging lines. Across the room, a fellow classmate, also sprawled out on a laboratory table, is having his head blown dry with an air hose so wires can be secured to his skull.
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NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
A lot of us find our way to the doctor with strange aches and pains that are very, very unlikely to be caused by serious illness -- headaches, back pains or stomach troubles, to name a few. To be on the safe side, physicians will often order tests to rule out the scary stuff and, the thinking goes, provide reassurance.  But a recent examination of 14 randomized, controlled trials found that ordering diagnostic tests for people who have a low...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992 | JAMES QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Double-murder charges against a 35-year-old Van Nuys man accused of raping and killing two female transients were dismissed Wednesday because DNA tests showed that someone else sexually assaulted one of the victims. Steven C. Leigh, described as a satanist and white power advocate, remains a suspect in the murders of Dawn McGrath, 21, and Jamie J. Jensen, 13, found shot Jan. 20, prosecutors said. However, Leigh's attorney, Bruce C.
HEALTH
April 17, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Even among psychiatric disorders, depression is a difficult disease to diagnose. Its causes remain a mystery, its symptoms can't be defined with precision, and treatments are spotty at best. But that may soon change. Scientists are looking for ways to identify patients with depression as reliably as they diagnose cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. A new study takes a significant, though preliminary, step in that direction by demonstrating that a simple blood test can distinguish between people who are depressed and those who are not. The test examined a panel of 28 biological markers that circulate in the bloodstream and found that 11 of them could predict the presence of depression at accuracy levels that ranged from medium to large.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consider two takes on Christopher Hubbart, serial rapist. State psychologist No. 1: He is a bright, shy 43-year-old man who is trying to control his sexual urges, and is truly sorry for his 34 victims. State psychologist No. 2: He is dangerous, unable to control his sexual urges and can be counted on to rape again.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
A lot of us find our way to the doctor with strange aches and pains that are very, very unlikely to be caused by serious illness -- headaches, back pains or stomach troubles, to name a few. To be on the safe side, physicians will often order tests to rule out the scary stuff and, the thinking goes, provide reassurance.  But a recent examination of 14 randomized, controlled trials found that ordering diagnostic tests for people who have a low...
BUSINESS
January 24, 1996
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. said Tuesday that federal regulators recently approved its diagnostic test for a metabolic disorder in newborns. The test detects the hereditary disorder galactosemia, which, if left untreated, can cause liver and brain damage, the drug company said. Early diagnosis enables the doctor to prescribe a special diet to reduce harmfully high sugar levels in an infant's blood. The federal Food and Drug Administration in November approved the test for marketing.
NEWS
September 7, 1986 | JOHN BARBOUR, Associated Press
Eva Engvall is a scientist who breeds Abyssinian cats as an avocation and is reluctant to name the kittens lest it become harder to part with them. That was not a problem with something as distant from cats as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a diagnostic test that she helped pioneer while a young graduate student at the University of Stockholm and which she gave the melodious name of ELISA. Since then, someone else patented the test and another company trademarked the name.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Two independent teams of medical researchers announced Thursday that they have succeeded in mapping the approximate location on human chromosomes of a genetic defect responsible for the most common inherited disease of the nervous system. The scientists, at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and at the University of Utah, said the discovery opens the way for the eventual development of diagnostic tests and possibly for treatment of neurofibromatosis, or NF.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1995 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beckman Instruments Inc. said Friday that it has agreed to acquire the once-soaring Hybritech Inc. medical test manufacturer from its parent company, drug maker Eli Lilly Co., for an undisclosed price. The acquisition of Hybritech, with annual sales of about $80 million, would boost Beckman's revenue to $1 billion and help round out the Fullerton company's line of diagnostic tests, industry analysts said. Beckman also makes and sells medical instruments and supplies.
OPINION
May 11, 2011
Water won't wait Re "Messing with Devil's Gate," Editorial, May 6 I lived in La Crescenta during the great flood of 1938. I remember listening to radio reports that Devil's Gate Dam was in imminent danger of collapsing. Fortunately it didn't, and the Arroyo Seco and the communities below were saved from a deluge of mud and water. The fact that the dam's basin has been allowed to fill with sediment over the years is a sign of ignorance and mismanagement. The L.A. County Board of Supervisors should make clearing out the basin a top priority.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
A new automated test to detect tuberculosis infections and the presence of an antibiotic-resistant TB strain can shave days to weeks off the time it takes to identify new infections, allowing treatment to be started immediately to prevent further spread of the bacterium. The new test, which can be performed by technicians with only limited training, could prove highly valuable not only in the developing world, but also in the inner cities of the developed world where outbreaks of the deadly disease are becoming more common.
NATIONAL
December 30, 2009 | Mcclatchy Newspapers
Researchers have taken a small but potentially significant step toward early detection of ovarian cancer, a deadly disease often diagnosed too late for effective treatment. Various cancer "biomarkers" show up in blood tests long before symptoms occur but aren't accurately predictive until later, when tumors probably have reached an advanced stage, scientists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle found. The study, published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, was headed by Garnet Anderson and Nicole Urban of the Hutchinson center's Division of Public Health Sciences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2009 | By Shane Goldmacher
The dollars saved are nearly negligible, but the political costs of scaling back breast cancer screening for tens of thousands of low-income women have turned out to be huge. Twenty-one members of California's congressional delegation -- Republicans and Democrats alike -- have sent a letter rebuking the governor for the move. State lawmakers are warning that people will die. Audits are being demanded. The Assembly Budget Committee chairwoman is even organizing a symbolic bake sale.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2009 | Bloomberg News
Women in their 40s should begin getting mammograms whenever they want, members of a U.S. advisory group told a House hearing Wednesday, saying their "poorly worded" recommendations last month had confused people. Physicians with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force told a House hearing that they had not meant to suggest that screenings were unnecessary for patients in that age group. Instead, the physicians said, they meant that screening is more effective for those 50 to 74. Republicans had trumpeted the initial recommendations, issued Nov. 16, as evidence that the Democratic-sponsored healthcare overhaul would lead to rationing of medical care.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2009 | By Karen Kaplan
It seemed like a good idea at the time. In 1984, Japan began screening the urine of 6-month-old infants for neuroblastoma, the most common type of solid tumor in young children. The test was simple and could show signs of cancer long before clinical symptoms arose. Hundreds of infants went through the ordeal of diagnosis and treatment, but it didn't reduce the number of tumors, including deadly ones, found later. Almost none of the tumors caught by screening turned out to be dangerous -- and more of the screened children died from complications of surgery and chemotherapy than from the cancer itself.
HEALTH
July 28, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
People with Alzheimer's face an awkward juncture in the near future. They'll be able to learn early on whether they have Alzheimer's disease -- even if they can't do much about it. With therapies to halt or slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease seeming ever more elusive, several blood tests currently in development could determine who has the disease even before symptoms develop or become severe.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | ROBIN HERMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
In assessing heart disease and deciding how to treat it, physicians rely on the angiogram as the standard diagnostic test. More than 1 million angiograms--special X-rays showing the inside of blood vessels--are performed in the United States each year. Based on the results of this test, surgeons performed 285,000 artery-clearing procedures called angioplasty and 380,000 heart bypass operations in 1990.
SCIENCE
November 20, 2009 | By Shari Roan
Only days after a federal panel scaled back on breast cancer screening recommendations for many women, another organization -- the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists -- has done the same for a screening credited with drastically reducing the rates of cervical cancer in the U.S. Women of all ages should undergo Pap smears less frequently than they do now, those new guidelines say. And young women are advised not to bother until age...
NATIONAL
November 17, 2009 | Judith Graham and Thomas H. Maugh II
A government panel's recommendation Monday that women under the age of 50 do not need regular mammograms set off a furious debate about the importance of the routine screening tool, leaving many women confused about how best to protect their health. In issuing its guidelines, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concluded that risk of breast cancer is very low in women age 40 to 50 and that the risk of false positives and complications from biopsies and other invasive procedures is too high for the procedure to be used routinely.
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